Orchidometer


Orchidometer
A testicle is being measured with an orchidometer

An orchidometer (or orchiometer) is a medical instrument used to measure the volume of the testicles.

The orchidometer was introduced in 1966 by pediatric endocrinologist Prof. Dr. Dr. hc. Andrea Prader of the University of Zurich. It consists of a string of twelve numbered wooden or plastic beads of increasing size from about 1 to 25 millilitres. Doctors sometimes informally refer to them as "Prader's balls", "the medical worry beads", or the "endocrine rosary."

The beads are compared with the testicles of the patient, and the volume is read off the bead which matches most closely in size. Prepubertal sizes are 1–3 ml, pubertal sizes are considered 4 ml and up and adult sizes are 12–25 ml.

The orchidometer can be used to accurately determine size of testes. Discrepancy of testicular size with other parameters of maturation can be an important clue to various diseases. Small testes can indicate either primary or secondary hypogonadism. Testicular size can help distinguish between different types of precocious puberty. Since testicular growth is typically the first physical sign of true puberty, one of the most common uses is as confirmation that puberty is beginning in a boy with delay. Large testes (macroorchidism) can be a clue to one of the most common causes of mental retardation, fragile X syndrome.

Professor Stephen Shalet, a leading endocrinologist who works for the Christie Hospital in Manchester, is reported to have told The Observer, "Every endocrinologist should have an orchidometer. It's his stethoscope."

Orchidometers are also commonly used to measure testicular volume in rams.

Further reading

  • Prader, A., "Testicular size: Assessment and clinical importance", Triangle, 1966, vol. 7, pp. 240 - 243
  • Taranger, J., Engström, I., Lichtensten, H., Svenberg-Redegren, I., "Somatic Pubertal Development", Acta Pediatr. Scand. Suppl. 1976, vol. 258, pp. 121 - 135

External links


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Look at other dictionaries:

  • orchidometer — 1. A caliper device used to measure the size of testes. 2. A set of sized models of testes for comparison of testicular development. [orchido + G. metron, measure] * * * n. a calliper device for measuring the size of the testicles. The Prader… …   Medical dictionary

  • orchidometer — n. a calliper device for measuring the size of the testicles. The Prader orchidometer consists of a collection of testicle shaped beads of different sizes, each of known volume, for direct comparison to and sizing of the testicles. It enables the …   The new mediacal dictionary

  • orchidometer — noun medical instrument used to measure the volume of the testicles …   Wiktionary

  • Orchidometer — Orchido|me̱ter [↑Orchis u. ↑...meter] s; s, : Schablone zur Bestimmung des Hodenvolumens …   Das Wörterbuch medizinischer Fachausdrücke

  • orchidometer — instrument for measuring the size of the testicles Scientific Instruments …   Phrontistery dictionary

  • Prader orchidometer — see orchidometer * * * a string of plastic models of testes, marked according to their volume in cubic centimeters; used for measuring the size of the testes either in growing boys or in men who have an abnormal condition or have had a procedure… …   Medical dictionary

  • Prader orchidometer — see orchidometer …   The new mediacal dictionary

  • Testicle — Diagram of male (human) testicles …   Wikipedia

  • List of sexology topics — This is a list of topics related to sexology, human sexuality and marriage customs, and related topics such as human sexual anatomy, reproductive biology, andrology, gynaecology, obstetrics and, where relevant, anthropology. Note that this list… …   Wikipedia

  • Andrea Prader — (* 23. Dezember 1919 in Samedan, Graubünden; † 3. Juni 2001 in Zürich) war ein Schweizer Kinderarzt und Endokrinologe. Inhaltsverzeichnis 1 Leben 2 Forschungsgebiete …   Deutsch Wikipedia


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