List of tautological place names


List of tautological place names

A place name is tautological if two parts of it are synonymous. This often occurs when a name from one language is imported into another and a standard descriptor is added on from the second language. Thus, for example, New Zealand's Mount Maunganui, where "maunga" is Māori for mountain. The following list is of place names often used tautologically, plus the languages from which the non-English name elements have originally come.

Since there are sometimes many similar names in one area in many cases where two languages are in common use, this should be noted with one exemplar case.

Rivers

* River Avon, various in England and Scotland (River River - Brythonic (spelled "Afon" in modern Welsh), or Goidelic "abhainn") [Victor Wadds, ed., "The Cmabridge Dictionary of English Place Names", 2004, s.n. River AVON]
* River Avonmore, County Wicklow, Ireland (Big River River - Irish: "Abhainn Mór")
* River Avonbeg, County Wicklow, Ireland (Small River River - Irish: "Abhainn Beag")
* River Awbeg, County Cork, Ireland (Small River River - Irish: "Abhainn Beag")
* Connecticut River, United States (Long Tidal River River - Algonquin)
* Cuyahoga River, Ohio ("Cuyahoga" means "crooked river" in a Native American language.)
* Fishkill Creek, New York, USA (small waterway small waterway - kill come from Dutch)
* Río Guadix, Spain (River River River - "Río" is "river" in Spanish, "Guad < wādĩ" is "river" in Arabic and "Ix" is "river" in Phoenician)
* Río Guadalquivir, Spain (River River River - as the former and "Ibr" is supposedly "river" in Iberian language, word that is cognate of the Ebro river Fact|date=March 2008)
* Hatchie River, United States (River River - "hatchie" meaning "river" in Muskogean languages)
* Heilongjiang River, China (Black Dragon River River - Mandarin Chinese)
* River Humber, England, and Humber River, Ontario, Canada (River River - Brythonic)
* Kymijoki, Finland (River River)
* Mississippi River, United States, and Mississippi River, Ontario, Canada (Big River River - Algonquin)
* Paraguay River, Guarani (From the Great River River)
* Rillito River, southern Arizona, United States (Little River River - Spanish)
* Schuylkill River, eastern Pennsylvania (Hidden River River - the suffix "kill" in Dutch meaning "river")
* Skookumchuck River, Washington, United States - the suffix "chuck" in Chinook Jargon meaning "river"
* River Tyne, England (River River - Brythonic)
* Vaslui River, Romania - "uj" meant "body of water" in Cuman
* Walla Walla River, Washington, United States (Little River River; "Walla" means "river" in Sahaptin, repeated to express the diminutive ("little river"))
* Latsa erreka (tributary of the Nive), France (Brook Brook - Euskara)

Lakes and other bodies of water

* Dal Lake, Kashmir - (Lake Lake- Balti)
* Gaube Lake, Hautes-Pyrénées (Lake Lake - French and Gascon)
* Hayle Estuary: Cornwall (Estuary Estuary - Cornish "Heyl" "estuary")
* Jaurajärvi and Jaurakkajärvi, Finland (Lake Lake - Sami "javri" "lake", Finnish "järvi" "lake".)
* Lake Issyk-Kul, Kyrgyzstan (Lake Hot Lake - Kyrgyz)
* Lagos Lagoon, Nigeria - 'lagos' is Portuguese for 'lakes', and 'lagoon' derives from Latin 'lacus' "lake, pond"
* Laguna de Bay, Philippines - also referred to as "Laguna Lake" (Lake Lake - Spanish)
* Lake Lagunita, Stanford, California (Lake Little Lake - Spanish)
* Lake Nyassa (now called Lake Malawi), Malawi/Mozambique (Lake Lake - Yao)
* Lake Rotorua, New Zealand (Lake Lake Second - Māori. Many other New Zealand lakes have the tautological "Lake Roto-" form)
* Lake Tahoe, Nevada/California (Lake the lake - Washo Native American Tribal language)
* Lake Windermere, England (Vinund's lake lake - Old Norse. Several other English lakes have the tautological "Lake -mere" form)
* Lakeville Lake, Michigan, USA - The village is Lakeville, the adjacent lake is Lakeville Lake.
* Loch Loch, Scotland. Not to be confused with Loch Lochy.
* Loch Lomond Lake, near Saint John, New Brunswick, Canada.
* Loch Watten, Scotland, from Gaelic "loch", plus Norse "vatn"
* Loughrigg Tarn, from Gaelic "loch", plus Norse "ridge", and "tarn" meaning a body of water
* Tal-y-Llyn lake, Wales (End-of the-lake lake - llyn is Welsh for lake)
* Østensjøvann is a Norwegian lake name that concatenates "sjø" ("lake that is not as narrow as a fjord") and "vann" ("lake"). Similarly Møsvann in Telemark, Norway combines "mjøsa" meaning lake with "vann" meaning lake.
* Vatnvatnet, Norway (Lakelake - Norwegian), a lake near Bodø
* Wast Water, England - 'water's valley water' from Old Norse "vatns dalr" (= Wasdale) and Old English "wæter".

Mountains and hills

*Bergeberget, Norway (The Hill Hill - Norwegian)
*Bredon, England (Hill Hill - Celtic/Saxon)
*Bredon Hill, England (Hill Hill Hill - Brythonic/Old English/Modern English)
*Breedon on the Hill, England (Hill Hill on the Hill - Celtic/Saxon)
*Brill, England (Hill Hill - Celtic/Saxon) - also once known in documents as "Brill-super-montem" (Hill Hill on the Hill - Celtic/Saxon/Latin)
*Brincliffe Edge, Sheffield, UK (Burning Hill Hill Welsh/English)
*Bryn Glas Hill, Wales (Blue Hill Hill - Welsh/English)
*Brynhill, Wales (Hill Hill - Welsh/English)
*Djebel Amour, Algeria: (Arabic & Tamazight)
*Eizmendi: Haitz Mendi 'mount mount' (Euskara)
*Filefjell, Norway (The mountain mountain - Norwegian)
*Fjällfjällen, Sweden (The mountain mountains - Swedish)
*Garmendia: Garr- Mendi(a) (fossil & modern Basque)
* Hill Mountain, Pembrokeshire, Wales
*Knockhill, a common placename in the Scottish Lowlands, deriving from either Scottish Gaelic, "cnoc" meaning a "hill" or a similar word originating in either Danish or one of the West Germanic languages that predated Old English.
*Montcuq, Lot, France: Mont Kukk 'mount mount'
*Mongibellu, Sicilian name of the volcano Etna, in Sicily, Italy (Mountain Mountain, from Romance "monte" and Arabic "žabal").
*Mount Katahdin, Maine (Mount The Greatest Mountain - English/Penobscot)
*Mount Maunganui, New Zealand (Mount Mount Big - Māori)
*Ochil Hills, Scotland (Hill hills)
*Pendle Hill, Lancashire, England. (Hill Hill Hill) - "Pen" -(Cumbric language) and the suffix "dle" from the Old English language.
*Pic de la Munia in Piau-Engaly, France: Pic Muño (Romance & Euskara)
*Summit Peak, New Zealand (Peak Peak - both English) - also the U.S. has five hills called Summit Peak.
*Slieve Mish Mountains and Slieve Bloom Mountains, Ireland - (Mish Mountain Mountains, Bloom Mountain Mountains - from sliabh, the Gaelic word for mountain)
*Table Mesa, Colorado (Table Table - Spanish)
*Torpenhow Hill, England (Hill Hill Hill Hill - SW-English (Tor) / Brythonic ("pen" = "head") / Anglo-Saxon "hōh" = "spur of high ground" / English ("hill")
*Tuc de la Pale, Ariège, France: Tuk Pal 'mount mount'
*Vignemale, Pyrenees: Went- Mal 'mount mount'

Islands

*Canvey Island, UK (Cana's island island - Anglo-Saxon)
*Dodecanese Islands, Aegean Sea (Twelve Islands Islands - Greek; usually called just Dodecanese)
*Faroe Islands, North Atlantic (Sheep Islands Islands - Faroese)
*Gili Islands, North-west of Lombok, Indonesia (Island Islands - Sasak)
*Indonesian Islands, usually just called Indonesia
*Isle of Sheppey, UK (Island of sheep island - Saxon)
*Lundy Island, UK (puffin island island - Norse)
*Melanesian Islands, Pacific Ocean (Black Islands Islands - Greek; usually called just Melanesia)
*Motutapu Island, New Zealand (Island Sacred Island - Māori)
*Polynesian Islands, Pacific Ocean (Many Islands Islands - Greek; usually called just Polynesia)

Other

*Ardtornish Point, Scotland (High/Heights Tor Point Point) - "Aird" from Gaelic, "Nish" from the Norse "Ness" and "Point" from English - all referring to some form of cape, point or headland).
*Barna Gap, Ireland - (Gap Gap - Barna is the Gaelic word for a mountain gap)
*Beechhurst Holt Wood, England (beech wood wood wood - Anglo-Saxon)
*Beqaa Valley - biqāʻa, plural of buqʻaht, is Arabic for 'plain' (another "Valley Valley")
*Carmarthen, Wales (Welsh : "Caerfyddin") - (Fort fort by the sea - "Caer"/"Car" = Welsh for fort (from Latin "castra"), "marthen"/"m(f)yrddin" is Welsh name derived from Latin Moridunum, which itself derived from Brythonic "môr" (sea) and "din"/"dun" (fort)) [Hywel Wyn Jones, "The Place-Names of Wales", 1998]
*Cartagena, Spain - (New New City - from Latin "Carthago Nova", 'New Carthage'; but "Carthago" itself is from Phoenician " _ph. Qart-ḥadašt", 'New City')
*Châteaudun, France (Castle Stronghold - French and Gaulish)
*Col de Port, Ariège, France (Pass Pass - French and Occitan)
*Côtes-d'Armor, Brittany, France (Coast of Coast - French and Breton)
*Eas Fors Waterfall on the Isle of Mull in Scotland (waterfall waterfall waterfall)
*El Camino Way in Palo Alto, California (The way way - Spanish)
*El Puente de Alcántara, Toledo, Spain, (The Bridge of the Bridge - "Puente" from Spanish, "Alcántara" from Arabic al-qanṭaraht 'the bridge')
*Glendale - Anglicisation of the Gaelic "Gleann Dail". "Gleann" simply means "valley", and "dail" is a borrowing from the Norse for "valley", which in Gaelic specifically means a valley containing fertile arable land, or any low-lying farmland. The anglicised form appears more tautological as the word "dale" in English is used to describe any valley.
*Gobi Desert, central Asia (Very large and dry desert, Gobi means 'very large and dry' in Mongolian)
*Jiayuguan Pass - (Jiayu Pass Pass - Mandarin Chinese)
*The La Brea Tar Pits, California (The The Tar Tar Pits - Spanish)
*Lee Mead - (Meadow Meadow)
*Milky Way Galaxy (Milky Way milky way — Greek; for this reason some scientists, such as the late Isaac Asimov, have argued that the Milky Way should be renamed the "Home Galaxy" or some such.)
*Nathu La Pass, Indo-China border, (Listening Ears Pass Pass- Tibetan)
*Nesoddtangen, Norway - (The Cape cape cape, Norwegian, from "nes" (promontory or cape), "odde" (promontory or cape) and "tange" (promontory or cape))
*Nyanza Lac, Burundi - ("Nyanza" and "Lac" are the Bantu and French words for "lake" respectively. Interestingly, Nyanza Lac is not a lake - it's a city)
*Sahara desert, Africa (Deserts desert - Arabic)
*Sharm Old Harbour (a common English name for the old harbour at Sharm el Sheikh) (harbour old harbour - Arabic)
*The Rock of Gibraltar - (The Rock of The Rock of Ṭariq "žabal ṭariq" - Arabic)
*Timor-Leste, East Timor, (East East - Indonesian/Malay, Portuguese) - Note: this is the eastern half of an island that is the easternmost major island in its chain.
*Trendle Ring earthwork in Somerset, England (Circle Circle)
*Val d'Aran, Spain (Valley Valley - Gascon and Euskara (Basque))
*Vista View Elementary School, Minnesota (View View Elementary School - Spanish)

References

ee also

*Pleonasm
*RAS syndrome


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