John Francis Hylan


John Francis Hylan
John Francis Hylan
Born April 20, 1868
Hunter, New York
Died January 12, 1936
Forest Hills, New York
Cause of death Heart attack
Education New York Law School (1897)
Net worth $5,000 (1936)
Title Mayor of New York City
Term 1918-1925
Predecessor John Purroy Mitchel
Successor James J. Walker
Political party Democrat
Religion Roman Catholic

John Francis Hylan (April 20, 1868 – January 12, 1936), nicknamed "Red Mike", was the Mayor of New York City from 1918 to 1925.

Contents

Biography

Hylan was born in Hunter, New York a town in upstate Greene County where his family owned a farm. Hylan married young, became dissatisfied with farm life and moved to Brooklyn with his bride, and enrolled at New York Law School in Manhattan. He found work on the Brooklyn Union Elevated Railroad and rose through the ranks to become a locomotive engineer. Ambitious, he studied law even as he worked on the railroad. He was fired after allegedly taking a curve too fast, endangering a supervisor who had been preparing to cross a track. Hylan always contended that he was wrongfully discharged (Some versions of the story have him reading his law book at the same time as driving).

He was a long-time resident of the Bushwick neighborhood of Brooklyn.[1]

Despite his industriousness, he was described, even by his friends, as a mediocre intellect. Nevertheless, he became a judge in the Kings County (Brooklyn) county court and was in that position when he was tapped by Tammany Hall as a dark-horse candidate for Mayor, running as a Democrat, through the promotion of newspaper magnate William Randolph Hearst, who shared with him a desire for municipal ownership of utilities.

Hylan defeated the reformer John Purroy Mitchel in the 1917 mayoral election, restoring the power of Tammany at City Hall. He easily won re-election in 1921 but was defeated for re-nomination in 1925 by State Senator James J. "Jimmy" Walker. Walker later appointed Hylan to the municipal judiciary.

As mayor, Hylan railed against "the interests" and put in motion the building of a publicly owned and operated subway system, which became the IND division of the New York City Subway.

Death

Hylan died of a heart attack at the age of 67 on January 12, 1936 at his home in Forest Hills, Queens.[2][3] He left an estate of less than $5,000 in personal property and he owned no real estate.[4]

Quotes

Hylan's most famous words against "the interests" was the following speech, made in 1922, while he was the sitting Mayor of New York City (1917–25):[citation needed]

'The real menace of our Republic is the invisible government, which like a giant octopus sprawls its slimy legs over our cities, states and nation. To depart from mere generalizations, let me say that at the head of this octopus are the Rockefeller-Standard Oil interests and a small group of powerful banking houses generally referred to as the international bankers. The little coterie of powerful international bankers virtually run the United States government for their own selfish purposes.
‘They practically control both parties, write political platforms, make catspaws of party leaders, use the leading men of private organizations, and resort to every device to place in nomination for high public office only such candidates as will be amenable to the dictates of corrupt big business.
‘These international bankers and Rockefeller-Standard Oil interests control the majority of the newspapers and magazines in this country. They use the columns of these papers to club into submission or drive out of office public officials who refuse to do the bidding of the powerful corrupt cliques which compose the invisible government. It operates under cover of a self-created screen [and] seizes our executive officers, legislative bodies, schools, courts, newspapers and every agency created for the public protection.

This "invisible government", Hylan and others - William Jennings Bryan, Charles Lindbergh Sr. (R-MN) - argued, exercised its control of the US Government through the Federal Reserve.[citation needed]

Cultural references

Hylan attending the 1920 World Series at Ebbets Field.

In the first issue of The New Yorker (February 21, 1925), a humor piece on the history of New York refers to John F. Hylan as "Jonef Hylan":

The next great figure in the early legends of New York is that of Jonef Hylan. Hylan, in all probability, was not a real person; but it is impossible to understand New York without giving careful study to the Hylan myth. In many respects, it resembles the Sun Myth of other great civilizations; for his head was as a head of flame, and he rose early each morning from beyond the East River, bringing light into all the dark places and heat into the sessions of the Board of Estimate. The populace called their Sun God "Red Mike"; but in the frenzy of their devotions, they simply yelled "Ra! Ra!"

He is then characterized as a "Champion of the People versus the Interests," which are "not people." Satan, it says, was behind the Interests, but William Randolph Hearst was behind Hylan, "and that evened things up".

In the April issue of the New Yorker the same year a cartoon by Alfred Frueh shows firefighters carrying people from a burning building wearing placards with notices such as "This lucky man is being rescued by MAYOR HYLAN'S firemen".

Legacy

Southfield Avenue on Staten Island was named Hylan Boulevard in his memory. A bust honoring Mayor Hylan may be seen in the Monday Room at Public Restaurant in New York.

References

  1. ^ " Regional Plan Group Finds Geographic Center Is Far From Population Center", The New York Times, March 26, 1937. Accessed June 8, 2009. "Its best known resident in recent years was former Mayor John F. Hylan, who lived on Bushwick Avenue."
  2. ^ "John F. Hylan Dies Suddenly Of Heart Attack. Former New York Mayor Achieved Fame in His 5-Cent Fare Fight.". Washington Post. January 13, 1936. "John F. Hylan, a farm boy, who parlayed $1.50 into a comfortable fortune and twice was elected Mayor of New York, died early today at his home in Forest Hills, Long Island, of heart disease. He was 68 years old." 
  3. ^ "Ex-mayor Hylan Dies Suddenly of Heart Attack. Stricken After Retiring in His Forest Hills Home, Succumbs Within a Few Minutes. Mayor from 1918 to 1925. An Up-State Farm Boy With Little Schooling, He Studied Law While Working.". New York Times. January 12, 1936. http://select.nytimes.com/gst/abstract.html?res=F00B16FA3455147B93C0A8178AD85F428385F9. Retrieved 2008-06-30. "Former Mayor John F. Hylan died of a heart attack about 1:15 o'clock this morning in his residence at 2 Olive Place, Forest Hills, Queens. He was in his sixty-eighth year." 
  4. ^ "Hylan's Estate is Under $5,000; Former Mayor Left His Entire Property, in Which There Was No Realty, to Widow.". New York Times. January 23, 1936. "Former Mayor John F. Hylan, who died Jan. 12, left an estate of less than $5,000 in personal property and no real property, it was revealed yesterday when his will was filed for probate. The testament directs that all of his estate go to his widow, Mrs. Miriam L. Hylan, of 2 Olive Place, Forest Hills, who is named executrix." 
Political offices
Preceded by
John Purroy Mitchel
Mayor of New York City
1918—1925
Succeeded by
James J. Walker

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