Charles Townshend, 3rd Viscount Townshend


Charles Townshend, 3rd Viscount Townshend

Charles Townshend, 3rd Viscount Townshend (11 July 1700 – 12 March 1764), known as Lord Lynn from 1723 to 1738, was a British politician.

Townshend was the eldest son of the 2nd Viscount Townshend and was educated at Eton and King's College, Cambridge.[1] After graduating, he entered the Commons when he succeeded his uncle as Member of Parliament (MP) for Great Yarmouth in 1722. He held the seat until a year later, when he was summoned to the House of Lords through a writ of acceleration in his father's barony of Townshend. As his father was already Lord Townshend, Charles was styled Lord Lynn after the barony's territorial designation of Lynn Regis. Townshend then became Master of the Jewel Office and Lord Lieutenant of Norfolk in 1730 and succeeded to his father's titles in 1738.

On 29 May 1723, Townshend had married Audrey Harrison (the only daughter and heiress of Edward Harrison of Balls Park, Hertfordshire) and their surviving children were George, later Marquess Townshend (1724–1807) and Charles (1725–1767).

References

  1. ^ Townshend, Charles in Venn, J. & J. A., Alumni Cantabrigienses, Cambridge University Press, 10 vols, 1922–1958.
Political offices
Preceded by
Hon. James Brudenell
Master of the Jewel Office
1730 – 1739
Succeeded by
The Lord Bergavenny
Parliament of Great Britain
Preceded by
George England
Horatio Townshend
Member of Parliament for Great Yarmouth
1722 – 1723
With: Horatio Walpole
Succeeded by
Horatio Walpole
William Townshend
Honorary titles
Preceded by
The Viscount Townshend
Lord Lieutenant of Norfolk
1730 – 1738
Succeeded by
The Earl of Buckinghamshire
Peerage of England
Preceded by
Charles Townshend
Viscount Townshend
1738 – 1764
Succeeded by
George Townshend
Baron Townshend
(writ in acceleration)

1723 – 1764



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