Predicate

Predicate

Predicate or predication may refer to:

*Predicate (mathematics), a relation, or the boolean-valued characteristic function or indicator function of a relation
*Predicate (logic), a fundamental concept in first-order logic
**in Bertrand Russell's theory of types, an act of typing: that is, assigning a type
*Syntactic predicate, specifies the syntactic validity of applying a production
*Predicate (grammar), the rest of a sentence apart from the subject
*Branch predication (computer programming), a choice to execute or not to execute a given instruction based on the content of a machine register
*in Resource Description Framework, a trait or aspect about that resource that is being described


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Синонимы:

См. также в других словарях:

  • Predicate — Pred i*cate, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Predicated}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Predicating}.] [L. praedicatus, p. p. of praedicare to cry in public, to proclaim. See {Preach}.] 1. To assert to belong to something; to affirm (one thing of another); as, to… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • predicate — [pred′i kāt΄; ] for n. [ & ] adj. [, pred′ikit] vt. predicated, predicating [L praedicatus, pp. of praedicare: see PREACH] 1. Obs. to proclaim; preach; declare; affirm 2. a) to affirm as a quality, attribute, or property of a person or thing …   English World dictionary

  • predicate — pred·i·cate 1 / pre də ˌkāt/ vt cat·ed, cat·ing: to set or ground on something: find a basis for usu. used with on if Mary s claim is predicated simply on John s duty of support W. M. McGovern, Jr. et al. pred·i·cate 2 / pre di kət/ adj: rela …   Law dictionary

  • Predicate — Pred i*cate, n. [L. praedicatum, neut. of praedicatus, p. p. praedicare: cf. F. pr[ e]dicat. See {Predicate}, v. t.] 1. (Logic) That which is affirmed or denied of the subject. In these propositions, Paper is white, Ink is not white, whiteness is …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • predicate — and predict are distantly related but their meanings are distinct. The primary meaning of predict is ‘to foretell’, whereas the primary use of predicate is followed by on in the meaning ‘to found or base (on a principle or assumption)’: That s a… …   Modern English usage

  • predicate — ► NOUN 1) Grammar the part of a sentence or clause containing a verb and stating something about the subject (e.g. went home in John went home). 2) Logic something which is affirmed or denied concerning an argument of a proposition. ► VERB 1)… …   English terms dictionary

  • Predicate — Pred i*cate, a. [L. praedicatus, p. p.] Predicated. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Predicate — Pred i*cate, v. i. To affirm something of another thing; to make an affirmation. Sir M. Hale. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • predicate — (n.) 1530s, a term in logic, from L. praedicatum that which is said of the subject, properly neut. pp. of praedicare assert, proclaim, declare publicly, from prae forth, before (see PRE (Cf. pre )) + dicare proclaim, from stem of dicere to speak …   Etymology dictionary

  • predicate — vb affirm, declare, profess, *assert, aver, protest, avouch, avow, warrant …   New Dictionary of Synonyms


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