Grand Slam (tennis)


Grand Slam (tennis)

The four Major tennis tournaments, also called the Slams,[1] are the most important tennis events of the year in terms of world tour ranking points, tradition, prize-money awarded, strength and size of player field, and public attention. They are the Australian Open, the French Open, Wimbledon, and the US Open. Currently, both the Australian Open and the US Open are played on hard courts, while the French Open is played on clay, and Wimbledon is played on grass. The "Grand Slam" is the winning of all four Major tournaments in a single calendar year[2][3][4][5][6]; however, it has also been used for many years now to refer to any of the major tournaments,[7] (e.g., American tennis player Pete Sampras, who won 14 Major titles in his career, is often said to have won 14 "Grand Slams"—even though he did not achieve a true Grand Slam by winning all four Majors in a single year).

The Open Era of tennis began in 1968 when the Major tournaments agreed to allow professional players to compete. Wimbledon, the oldest of the Majors, was founded in 1877, followed by the US Open in 1881, the French Open in 1891, and the Australian Open in 1905. Beginning in 1905 and continuing to the present day, all four majors have been played yearly, with the exception of the two World Wars and 1986 for the Australian Open. The Australian Open is the 1st Major of the year (January), followed by the French Open (May–June), Wimbledon (June–July), and US Open (August–September).

A player who wins all four major tournaments, as a single or as part of a doubles team, in the same calendar year is said to have achieved the "Grand Slam". If the player wins all four consecutively, but not in the same calendar year, it is called a "Non-Calendar Year Grand Slam". Winning all four at some point in a career, even if not consecutively, is referred to as a "Career Grand Slam". Winning the four Majors and a gold medal in tennis at the Summer Olympics has been called a "Golden Slam" since 1988,[8] when Steffi Graf became the only person to accomplish that feat in a single calendar year. Winning all four plus gold at some point in a career, even if not consecutively, is referred to as a "Career Golden Slam". Winning the four Majors in all three disciplines a player is eligible for – singles, doubles, and mixed doubles – is considered winning a "boxed set" of Grand Slam titles.

Contents

Yearly Logistics (2011)

Yearly Grand Slam (tennis) Calendar – the dates that each tournament took place in 2010

Australian Open
Tournament Dates: 17 – 30 January
Venue: Melbourne Park, Melbourne
Current Men's Single Champion: Novak Djokovic
Current Women's Single Champion: Kim Clijsters

French Open
Tournament Dates: 22 May – 5 June
Venue: Roland Garros, Paris
Current Men's Single Champion: Rafael Nadal
Current Women's Single Champion: Li Na

Wimbledon Championship
Tournament Dates: 20 June – 3 July
Venue: All England Tennis Club, London
Current Men's Single Champion: Novak Djokovic
Current Women's Single Champion: Petra Kvitová

US Open
Tournament Dates: 29 August – 12 September
Venue: USTA Billie Jean King National Tennis Center, New York
Current Men's Single Champion: Novak Djokovic
Current Women's Single Champion: Samantha Stosur

History

Used in golf since 1930, the term Grand Slam was first applied to tennis by New York Times columnist John Kieran according to Total Tennis, The Ultimate Tennis Encyclopedia by Bud Collins. In the chapter about 1933, Collins writes that after the Australian player Jack Crawford had won the Australian, French, and Wimbledon Championships, speculation arose about his chances in the U.S. Championships. Kieran, who was a bridge player, wrote: "If Crawford wins, it would be something like scoring a grand slam on the courts, doubled and vulnerable." Crawford, an asthmatic, won two of the first three sets of his finals match against Fred Perry, then tired in the heat and lost the last two sets and the match.

Grand Slam

The possibility of a Grand Slam did not exist until 1925, when the International Lawn Tennis Federation designated the Australian, French, British and American tournaments as the four Majors.

The first definitive single season Grand Slam was accomplished when Don Budge won all four men's singles Majors in 1938. To the end of the 2010 season, 14 players have completed a single season Grand Slam.

Of these players, two have multiple single season Grand Slams: Rod Laver accomplished the feat twice; Margaret Court accomplished the feat three times, in two different disciplines – once in women's singles and twice in mixed doubles.

The four Junior disciplines, boy's/girl's singles and doubles, provide limited opportunities to achieve a Grand Slam. Players are only eligible from age 13 through 18, with 18 year olds likely to hold a physical advantage. Only Stefan Edberg has completed the Grand Slam in a Junior discipline.

Men's singles

  • Don Budge (1938)
    • Note: Budge won 6 consecutive major titles from 1937 Wimbledon to 1938 U.S. Championships.

Women's singles

  • Maureen Connolly Brinker (1953)
    • Note: 6 consecutive major titles, 1952 Wimbledon through the 1953 U.S. Championships.
  • Margaret Court (1970)
    • Note: 6 consecutive major titles, 1969 US Open through the 1971 Australian Open
  • Steffi Graf (1988)
    • Note: 5 consecutive major titles, 1988 Australian Open through the 1989 Australian Open
    • Note: Graf also won the Olympic gold medal in 1988 (The "Golden" Grand Slam)

Men's doubles

Women's doubles

(Note: In 1986, Martina Navratilova won every major doubles title available – with Andrea Temesvári at the French Championships, then Pam Shriver at Wimbledon and the US Open. The Australian Championships were not played in 1986 but Navratilova won both the December 1985 and the January 1987 tournaments.)

Mixed doubles

(Note: In 1985, Martina Navratilova won every major mixed doubles title available – the French Open and the US Open with Heinz Gunthardt and Wimbledon with Paul McNamee. She could not complete the Grand Slam because the Australian Open mixed doubles championships were not played from 1970 until 1987.)

Boys' singles

Non-calendar year Grand Slam (reigning champion of all four majors, spanning two years)

In 1982 the International Tennis Federation (ITF) redefined the Grand Slam as four consecutive victories that could span two calendar years.[9] As defined in the constitution of the ITF: "The Grand Slam titles are the championships of Australia, France, the United States of America and Wimbledon. Players who hold all four of these titles at the same time achieve the Grand Slam".[10] As this definition differs from the original definition of the Grand Slam as restricted to a single calendar year, there has been some controversy towards this redefinition in the tennis world.[11][12]

The first player to be designated a non-calendar year Grand Slam winner was Martina Navratilova, when she won the 1984 French Open to make her the reigning champion of all four women's singles Majors, winning the $1 million Grand Slam bonus in recognition of her achievement.[9]

To the end of the 2010 season, only 7 players have completed a non-calendar year Grand Slam.

Of these players, three have multiple non-calendar year Grand Slams: Natasha Zvereva accomplished the feat twice; Martina Navratilova and Serena Williams have each accomomplished the feat in two different disciplines – once each in women's singles and once each in women's doubles.

Counting the ITF's expanded definition of a Grand Slam (single year and non-calendar year), the total number of players to achieve the feat only expands to 18, with Steffi Graf and Pam Shriver now counted as two time winners (and Martina Navratilova expanding to three total).

No male players have accomplished a non-calendar year grand slam, making Laver the most recent male grand-slammer even by this more relaxed definition. Todd Woodbridge and Mark Woodforde reached the final of the 1997 French Open holding all the other three titles, but lost to Yevgeny Kafelnikov and Daniel Vacek; in singles, Roger Federer repeated this in 2006 and 2007, ultimately losing both Paris finals to Rafael Nadal.

Women's singles

  • Martina Navratilova (1983–84)
    • Note: Navratilova won 6 consecutive major titles from 1983 Wimbledon to US Open 1984.
    • Note: The Australian Open was held in December from 1982 to 1985 and was thus the last Major of the calendar year.
  • Steffi Graf (1993–94)
    • Her streak was: 1993 French Open, Wimbledon, US Open, and the 1994 Australian Open.
  • Serena Williams (2002–03)
    • Her streak was: 2002 French Open, Wimbledon, US Open, and the 2003 Australian Open..

Women's doubles

  • Pam Shriver and Martina Navratilova (1986–87)
    • Four consecutive major titles from 1986 Wimbledon through the 1987 French Open.
  • Gigi Fernández and Natasha Zvereva (1992–93)
    • Six consecutive major titles from the 1992 French Open through 1993 Wimbledon.
  • Natasha Zvereva (1996–97)
    • Four consecutive major titles from the 1996 US Open through 1997 Wimbledon (all with Gigi Fernández with the exception of 1997 Australian Open won with Martina Hingis).
  • Serena Williams and Venus Williams (2009–2010)
    • Four consecutive titles from 2009 Wimbledon through the 2010 French Open.

Most consecutive Grand Slam tournament titles

Men's singles

Don Budge (6): (1937 Wimbledon through the 1938 U.S. Championships).

Women's singles

Men's doubles

Team:

Player:

  • 8: Frank Sedgman (from the 1950 U.S. Championships through the 1952 Wimbledon Championships)

Women's doubles

Team:

  • 8: Martina Navratilova and Pam Shriver (1983 Wimbledon Championships/US Open/Australian Open, 1984 French Open/Wimbledon Championships/US Open/Australian Open, 1985 French Open)
  • 6: Gigi Fernández and Natasha Zvereva (1992 French Open/Wimbledon Championships/US Open, 1993 Australian Open/French Open/Wimbledon Championships)

Player:

  • 8: Martina Navratilova (1983 Wimbledon Championships/US Open/Australian Open, 1984 French Open/Wimbledon Championships/US Open/Australian Open, 1985 French Open)
  • 8: Pam Shriver (1983 Wimbledon Championships/US Open/Australian Open, 1984 French Open/Wimbledon Championships/US Open/Australian Open, 1985 French Open)

Most consecutive Major singles finals

Men

Rank Player # Notes
1 Roger Federer 10 2005 Wimbledon – 2007 US Open
2 Roger Federer 8 2008 French Open – 2010 Australian Open
3 Jack Crawford 7 1934 Australian Championships – 1935 Wimbledon
4 Don Budge 6 1937 Wimbledon1938 U.S. Championships
= Rod Laver 6 1961 Wimbledon1962 U.S. Championships
6 Fred Perry 5 1934 Wimbledon1935 Wimbledon
= Frank Sedgman 5 1951 U.S. Championships1952 U.S. Championships
= Fred Stolle 5 1964 Wimbledon1965 Wimbledon
9 Lew Hoad 4 1956 Australian Championships – 1956 U.S. Championships
= Rod Laver 4 1969 Australian Open – 1969 US Open
= Andre Agassi 4 1999 French Open2000 Australian Open

Women

Rank Player # Notes
1 Steffi Graf 13 1987 French Open1990 French Open
2 Martina Navratilova 11 1985 French Open – 1987 US Open
3 Martina Navratilova 6 1983 Wimbledon Championships – 1984 US Open
= Chris Evert 6 1984 French Open1985 Wimbledon Championships
= Monica Seles 6 1991 US Open – 1993 Australian Open
= Margaret Court 6 1969 US Open – 1971 Australian Open
= Maureen Connolly Brinker 6 1952 Wimbledon Championships1953 US Championships
8 Steffi Graf 5 1993 Australian Open1994 Australian Open
= Martina Hingis 5 1997 Australian Open1998 Australian Open
= Margaret Court 5 1963 Wimbledon Championships1964 Wimbledon Championships
= Margaret Court 5 1965 Australian Championships – 1966 Australian Championships
12 Molla Bjurstedt Mallory 4 1915 U.S. Championships1918 U.S. Championships
= Pauline Betz Addie 4 1941 U.S. Championships1944 U.S. Championships
= Maria Bueno 4 1964 French Championships – 1965 Australian Championships
= Hana Mandlíková 4 1980 US Open – 1981 Wimbledon Championships
= Martina Navratilova 4 1981 US Open – 1982 Wimbledon Championships
= Chris Evert 4 1982 Wimbledon Championships1983 French Open
= Arantxa Sánchez Vicario 4 1994 US Open – 1995 Wimbledon
= Serena Williams 4 2002 French Open2003 Australian Open
= Venus Williams 4 2002 French Open2003 Australian Open
= Justine Henin 4 2006 Australian Open – 2006 US Open

Most Grand Slam singles titles in a row (non-consecutive)

Helen Wills Moody won all 16 of the Grand Slam singles tournaments she played beginning with the 1924 U.S. Championships and extending through the 1933 Wimbledon Championships (not counting her defaults in the 1926 French and Wimbledon Championships). The first 15 of those were won without losing a set. During this period, she won 6 Wimbledons, 4 French Championships, and 6 U.S. Championships. She also won the 1924 Summer Olympics during this period. Moody never entered the Australian Championships.

Most Grand Slam mixed doubles titles in a row (non-consecutive)

Doris Hart won all 13 of the Grand Slam mixed doubles tournaments she played beginning with the 1951 French Championships and extending through the 1955 U.S. Championships. During this period, she won 5 Wimbledons, 3 French Championships, and 5 U.S. Championships.

Career Grand Slam

Winning all four Grand Slam tournaments during a career is termed a Career Grand Slam. Seven men and nine women have accomplished this in singles play, including four men (Rod Laver, Andre Agassi, Roger Federer and Rafael Nadal) and five women (Margaret Court, Chris Evert, Martina Navratilova, Steffi Graf, and Serena Williams) since the beginning of the open era.

A number of high-achievement players have failed to achieve the Career Grand Slam. Björn Borg never won the US Open or the Australian Open. John McEnroe never won the Australian Open or the French Open. Ken Rosewall, Guillermo Vilas, Ivan Lendl, Monica Seles, Mats Wilander, and Justine Henin failed to win Wimbledon. Pete Sampras, John Newcombe, Arthur Ashe, Jimmy Connors, Boris Becker, Stefan Edberg, Martina Hingis, and Lindsay Davenport failed to win the French Open. Evonne Goolagong Cawley never won the US Open, and Helen Wills Moody and Althea Gibson never won the Australian Open.

Venus Williams thus far has failed to win either the Australian Open or the French Open, and Maria Sharapova has not yet won the French Open.

The following lists the players who have won all four Grand Slam singles tournaments. The year in which they won their first Grand Slam singles tournament is listed first. The tournaments (or years) needed to complete their first Career Grand Slam were won are then listed. The ages of the players when their Career Grand Slam was completed are shown in square brackets.

Men's singles

  • Fred Perry (1933 U.S. Championships, 1934 Australian Championships, 1934 Wimbledon Championships & 1935 French Championships) [26]
  • Don Budge (1937 Wimbledon Championships, 1937 U.S. Championships, 1938 Australian Championships & 1938 French Championships) [23]
  • Rod Laver (1960 Australian Championships, 1961 Wimbledon Championships, 1962 French Championships & 1962 U.S. Championships) [24]
  • Roy Emerson (1961 Australian Championships, 1961 U.S. Championships, 1963 French Championships & 1964 Wimbledon Championships) [27]
  • Andre Agassi (1992 Wimbledon, 1994 US Open, 1995 Australian Open & 1999 French Open) [29]
    • Agassi also accomplished a Career Golden Slam by winning the singles Olympic gold medal at the Atlanta 1996 Olympic Games to go with his career Grand Slam.
  • Roger Federer (2003 Wimbledon, 2004 Australian Open, 2004 US Open & 2009 French Open) [27]
  • Rafael Nadal (2005 French Open, 2008 Wimbledon, 2009 Australian Open & 2010 US Open) [24]
    • Nadal also accomplished a Career Golden Slam by winning the singles Olympic gold medal at the Beijing 2008 Olympic Games to go with his career Grand Slam.

Women's singles

  • Maureen Connolly Brinker (1951 U.S. Championships, 1952 Wimbledon Championships, 1953 Australian Championships & 1953 French Championships; all as Maureen Connolly) [18]
  • Doris Hart (1949 Australian Championships, 1950 French Championships, 1951 Wimbledon Championships & 1954 U.S. Championships) [29]
  • Shirley Fry Irvin (1951 French Championships, 1956 Wimbledon Championships, 1956 U.S. Championships & 1957 Australian Championships) [29]
  • Margaret Court (1960 Australian Championships, 1962 French Championships, 1962 U.S. Championships & 1963 Wimbledon Championships; as Margaret Smith) [20]
  • Billie Jean King (1966 Wimbledon Championships, 1967 U.S. Championships, 1968 Australian Championships & 1972 French Open) [28]
  • Chris Evert (1974 French Open, 1974 Wimbledon Championships, 1975 US Open & 1982 Australian Open) [28]
  • Martina Navratilova (1978 Wimbledon Championships, 1981 Australian Open, 1982 French Open & 1983 US Open) [26]
  • Steffi Graf (1987 French Open, 1988 Australian Open, 1988 Wimbledon & 1988 US Open) [19]
    • Graf also accomplished a Career Golden Slam by winning the singles Olympic gold medal at the Seoul 1988 Olympic Games to go with her career Grand Slam.
  • Serena Williams (1999 US Open, 2002 French Open, 2002 Wimbledon & 2003 Australian Open) [21]

Men's doubles

The teams and individual players who won all four Grand Slam doubles tournaments during their careers are listed. The year in which they won their first Grand Slam doubles tournament is listed first. The years in which the tournaments needed to complete the Career Grand Slam were won are then listed.

Male doubles players who won a Career Grand Slam (7):

Women's doubles

Female doubles players who won a Career Grand Slam (13):

Mixed doubles

In the following, the players who won all four Grand Slam mixed doubles tournaments during their careers are listed. (The year in which they won their first Grand Slam mixed doubles tournament is listed first. The years in which the tournaments needed to complete the Career Grand Slam were won are then listed.)

Male doubles players who won a Career Grand Slam:

Female doubles players who won a Career Grand Slam:

Boys singles

Boys doubles

Golden Slam

The term Golden Slam (initially "Golden Grand Slam") was coined in 1988 when Steffi Graf won all four Grand Slam singles tournaments and the singles gold medal in tennis at the Summer Olympics in the same calendar year. To date, she is the only player to have achieved a calendar year Golden Slam.[13]

Tennis was an Olympic sport from the inaugural 1896 Summer Olympics through the 1924 Games, then was dropped for the next 64 years (except as a demonstration sport in 1968 and 1984) before returning in 1988. As there were only three Major championships designated by the International Lawn Tennis Federation before 1925, no tennis players who retired before 1988 had the chance to complete a single season Golden Slam. There was a small window for the gold medal winners from the 1920 Olympics or 1924 Olympics, if they chose to travel, to complete a career golden slam.

Career Golden Slam

A player who wins all four Grand Slam tournaments and the Olympic gold medal during his or her career is said to have achieved a Career Golden Slam.

  • Singles players who won a Career Golden Slam (a singles Career Grand Slam plus the Olympic gold medal in singles):
    • Steffi Graf (1987 French Open, 1988 Australian Open, 1988 Wimbledon Championships, 1988 Olympic gold medal, & 1988 US Open) (as mentioned above, added a Calendar Year Golden Slam by winning her second consecutive French Open in 1988)
    • Andre Agassi (1992 Wimbledon, 1994 US Open, 1995 Australian Open, 1996 Olympic gold medal, & 1999 French Open)
    • Rafael Nadal (2005 French Open, 2008 Wimbledon, 2008 Olympic gold medal, 2009 Australian Open, & 2010 US Open)
  • Doubles teams that won a Career Golden Slam (a doubles team Career Grand Slam & the Olympic gold medal in doubles):
  • Career Golden Championship Slam:

The career golden championship slam is when a player wins all four grand slams, the olympic gold medal, and a year end championship.[citation needed] Only two players have ever done this. Steffi Graf and Andre Agassi.

Three Major tournament titles in a year

Players who have won three of the four Grand Slam tournaments in the same year.

Men's singles

  • Jack Crawford
    • 1933: Australian, French, & Wimbledon Championships
  • Fred Perry
    • 1934: Australian, Wimbledon, & U.S. Championships
  • Tony Trabert
    • 1955: French, Wimbledon, & U.S. Championships
  • Lew Hoad
    • 1956: Australian, French, & Wimbledon Championships
  • Ashley Cooper
    • 1958: Australian, Wimbledon, & U.S. Championships
  • Roy Emerson
    • 1964: Australian, Wimbledon, & U.S. Championships
  • Jimmy Connors
    • 1974: Australian, Wimbledon, & US Open (He and others were banned from the 1974 French Open[14])
  • Mats Wilander
    • 1988: Australian, French, & US Open
  • Roger Federer
    • 2004: Australian, Wimbledon, & US Open
    • 2006: Australian, Wimbledon, & US Open
    • 2007: Australian, Wimbledon, & US Open
  • Rafael Nadal
    • 2010: French Open, Wimbledon, & US Open
  • Novak Djokovic
    • 2011: Australian, Wimbledon, & US Open

Women's singles

  • Helen Wills
    • 1928: French Championships, Wimbledon, & U.S. Championships
    • 1929: French Championships, Wimbledon, & U.S. Championships
  • Margaret Courtalso winner of a Calendar Year Grand Slam in 1970
    • 1962: Australian, French, & U.S. Championships
    • 1965: Australian, Wimbledon, & U.S. Championships
    • 1969: Australian, French, & US Open
    • 1973: Australian, French, & US Open
  • Billie Jean King
    • 1972: French Open, Wimbledon, & US Open
  • Martina Navratilovawon six consecutive Grand Slam titles in 1983–84
    • 1983: Wimbledon, US Open, & Australian Open
    • 1984: French Open, Wimbledon, & US Open
  • Steffi Grafalso winner of a Grand Slam in 1988, a Golden Slam in 1988, and a Non-Calendar Year Grand Slam (ending with the 1994 Australian Open)
    • 1989: Australian Open, Wimbledon, & US Open
    • 1993: French Open, Wimbledon, & US Open
    • 1995: French Open, Wimbledon, & US Open
    • 1996: French Open, Wimbledon, & US Open
  • Monica Seles
    • 1991: Australian Open, French Open, & US Open
    • 1992: Australian Open, French Open, & US Open
  • Martina Hingis
    • 1997: Australian Open, Wimbledon, & US Open
  • Serena Williamswinner of a Non-Calendar Year Grand Slam after winning the 2003 Australian Open
    • 2002: French Open, Wimbledon, & US Open

Men's doubles

  • Jacques Brugnon
    • 1928: Australian Championships, French Championships, Wimbledon
  • John Van Ryn
    • 1931: French Championships, Wimbledon, U.S. Championships
  • Jack Crawford
    • 1935: Australian Championships, French Championships, Wimbledon
  • John Bromwich
    • 1950: Australian Championships, Wimbledon, U.S. Championships
  • Ken McGregor
    • 1952: Australian Championships, French Championships, Wimbledon
  • Frank Sedgman
    • 1952: Australian Championships, French Championships, Wimbledon
  • Ken Rosewall
    • 1953: Australian Championships, French Championships, Wimbledon
    • 1956: Australian Championships, Wimbledon, U.S. Championships
  • Lew Hoad
    • 1953: Australian Championships, French Championships, Wimbledon
    • 1956: Australian Championships, Wimbledon, U.S. Championships
  • Tony Roche
    • 1967: Australian Championships, French Championships, U.S. Championships
  • John Newcombe
    • 1967: Australian Championships, French Championships, U.S. Championships
    • 1973: Australian Open, French Open, US Open
  • Anders Järryd
    • 1987: Australian Open, French Open, US Open
    • 1991: French Open, Wimbledon, US Open
  • John Fitzgerald
    • 1991: French Open, Wimbledon, US Open
  • Jacco Eltingh
    • 1998: Australian Open, French Open, Wimbledon

Women's doubles

  • Margaret Osborne duPont
    • 1946: French Championships, Wimbledon, U.S. Championships
    • 1949: French Championships, Wimbledon, U.S. Championships
  • Louise Brough Clapp
    • 1946: French Championships, Wimbledon, U.S. Championships
    • 1949: French Championships, Wimbledon, U.S. Championships
    • 1950: Australian Championships, Wimbledon, U.S. Championships
  • Doris Hart
    • 1951: French Championships, Wimbledon, U.S. Championships
    • 1952: French Championships, Wimbledon, U.S. Championships
    • 1953: French Championships, Wimbledon, U.S. Championships
  • Shirley Fry Irvin
    • 1951: French Championships, Wimbledon, U.S. Championships
    • 1952: French Championships, Wimbledon, U.S. Championships
    • 1953: French Championships, Wimbledon, U.S. Championships
  • Althea Gibson
    • 1957: Australian Championships, Wimbledon, U.S. Championships
  • Darlene Hard
    • 1962: French Championships, Wimbledon, U.S. Championships
  • Lesley Turner Bowrey
    • 1964: Australian Championships, French Championships, Wimbledon
  • Nancy Richey Gunter
    • 1966: Australian Championships, Wimbledon, U.S. Championships
  • Betty Stöve
    • 1972: French Open, Wimbledon, US Open
  • Margaret Court
    • 1973: Australian Open, French Open, US Open
  • Virginia Wade
    • 1973: Australian Open, French Open, US Open
  • Helen Gourlay Cawley
    • 1977: Australian Open (January), Wimbledon, Australian Open (December)
  • Martina Navratilova
    • 1982: French Open, Wimbledon, Australian Open
    • 1983: Wimbledon, US Open, Australian Open
    • 1986: French Open, Wimbledon, US Open
    • 1987: Australian Open, French Open, US Open
  • Pam Shriver
    • 1983: Wimbledon, US Open, Australian Open
    • 1987: Australian Open, French Open, US Open
  • Helena Suková
    • 1990: Australian Open, French Open, Wimbledon
  • Gigi Fernández
    • 1992: French Open, Wimbledon, US Open
    • 1993: Australian Open, French Open, Wimbledon
    • 1994: Australian Open, French Open, Wimbledon
  • Natasha Zvereva
    • 1992: French Open, Wimbledon, US Open
    • 1993: Australian Open, French Open, Wimbledon
    • 1994: Australian Open, French Open, Wimbledon
    • 1997: Australian Open, French Open, Wimbledon
  • Jana Novotná
    • 1990: Australian Open, French Open, Wimbledon
    • 1998: French Open, Wimbledon, US Open
  • Virginia Ruano Pascual
    • 2004: Australian Open, French Open, US Open
  • Paola Suárez
    • 2004: Australian Open, French Open, US Open
  • Serena Williams
    • 2009: Australian Open, Wimbledon, US Open
  • Venus Williams
    • 2009: Australian Open, Wimbledon, US Open

Mixed doubles

  • Eric Sturgess
    • 1949: French Championships, Wimbledon, U.S. Championships
  • Frank Sedgman
    • 1951: French Championships, Wimbledon, U.S. Championships
    • 1952: French Championships, Wimbledon, U.S. Championships
  • Doris Hart
    • 1951: French Championships, Wimbledon, U.S. Championships
    • 1952: French Championships, Wimbledon, U.S. Championships
    • 1953: French Championships, Wimbledon, U.S. Championships
  • Vic Seixas
    • 1953: French Championships, Wimbledon, U.S. Championships
  • Margaret Court
    • 1964: Australian Championships, French Championships, U.S. Championships
    • 1969: Australian Open, French Open, US Open
  • Billie Jean King
    • 1967: French Championships, Wimbledon, U.S. Championships
  • Marty Riessen
    • 1969: Australian Open, French Open, US Open
  • Bob Hewitt
    • 1979: French Open, Wimbledon, US Open
  • Martina Navratilova
    • 1985: French Open, Wimbledon, US Open
  • Mark Woodforde
    • 1992: Australian Open, Wimbledon, US Open

Boys' singles

Girls' singles

  • Natalia Zvereva
    • 1987: French Open, Wimbledon, US Open
  • Magdalena Maleeva
    • 1990: Australian Open, French Open, US Open

Boys' doubles

Girls' doubles

Career "Boxed Set"

Another Grand Slam-related accomplishment is winning a "boxed set" of Grand Slam titles – winning the singles, doubles, and mixed doubles at all four Grand Slam events.

The top men's singles players have played comparatively few doubles, and very few mixed doubles. Three women have completed the "boxed set" during their careers:

Serena Williams has come closer than any other currently active player to joining this elite group. She has yet to win the mixed doubles at the Australian and French opens (finishing as the runner-up at the 1999 Australian Open and 1998 French Open)

Multiple Slam Sets

Of the many players who have managed to win a full set of four Majors, there is a small number who have gone on to win all four Majors a second – or even multiple – times. The completion of “multiple slam sets” (MSS) has been achieved by only 17 unique players up to the end of the 2010 season. MSS players can be found in each of the 5 tennis disciplines: men's or women's singles, men's or women's doubles, and mixed doubles. Of these, 4 players have completed MSS in more than one discipline: Roy Emerson, Martina Navratilova and Frank Sedgman have MSS in 2 disciplines, Margaret Court has MSS in 3 disciplines.

This table shows each multiple occurrence of a complete MSS for each of the players who have accomplished multiple slams in a particular tennis discipline. The year shown for each of the 4 Majors is the year that particular Major win was repeated as part of that player’s achievement of their second (all 17 players) and third (7 players) and fourth (4 players) and fifth through seventh (Martina Navratilova, in women’s doubles) complete slam set of Major wins.

Nationality Player MSS # Australia Australian Open France French Open United Kingdom Wimbledon United States US Open Discipline
 Australia Frank Sedgman 2 1952 1952 1951 1951 MD
 United States Doris Hart 2 1950 1952 1952 1952 XD
 Australia Frank Sedgman 2 1950 1952 1952 1952 XD
 Australia Neale Fraser 2 1958 1960 1961 1960 MD
 Australia Margaret Court 2 1964 1964 1965 1962 XD
 Australia Margaret Court 2 1961 1964 1965 1965 WS
 Australia Margaret Court 3 1965 1965 1966 1963 XD
 Australia Roy Emerson 2 1963 1967 1965 1964 MS
 Australia Roy Emerson 2 1966 1961 1961 1960 MD
 Australia Margaret Court 4 1969 1969 1968 1964 XD
 Australia Margaret Court 2 1962 1965 1969 1968 WD
 Australia Rod Laver 2 1962 1969 1962 1969 MS
 Australia Margaret Court 3 1962 1969 1970 1969 WS
 Australia Ken Rosewall 2 1956 1968 1956 1969 MD
 Australia Roy Emerson 3 1969 1962 1971 1965 MD
 Australia John Newcombe 2 1967 1969 1966 1971 MD
 Australia John Newcombe 3 1971 1973 1968 1973 MD
 United States Martina Navratilova 2 1982 1982 1979 1978 WD
 United States Martina Navratilova 2 1983 1984 1979 1984 WS
 United States Martina Navratilova 3 1983 1984 1981 1980 WD
 United States Chris Evert 2 1984 1975 1976 1976 WS
 United States Martina Navratilova 4 1984 1985 1982 1983 WD
 United States Pam Shriver 2 1983 1985 1982 1984 WD
 United States Martina Navratilova 5 1985 1986 1983 1984 WD
 United States Martina Navratilova 6 1987 1987 1984 1986 WD
 United States Pam Shriver 3 1984 1987 1983 1986 WD
 United States Martina Navratilova 7 1988 1988 1986 1987 WD
 United States Pam Shriver 4 1985 1988 1984 1987 WD
 West Germany Steffi Graf 2 1989 1988 1989 1989 WS
 Germany Steffi Graf 3 1990 1993 1991 1993 WS
 United States Gigi Fernández 2 1994 1992 1993 1990 WD
 Belarus Natasha Zvereva 2 1994 1992 1992 1992 WD
 Germany Steffi Graf 4 1994 1995 1992 1995 WS
 Belarus Natasha Zvereva 3 1997 1993 1993 1995 WD
 Czech Republic Jana Novotná 2 1995 1991 1990 1997 WD
 United States Serena Williams 2 2003 2010 2002 2009 WD
 United States Venus Williams 2 2003 2010 2002 2009 WD
  • MS – Men's Singles
  • WS – Women's Singles
  • MD – Men's Doubles
  • WD – Women's Doubles
  • XD – Mixed Doubles

See also

References

External links


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