Product-Market Growth Matrix


Product-Market Growth Matrix

The Ansoff Product-Market Growth Matrix is a marketing tool created by Igor Ansoff and first published in his article "Strategies for Diversification" in the Harvard Business Review (1957). The matrix allows marketers to consider ways to grow the business via existing and/or new products, in existing and/or new markets – there are four possible product/market combinations. This matrix helps companies decide what course of action should be taken given current performance. The matrix consists of four strategies:

*Market penetration (existing markets, existing products): Market penetration occurs when a company enters/penetrates a market with current products. The best way to achieve this is by gaining competitors' customers (part of their market share). Other ways include attracting non-users of your product or convincing current clients to use more of your product/service, with advertising or other promotions. Market penetration is the least risky way for a company to grow.
* Product development (existing markets, new products): A firm with a market for its current products might embark on a strategy of developing other products catering to the same market. For example, McDonalds is always within the fast-food industry, but frequently markets new burgers. Frequently, when a firm creates new products, it can gain new customers for these products. Hence, new product development can be a crucial business development strategy for firms to stay competitive.
* Market development (new markets, existing products): An established product in the marketplace can be tweaked or targeted to a different customer segment, as a strategy to earn more revenue for the firm. For example, Lucozade was first marketed for sick children and then rebranded to target athletes. This is a good example developing a new market for an existing product.
* Diversification (new markets, new products): Virgin Cola, Virgin Megastores, Virgin Airlines, Virgin Telecommunications are examples of new products created by the Virgin Group of UK, to leverage the "Virgin" brand. This resulted in the company entering new markets where it had no presence before.

The matrix illustrates [Mercer, D., "Marketing", http://futureobservatory.dyndns.org ] , in particular, that the element of risk increases the further the strategy moves away from known quantities - the existing product and the existing market. Thus, product development (requiring, in effect, a new product) and market extension (a new market) typically involve a greater risk than `penetration' (existing product and existing market); and diversification (new product and new market) generally carries the greatest risk of all. In his original work [Ansoff, I., Strategies for Diversification, "Harvard Business Review", Vol. 35 Issue 5, Sep-Oct 1957, pp.113-124] , which did not use the matrix form, Igor Ansoff stressed that the diversification strategy stood apart from the other three.

While the latter are usually followed with the same technical, financial, and merchandising resources which are used for the original product line, diversification usually requires new skills, new techniques, and new facilities. As a result it almost invariably leads to physical and organizational changes in the structure of the business which represent a distinct break with past business experience.

For this reason, most marketing activity revolves around penetration; and the Ansoff Matrix, despite its fame, is usually of limited value - although it does always offer a useful reminder of the options which are open.

References

External links

* [http://www.market-modelling.co.uk/Matrix/MATRIX_Step02_2.htm Software which utilises the Ansoff Matrix]


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