David Miller (philosopher)


David Miller (philosopher)

David W. Miller (born 19 August 1942) is a philosopher and prominent exponent of critical rationalism.[1] He taught in the Department of Philosophy at the University of Warwick in Coventry, UK.[2]

In 1964 he went to the London School of Economics as a student to study Logic and Scientific Method. Soon afterwards he became one of Karl Popper's research assistants.[3][4] In a series of papers in the 1970s, Miller and others uncovered defects in Popper's formal definition of verisimilitude, previously a mostly ignored aspect of Popper's theory. A substantial literature developed in the two decades following, including papers by Miller, to assess the remediability of Popper's approach.

Miller's Critical Rationalism [1] is an attempt to expound, defend, and extend an approach to scientific knowledge identified with Popper. A central, "not quite original", thesis is that rationality does not depend on good reasons. Rather, it is better off without them, especially as they are unobtainable and unusable.[5]


See also

References

  1. ^ a b Miller, David Donald (1994). Critical rationalism: a restatement and defence. La Salle, Ill: Open Court. ISBN 0-8126-9198-9. 
  2. ^ "University of Warwick | Philosophy | Associates | David Miller". http://www2.warwick.ac.uk/fac/soc/philosophy/people/associates/miller. Retrieved 2011-09-07. 
  3. ^ Miller, D. (1997). "Sir Karl Raimund Popper, C. H., F. B. A. 28 July 1902--17 September 1994.: Elected F.R.S. 1976". Biographical Memoirs of Fellows of the Royal Society 43: 369. doi:10.1098/rsbm.1997.0021.  edit
  4. ^ Miller, David Donald (2006). Out of error: further essays on critical rationalism. Aldershot, Hants, England: Ashgate. ISBN 0-7546-5068-5. 
  5. ^ Miller, D. (1999). "Being an Absolute Skeptic". Science 284 (5420): 1625. doi:10.1126/science.284.5420.1625.  edit

External links



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