Chancellor of the High Court


Chancellor of the High Court
Scale of justice 2 new.jpeg Law of England and Wales portal

The Chancellor of the High Court is the head of the Chancery Division of the High Court of Justice of England and Wales. Before October 2005, when certain provisions of the Constitutional Reform Act 2005 took effect, the office was known as the Vice-Chancellor. He nominally acted as the Lord Chancellor's deputy in the English and Welsh legal system; however, he was in effect the head of the Chancery Division. Despite the change of title, the duties of the office did not change.

Contents

History of the office

The judges of the Court of Chancery (apart from the Lord Chancellor and the Master of the Rolls), before the creation of the High Court of Justice of England and Wales in 1873-75, held the title of Vice-Chancellor. The first of them was appointed in 1813 and two more such posts were added in 1842. After the Judicature Acts of the 1870s Vice-Chancellors were not appointed, and judges of the Chancery Division were styled "Mr. Justice ..." like other judges of the High Court (this style had previously been used for judges of the common law courts).

A similar position was held by Hedges Eyre Chatterton as Vice-Chancellor of Ireland from 1867 to 1904 in the High Court of Justice (Ireland) Chancery Division, as deputy to the Lord Chancellor of Ireland.

In 1971 the office of Vice-Chancellor was recreated, to be the Vice President of the Chancery Division of the High Court.

Sir Robert Andrew Morritt became the Vice-Chancellor in July 2000 and is the first Chancellor of the High Court.

Ireland

A similar position existed in Ireland

Vice-Chancellors of England, 1813-1850

Vice-Chancellors, 1841-1886

  • 1841-1851: Sir James Lewis Knight-Bruce
  • 1841-1850: James Wigram
  • 1850-1851: The Lord Cranworth
  • 1851-1853: Sir George James Turner
  • 1851-1866: Sir Richard Torin Kindersley
  • 1851-1852: Sir James Parker
  • 1852-1871: Sir John Stuart
  • 1853-1868: Sir William Page Wood
  • 1866-1881: Sir Richard Malins
  • 1868-1869: Sir George Markham Giffard
  • 1869-1870: Sir William Milbourne James
  • 1870-1886: Sir James Bacon
  • 1871-1873: Sir John Wickens
  • 1873-1882: Sir Charles Hall

Vice-Chancellors, 1971-2005

  • 1971: Sir John Pennycuick (1899-1982)
  • 1974: Sir (John) Anthony Plowman[1] (1905-1993)
  • 1976: Sir Robert Edgar Megarry (1910-2006)
  • 1985: Sir Nicholas Browne-Wilkinson (b. 1936)
  • 1991: Sir Donald Nicholls (b. 1933)
  • 1994: Sir Richard Scott (b. 1934)
  • 2000: Sir Andrew Morritt (b. 1938)

Chancellor of the High Court, 2005-present

References

  1. ^ Who's Who 1986
  • A History of English Law, Vol. I, by Sir William Holdsworth (Methuen & Co, 1961 reprint)
  • Twentieth-Century British Political Facts 1900-2000, by David Butler and Gareth Butler (Macmillan Press 2000)
  • Joseph Haydn, The Book of Dignities, 1894

External links


Wikimedia Foundation. 2010.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Chancellor of the Exchequer — Arms of Her Majesty s Government Her Majesty s Treasury …   Wikipedia

  • High Court of Justice — For other uses, see High Court of Justice (disambiguation). High Court of Justice Royal Courts of Justice, The Strand Established 1875 …   Wikipedia

  • High Court of Justice — (also the High Court) the branch of the legal system in England and Wales that deals mainly with serious civil cases (= ones concerned with the private rights of citizens rather than with crimes). It is divided into the Queen’s Bench, the… …   Universalium

  • High Court enforcement officer — High Court Enforcement Officers are authorised by the Lord Chancellor to execute High Court writs. They can seize and sell goods to cover the amount of a debt owed.http://www.hmcourts service.gov.uk/courtfinder/forms/ex345.pdf] They can also… …   Wikipedia

  • High Court (Ireland) — Not to be confused with Courts of Northern Ireland#High Court. Ireland This article is part of the series: Politics and government of the Republic of Ireland …   Wikipedia

  • High Court judge — A High Court judge is a judge of the High Court of Justice, and represents the third highest level of judge in the courts of England and Wales. High Court judges are referred to as puisne (pronounced puny ) judges.Title and form of addressUpon… …   Wikipedia

  • Chancellor of the exchequer — Exchequer Ex*cheq uer, n. [OE. escheker, OF. eichekier, fr. LL. scaccarium. See {Checker}, {Chess}, {Check}.] 1. One of the superior courts of law; so called from a checkered cloth, which covers, or formerly covered, the table. [Eng.] [1913… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • High Court of Admiralty — In England, formerly the court presided over by the deputy of the admiral of the fleet. It was established с 1360 to deal with matters of discipline and cases of piracy and prizes (ships and goods captured at sea), but it eventually had… …   Universalium

  • Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster — Chancellor Chan cel*lor, n. [OE. canceler, chaunceler, F. chancelier, LL. cancellarius chancellor, a director of chancery, fr. L. cancelli lattices, crossbars, which surrounded the seat of judgment. See {Chancel}.] A judicial court of chancery,… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Chancellor of the exchequer — Chancellor Chan cel*lor, n. [OE. canceler, chaunceler, F. chancelier, LL. cancellarius chancellor, a director of chancery, fr. L. cancelli lattices, crossbars, which surrounded the seat of judgment. See {Chancel}.] A judicial court of chancery,… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English


Share the article and excerpts

Direct link
Do a right-click on the link above
and select “Copy Link”

We are using cookies for the best presentation of our site. Continuing to use this site, you agree with this.