10-in-1 food parcel

10-in-1 food parcel

The 10-in-1 food parcel, commonly known as the 10-in-1 ration was a field ration prepared for soldiers of the United States Army, intended to provide one meal for 10 men.

Development, Adoption, and Use

Although the possibility of packing the B ration in units of ten was suggested early in the war, progress on such an arrangement did not begin until 1943 when the Mountain, Jungle, and 5-in-1 rations were discontinued. The success of the British "compo" or 14-in-1 ration during the North African campaign in 1942 and the movement to classify field rations into four categories added incentive for development of the 10-in-1 ration. [Koehler, Franz A., "Special Rations for the Armed Forces: Army Operational Rations - A Historical Background", QMC Historical Studies, Historical Branch, Office of the Quartermaster General, Washington, D.C. (1958)] A guide to its rapid development was furnished in the following 1943 definition:

"A small-group field ration [shall be] composed of components of the standard field ration type B (modified to reduce bulk and weight) packed in basic packages of five complete rations each. . . . The inner and outer packages are to be proof against water, vapor, moisture, and chemical agents. They are to be of such shape and dimensions as to be suitable for either animal-pack or man-carry, and sufficiently sturdy as to material and construction to withstand normal handling and transportation in motor vehicles, on pack animals or by individual portage." [Koehler, Franz A., "Special Rations for the Armed Forces: Army Operational Rations - A Historical Background", QMC Historical Studies, Historical Branch, Office of the Quartermaster General, Washington, D.C. (1958)]

Specification requirements were quickly published, and the ration was standardized as the replacement for other group rations such as the 5-in-1 ration. Although superseding the 5-in-1, the 10-in-l was essentially two 5-in-1's packed in one unit. Within such a combination, it was possible to offer a greater variety of components. This was effected by increasing the number of "menus" to five in comparison to the three-menu arrangement of the 5-in-1. In ensuing war years, several revisions were made to the original specification but the basic plan of five menus, each containing sufficient food for ten men for one day, remained unaltered. Within the daily plan, complete group meals were specified for breakfast and supper while a "partial dinner unit was provided for the luncheon meal. [Koehler, Franz A., "Special Rations for the Armed Forces: Army Operational Rations - A Historical Background", QMC Historical Studies, Historical Branch, Office of the Quartermaster General, Washington, D.C. (1958)]

A typical menu included such canned items as butter-substitute spread, soluble coffee, pudding, meat units, jam, evaporated milk, and vegetables as well as biscuits, cereal, beverages, candy, salt, and sugar. Accessory items were cigarettes, matches, can opener, toilet paper, soap, towels, and water-purification (Halazone) tablets. The partial dinner unit was enclosed in a cellophane bag-in-carton for easy distribution to the individual soldier for his noontime meal. Within the unit were biscuits, a confection, beverage powder, sugar, gum, and a can opener. These items were provided on the theory that an individual "snack" was sufficient for midday meals, when there would be neither time nor opportunity to prepare the ration for group feeding. [Koehler, Franz A., "Special Rations for the Armed Forces: Army Operational Rations - A Historical Background", QMC Historical Studies, Historical Branch, Office of the Quartermaster General, Washington, D.C. (1958)]

The similarity of the partial unit to the K ration was a chief reason for the proposed revision of the 10-in-1 in 1945. The revised 10-in-1 was intended for use during and after the 1945 planned attack on Japan during World War II. It was planned to eliminate the unit ration concept, and to assemble the entire ration on the basis of three group meals rather than two group meals and one individual luncheon package. Although it was recognized that the over-all weight of the ration would be increased thereby, it was felt that the added weight would be offset by the increased acceptability and nutritional value which a greater variety of components would provide. The end of the war prevented realization of such a plan in the 10-in-1, leaving an over-abundance of surplus food. Through the form of CARE Packages, the humanitarian group CARE provided a means to transfer the ration surplus to those starving in Europe. Over 300 million rations, costing about 85 cents each, were procured under the 10-in-1 title from mid-1943 to the end of the World War II. No other group ration was procured during that period. Hence, in actuality as well as nomenclature, "Ration, 10-in-1" was the final small-group ration of World War II. [Koehler, Franz A., "Special Rations for the Armed Forces: Army Operational Rations - A Historical Background", QMC Historical Studies, Historical Branch, Office of the Quartermaster General, Washington, D.C. (1958)]

Contents

One 10-in-1 contained:
*one pound of beef in broth
*one pound of steak and kidneys
*8 ounces of liver loaf
*8 ounces of corned beef
*12 ounces of luncheon loaf (similar to Spam)
*8 ounces of bacon
*2 pounds of margarine
*one pound of lard
*one pound of fruit preserves
*one pound of honey
*one pound of raisins
*one pound of chocolate
*2 pounds of sugar
*8 ounces of egg powder
*2 pounds of KLIM whole-milk powder (1st issue)
*4 cans of evaporated milk (2nd issue)
*2 pounds of coffee

ee Also

*5-in-1 ration
*C ration
*Mountain ration

Notes


Wikimedia Foundation. 2010.

См. также в других словарях:

  • parcel — par|cel1 S3 [ˈpa:səl US ˈpa:r ] n ↑sticker, ↑string [Date: 1300 1400; : Old French; Origin: Latin particula; PARTICLE] 1.) especially BrE an object that has been wrapped in paper or put in a special envelope, especially so that it can be sent by… …   Dictionary of contemporary English

  • parcel — noun (esp. BrE) 1 something wrapped in paper, etc. ⇨ See also ↑package ADJECTIVE ▪ large ▪ little, small ▪ We left little parcels outside each person s door. ▪ brown paper …   Collocations dictionary

  • parcel — 01. The back of the car was full of Christmas [parcels]. 02. Do you have a piece of string I could use to tie up this [parcel]? 03. The mail truck was full of [parcels] for the Christmas season. 04. Can you mail this [parcel] for me when you go… …   Grammatical examples in English

  • parcel — [[t]pɑ͟ː(r)s(ə)l[/t]] parcels, parcelling, parcelled (in AM, use parceling, parceled) 1) N COUNT A parcel is something wrapped in paper, usually so that it can be sent to someone by post. [mainly BRIT] ...parcels of food and clothing... He had a… …   English dictionary

  • parcel — 1 noun (C) 1 especially BrE an object that has been wrapped in paper or put in a special envelope, especially so that it can be sent by mail; package 1 (1) AmE: She tied up the parcel with string. 2 an area of land that is part of a larger area… …   Longman dictionary of contemporary English

  • Food, functional — Functional foods are those foods that encompass potentially healthful products including any modified food or ingredient that may provide a health benefit beyond the traditional nutrients it contains, as defined by the Institute of Medicine.… …   Medical dictionary

  • parcel out — {v.} To give out in parts or shares; divide. * /He parceled out the remaining food to the workers./ …   Dictionary of American idioms

  • parcel out — {v.} To give out in parts or shares; divide. * /He parceled out the remaining food to the workers./ …   Dictionary of American idioms

  • Food, “super” — Foods with alleged healing or health promoting capabilities. The healing power of foods is a popular concept. Medicinal or nutritionally high powered foods have been part and parcel of the natural products industry for a long time and, through… …   Medical dictionary

  • parcel\ out — v To give out in parts or shares; divide. He parceled out the remaining food to the workers …   Словарь американских идиом


Поделиться ссылкой на выделенное

Прямая ссылка:
Нажмите правой клавишей мыши и выберите «Копировать ссылку»