Pazuzu


Pazuzu

In Assyrian and Babylonian mythology, Pazuzu was the king of the demons of the wind, and son of the god Hanbi. He also represented the southwestern wind, the bearer of storms and drought.

Iconography

Pazuzu is often depicted as a combination of animal and human parts. He has the body of a man, the head of a lion or dog, eagle-like taloned feet, two pairs of wings, a scorpion's tail, and a serpentine penis. He is often depicted with his right hand pointing upward.

Mythology

Pazuzu is the god of the southwest wind known for bringing famine during dry seasons, and locusts during rainy seasons. Recent research suggests Pazuzu may have been associated with a cold, northeasterly wind. [cite web
last=Heeßel
first=Nils P.
url=http://www.religionswissenschaft.unizh.ch/idd/prepublications/e_idd_pazuzu.pdf
format=PDF
title=Pazuzu
work=Iconography of Deities and Demons in the Ancient Middle East
date=2006-12-14
accessdate=2007-09-27
] Pazuzu was said to be invoked in amulets which combat the powers of the malicious goddess, and hated rival, Lamashtu, who was believed to cause harm to mother and child during childbirth. Although Pazuzu is, himself, an evil spirit, he drives away other evil spirits, thus protecting humans against plagues and misfortunes.

References

External links

* [http://www.philhine.org.uk/writings/sp_pazuzu.html The Demon of the South-West Wind]
* [http://oi.uchicago.edu/museum/highlights/meso.html Oriental Institute of Chicago] figure of Pazuzu


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