Clubroot


Clubroot
This article is about disease. For the musician, see Clubroot (musician).
Clubroot on cauliflower

Clubroot is a common disease of cabbages, radishes, turnips and other plants belonging to the family Cruciferae (mustard family). It is caused by Plasmodiophora brassicae, which was once considered a slime mold but is now put in the group Phytomyxea. It has as many as nine races. Gall formation or distortion takes place on latent roots and gives the shape of a club or spindle. In the cabbage such attacks on the roots cause undeveloped heads or a failure to head at all, followed often by decline in vigor or by death. It is an important disease, affecting an estimated 10% of the total cultured area worldwide.

Historical reports of clubroot date back to the 13th century in Europe. In the late 19th century, a severe epidemic of clubroot destroyed large proportions of the cabbage crop in St. Petersburg. The Russian scientist Mikhail Woronin eventually identified the cause of clubroot as a "plasmodiophorous organism" in 1875, and gave it the name Plasmodiophora brassicae.

In 18th, 19th and early 20th century Britain clubroot was sometimes called finger and toe, fingers and toes, anbury, or ambury, these last two also meaning a soft tumor on a horse.

The potential of cultural practices to reduce crop losses due to clubroot are limited, and chemical treatments to control the fungus are either banned due to environmental regulations or are not cost effective. Breeding of resistant cultivars therefore is a promising alternative.

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External links



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Look at other dictionaries:

  • clubroot — /klub rooht , root /, n. Plant Pathol. a disease of cabbage and other cruciferous plants, characterized by enlarged, malformed roots, caused by a slime mold, Plasmodiophora brassicae. [1840 50; CLUB + ROOT1] * * * ▪ plant disease       disease of …   Universalium

  • clubroot — noun Date: 1846 a disease of cruciferous plants (as cabbage) caused by a slime mold (Plasmodiophora brassicae) producing swellings or distortions of the root …   New Collegiate Dictionary

  • clubroot — noun a) A common disease of cabbages, radishes, turnips and other plants of the Cruciferae, caused by Plasmodiophora brassicae, in which galls form on latent roots, rendering them clublike. b) A root thus affected …   Wiktionary

  • clubroot — n. disease that affects plant roots (such as cabbages, turnips etc.) in which the root becomes swollen and deformed …   English contemporary dictionary

  • clubroot — noun a fungal disease of cabbages, turnips, etc. in which the root becomes swollen and distorted …   English new terms dictionary

  • clubroot — club•root [[t]ˈklʌbˌrut, ˌrʊt[/t]] n. ppa a disease of plants of the cabbage family characterized by swollen roots, caused by a slime mold Plasmodiophora brassicae[/ex] • Etymology: 1840–50 …   From formal English to slang

  • clubroot — ˈ ̷ ̷ˌ ̷ ̷ noun ( s) Etymology: club (I) + root : a common disease of cabbages and related plants caused by a slime mold (Plasmodiophora brassicae) producing swellings or distortions of the root followed often by decline in vigor or by death …   Useful english dictionary

  • Clubroot (musician) — Clubroot Birth name Dan Richmond Born ca. 1985 Origin St Albans, England Genres Dubstep, UK garage Occupations …   Wikipedia

  • clubroot fungus — noun a fungus resembling slime mold that causes swellings or distortions of the roots of cabbages and related plants • Syn: ↑Plasmodiophora brassicae • Hypernyms: ↑fungus • Member Holonyms: ↑Plasmodiophora, ↑genus Plasmodiophora …   Useful english dictionary

  • plant disease — ▪ plant pathology Introduction       an impairment of the normal state of a plant that interrupts or modifies its vital functions.       All species of plants, wild and cultivated alike, are subject to disease. Although each species is… …   Universalium


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