Georgia Bulldogs football


Georgia Bulldogs football

NCAAFootballSchool
TeamName = Georgia Bulldogs football
CurrentSeason = 2008 Georgia Bulldogs football team


ImageSize = 125px
HeadCoachDisplay = Mark Richt
HeadCoachLink = Mark Richt
HeadCoachYear = 8th
HCWins = 76
HCLosses = 20
HCTies = 0
OtherStaff = Mike Bobo (OC)
Willie Martinez (DC)
Stadium = Sanford Stadium
StadiumBuilt = 1929
StadCapacity = 92,746
StadSurface = Grass
Location = Athens, Georgia
ConferenceDisplay= SEC
ConferenceLink = Southeastern Conference
ConfDivision = Eastern
PastAffiliations = SIAA (1895-1921) Southern Conference (1921-1932)
FirstYear = 1892
AthlDirectorDisp = Damon Evans
AthlDirectorLink = Damon Evans
WebsiteName = georgiadogs.com - Football
WebsiteURL = http://www.georgiadogs.com/SportSelect.dbml?DB_OEM_ID=8800&KEY=&SPID=3571&SPSID=40673
ATWins = 717
ATLosses = 382
ATTies = 34
ATPercentage = .648
BowlWins = 24
BowlLosses = 16
BowlTies = 3
NatlTitles = 2
ConfTitles = 12
DivTitles = 5
Heismans = 2
AllAmericans = 66
Color1 = Red
Color1Hex = D60022
Color2 = Black
Color2Hex = 000000
FightSong = Glory, Glory
MascotDisplay = Uga
MascotLink = Uga (mascot)
MarchingBand = Georgia Redcoat Marching Band
PagFreeLabel =
PagFreeValue =

The Georgia Bulldogs football team represents the University of Georgia in football. The Bulldogs are a member of the Southeastern Conference (SEC) and are frequently a top-25 team. [cite web | url= http://homepages.cae.wisc.edu/~dwilson/rsfc/history/APpolls.txt | title= Final AP polls from 1936 to 2005 | accessdate=2007-01-03| format=HTML |publisher= Patrick L Dunn |language=English 17 times from 1980 to 2005] The University of Georgia has had a football team since 1892 and has an all-time record of 717–382–34 (a .648 winning percentage). The "Dawgs," as they are sometimes called, play in historic Sanford Stadium in Athens, Georgia, which, with a capacity of 92,746, is the fifth largest on-campus stadium in the United States. [cite web | url= http://www.ncaa.org/library/records/football/football_records_book/2006/2006_d1_football_records_book.pdf | title= Official 2006 NCAA Divisions I-A and II-A Football Records Book | accessdate=2006-12-21 | format=HTML |publisher= ncaa.org |pages=p. 118 |language=English ] The Bulldogs have won three consensus NCAA Division 1-A college football National Championships and 12 Southeastern Conference championships. The team has also produced two Heisman Award winners, as well as winners of a number of other awards and numerous All-Americans and NFL players.

History

Early years: 1892–1909

The University of Georgia first formed a football squad in 1892, with chemistry professor Charles Herty as head coach. The team played its first game against a team from Mercer University, in what was supposedly the first football game played in the deep south. [http://www.georgiadogs.com/attachments1/1566.pdf?SPSID=46724&SPID=3571&DB_OEM_ID=8800 Georgia Football Through the Years] ] Playing on a field that would later be called Herty Field, Georgia beat Mercer by a score of 50-0. In the second (and final) game of that inaugural "season," Georgia lost by a score of 10–0 to Auburn University. That game marked the beginning of Georgia’s longest-standing football rivalry, which is called the Deep South's Oldest Rivalry.

From 1892 until 1909, the head coach at Georgia changed frequently, with 14 different head coaches in a 17 year period. The combined record was 47–52–10 (.477 winning percentage). During this time period, Georgia’s greatest success came when Glenn “Pop” Warner coached it "and" Iowa State for two seasons. [ [http://www.news.cornell.edu/Chronicle/97/9.18.97/Pop_Warner.html Pop Warner in the Cornell Chronicle] ] In 1896, Warner-led Georgia went 4–0 on the way to its first conference championship, when the team was a co-champion of the Southern Intercollegiate Athletic Association (SIAA). It is thought that the first forward pass in football occurred in 1895 (passing was illegal at that time) in a game between Georgia and North Carolina when, out of desperation, the ball was thrown by the North Carolina quarterback instead of punted and a North Carolina player caught the ball. [ [http://www.tarheeltimes.com/2006/08/tar_heels_credi.html Tar Heels Credited with Throwing First Forward Pass] ]

In 1897, football very nearly came to an end in the state when a Georgia fullback named Richard Vonalbade ("Von") Gammon died as a result of injuries sustained in a game. The Georgia state legislature quickly passed a bill banning football from the state, but the bill was vetoed by Georgia Governor William Yates Atkinson, based upon an appeal from Gammon's mother, Rosalind Gammon. [ [http://www.cviog.uga.edu/Projects/gainfo/tdgh-oct/oct30.htm "This Day in Georgia History: October 30"] , Ed Jackson and Charly Pou, Carl Vinson Institute of Government, The University of Georgia]

Mehre-Butts era: 1910–1963

Beginning in 1910, Georgia started experiencing stability in its head coaches. In 1911, Georgia moved its playing field from Herty Field to Sanford Field, where wooden stands were built. [ [http://www.cviog.uga.edu/Projects/gainfo/gahistmarkers/UGAathletichistmarker.htm UGA Historic Athletic Grounds Historical Marker] ] In the 53 years following 1910, Georgia had 7 head coaches and a record of 307–180–33 (a .622 winning percentage). Although Harry Mehre and Wally Butts are the two best-known coaches from this era, it was George “Kid” Woodruff who led the Bulldogs to their first claim to national championship. In 1927, Georgia finished the season 9–1 and could stake a claim to the national championship by finishing number 1 in at least one national poll. [http://www.georgiadogs.com/ViewArticle.dbml?SPSID=46724&SPID=3571&DB_OEM_ID=8800&ATCLID=526158 Georgia Football National Championships] ] Herman Stegeman coached the Bulldogs to an 8–0 record in 1920, when the team was named co-champion of the SIAA.

Harry Mehre coached the Bulldogs for nine years from 1928 to 1937, but perhaps his most memorable game was in 1929. October 12, 1929 was the inaugural game in the newly completed Sanford Stadium and Mehre’s Bulldogs responded with an upset victory over the powerhouse of the day, Yale University, winning 15-0. [http://www.georgiadogs.com/ViewArticle.dbml?SPSID=46724&SPID=3571&DB_OEM_ID=8800&ATCLID=523288 Former Head Coaches] ] In that game, Vernon “Catfish” Smith scored all 15 points for Georgia. As head coach, Mehre compiled a 59–34–6 record (.626 winning percentage), but was never able to win a conference championship.

Wally Butts coached the Bulldogs for 21 seasons (1939–1960) and continued as athletic director until 1963. Butts came to UGA as an assistant to Joel Hunt in 1938, but Hunt left UGA after a 5-4-1 season to take over at Wyoming; Butts succeeded to the post of head coach. During his tenure as head coach, Georgia won its first consensus NCAA Division 1-A college football national championship in 1942 and had a claim to the national championship in 1946 after finishing first in at least one national poll. Butts coached 1942 Heisman Trophy winner Frank Sinkwich and Maxwell Award winner Charley Trippi. His teams also won four SEC championships – 1942, 1946, 1948 and 1959. As head coach, Butts posted a 140–86–9 record (.615 winning percentage), including six bowl games. His bowl record was 5–2–1. [ [http://www.ncaa.org/library/records/football/football_records_book/2006/2006_d1_football_records_book.pdf Official 2006 NCAA Divisions I-A and II-A Football Records Book] , page 331] Wally Butts was inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame in 1997. [ [http://www.collegefootball.org/famersearch.php?id=40117 Wally Butts profile in the College Football Hall of Fame] ]

Johnny Griffith, a former player and assistant coach to Wally Butts, succeeded to the position of head coach in 1961. He resigned in December 1963 after going 10–16–2, including a combined 1–8 against Georgia Tech, University of Florida, and Auburn University.

Vince Dooley era: 1964–1988

Vince Dooley held the head coach position longer than any other Bulldogs coach, leading the Bulldogs from 1964 until 1988. During his tenure as head coach, Georgia won its second consensus national championship in 1980, winning the Grantland Rice Award. Dooley’s 1968 team finished first in at least one national poll, giving Georgia a claim to the national championship in that year. [http://www.sicemdawgs.com/football/fb_his.php History on Sic'Em Dawgs.com] ] His teams gave Georgia six SEC Championships and he coached 1982 Heisman Trophy and Maxwell Award winner Herschel Walker, 1968 Outland Trophy winner Bill Stanfill and 40 All-Americans. Dooley won the Paul "Bear" Bryant Award in 1980 and the Amos Alonzo Stagg Award in 2001. He compiled a 201–77–10 record (.715 winning percentage), which included twenty bowl appearances. His bowl record was 8–10–2. [ [http://www.ncaa.org/library/records/football/football_records_book/2006/2006_d1_football_records_book.pdf Official 2006 NCAA Divisions I-A and II-A Football Records Book] , page 332] Vince Dooley was inducted in the College Football Hall of Fame in 1997 [ [http://www.collegefootball.org/famersearch.php?id=80002 Vince Dooley profile in the College Football Hall of Fame] ]

Post-Dooley era: 1989–2000

Ray Goff took over as head coach in 1989 and coached the Bulldogs until 1995, posting a 46–34–1 record (.574 winning percentage). His teams were 0–5 against Tennessee, 1–6 against Florida, 2–4–1 against Auburn, 5–2 against Georgia Tech and won no conference titles. During his time at Georgia, Goff was often derisively referred to as Ray "Goof", a nickname given to him by former Florida and current South Carolina head coach Steve Spurrier. Goff had a 2–2 bowl record. [ [http://www.ncaa.org/library/records/football/football_records_book/2006/2006_d1_football_records_book.pdf Official 2006 NCAA Divisions I-A and II-A Football Records Book] , page 334]

Jim Donnan took over as head coach in 1996 and coached the Bulldogs until 2000, posting a 40-19-0 record (.678 winning percentage). Donnan's teams produced no conference titles and were 1–4 against Tennessee, 2–3 against Auburn, 1–4 against Florida and 2–3 against Georgia Tech. The Bulldogs lost to all four of these rivals in 1999 and only posted a win against Tennessee in 2000. Donnan had a 4-0 bowl record. [ [http://www.ncaa.org/library/records/football/football_records_book/2006/2006_d1_football_records_book.pdf Official 2006 NCAA Divisions I-A and II-A Football Records Book] , page 332]

Mark Richt era: 2001–current

The current head coach of the Georgia Bulldogs is Mark Richt, who joined the Bulldogs in 2001 after serving as the offensive coordinator of the Florida State Seminoles under Bobby Bowden. [ [http://www.georgiadogs.com/ViewArticle.dbml?SPSID=46825&SPID=3571&DB_OEM_ID=8800&ATCLID=307706&Q_SEASON=2006 Mark Richt Biography on georgiadogs.com] ] Since Richt's head coaching tenure began, Georgia has won two SEC championships, 2002 and 2005 and three SEC East Division Championships, 2002, 2003, and 2005. Including bowl games, Richt’s record, as of September 20, 2008, was 76–19–0 (a .800 winning percentage). His bowl record through 2007 was 5–2.

Conference affiliations

Georgia was a founding member of the Southern Intercollegiate Athletic Association (SIAA), the first collegiate athletic conference formed in the United States. Georgia participated in the SIAA from its establishment in 1895 until 1921. Durings its tenure in the SIAA, Georgia was conference co-champion in two years, 1896 and 1920. [ [http://www.cfbdatawarehouse.com/data/conference_champs/champions.php?conid=181 Southern Intercollegiate Athletic Association Conference Champions] ] In 1921, the Bulldogs, along with 12 other teams, left the SIAA and formed the Southern Conference. [ [http://www.nmnathletics.com/attachments1/1533.pdf?DB_OEM_ID=4000 Southern Conference History] , Southern Conference 2006 Media Guide (accessed December 11, 2006)] During its time in the Southern Conference, the team never won a conference championship. In 1932, the Georgia Bulldogs left the Southern Conference to form and join the Southeastern Conference (SEC), where Georgia has won the third most SEC football championships, with 12, behind Alabama (21) and Tennessee (13). [http://www.georgiadogs.com/attachments1/1426.pdf?SPSID=46724&SPID=3571&DB_OEM_ID=8800 All-Time Winningest Division 1-A Teams] ]

Nicknames

It was not until 1920 that the nickname "Bulldog" was used to describe the football team, a name bestowed by sportswriters. On November 3, 1920, Morgan Blake of the Atlanta Journal wrote a story about school nicknames and proposed:

The Georgia Bulldogs would sound good because there is a certain dignity about a bulldog, as well as ferocity. [http://www.georgiadogs.com/ViewArticle.dbml?SPSID=46724&SPID=3571&DB_OEM_ID=8800&ATCLID=526232 Georgia Traditions] ]
Shortly thereafter, another news story appeared in which the name "Bulldogs" was used several times to describe the Georgia team and the nickname has been used ever since. Prior to that time, Georgia was simply known as the "Red and Black." In more recent years, the Bulldogs have been referred to by fans as the "Dawgs"."

Traditions

*Uga (pronounced UH-GUH) is the name of a lineage of white Bulldogs, which have served as the mascot of the University of Georgia since 1956. Uga VI, whose reign began in 1999, passed away from congestive heart failure at his home in Savannah, Georgia on June 27, 2008. Uga VII made his debut on August 30, 2008 in a 45–21 win over the Georgia Southern Eagles. Uga VII's official name is Uga VI's "Loran's Best." Deceased Ugas are interred in a mausoleum near the main entrance to Sanford Stadium.
*"Glory, Glory" is the fight song for the Georgia Bulldogs and was sung at football games as early as the 1890s. The fight song was arranged in its current form in 1915.
*The ringing of the Chapel Bell after a Georgia victory started in the 1890s when the playing field was located near the Chapel and freshmen were compelled to ring the Chapel's bell until midnight to celebrate the victory. Today, freshmen are no longer required to do the chore, with students, alumni, and fans taking their place.
*"How 'Bout Them Dawgs" is a slogan of recent vintage that first surfaced in the late 1970s and has become a battle cry of Bulldog fans. The slogan received national attention and exposure when Georgia won the national championship in 1980 and wire services proclaimed "How 'Bout Them Dogs!" Recently defeated Tennessee 26-14.
*The "Dawg Walk" is a tradition that was revived in the 2001 season that features the football players walking through a gathering of fans on the way to Sanford Stadium. [ [http://www.georgiadogs.com/ViewArticle.dbml?&DB_OEM_ID=8800&ATCLID=498779&SPID=3571&SPSID=40673 4/1/2002 Press release regarding the Dog Walk and other matters] ] The Dawg walk was revived when Mark Richt took over as football coach. The famous Redcoat band traditionally leads the Dawg walk.

Rivalries

The Bulldogs have three main rivals, Auburn, Georgia Tech and Florida Gators. All three rivalries commenced over 100 years ago. With long rivalries, it is not surprising that there is some disagreement over the records between the schools. For example, Georgia discredits two games in 1943 and 1944 against Georgia Tech, both UGA losses, because some of their players were in the war, despite the fact that they claim a Rose Bowl victory in 1943. Fact|date=June 2008

Team awards and records

National championships

Years in which the Bulldogs finished with a number-one ranking in at least one of the final national polls recognized by the College Football Hall of Fame and included in the official NCAA Football Record Book:cite web | url=http://www.ncaa.org/champadmin/ia_football_past_champs.html | title=Past Division I-A Football National Champions| accessdate=2007-01-13| format=HTML |publisher= ncaa.org |language=English ]

*1980 - The Bulldogs beat Notre Dame 17–10 in the Sugar Bowl to finish 12-0 and claim the National Championship. Notable contributors during the season included Herschel Walker, Buck Belue and Lindsay Scott (Georgia was listed first by AP, Berryman, FACT, FB News, FW, Helms, National Championship Foundation, NFF, Poling, Sporting News & UPI).

Other years in which the Bulldogs finished with a number-one ranking in at least one of the final national polls and included in the official NCAA Football Record Book:
*1927 - With a 9-1-0 record, the Bulldogs were called the "dream and wonder team" and were ranked No. 1 in the nation with one regular season game remaining, but were upset by Georgia Tech by a score of 12-0 at Grant Field in Atlanta, Georgia. [cite web | url=http://www.georgiadogs.com/ViewArticle.dbml?SPSID=46724&SPID=3571&DB_OEM_ID=8800&ATCLID=526158| title=Football National Championships | accessdate=2007-01-12| date =2006-08-02| format=HTML | publisher=UGA Sports Communications| language=English ] Nevertheless, at the end of the season, Georgia was ranked number 1 in two polls recognized by the NCAA. [cite web | url=http://www.ncaa.org/champadmin/ia_football_past_champs.html | title=Past Division I-A Football National Champions| accessdate=2007-01-13| format=HTML |publisher= ncaa.org |language=English Georgia listed number one by Boand System and Poling System. Illinois was listed number one in five of the nine polls recognized by the NCAA. ] The Bulldogs were also listed as number 1 in two other polls of the 1927 season, but most recognize Illinois as the 1927 National Champion. [*cite web | url=http://www.cfbdatawarehouse.com/data/national_championships/yearly_results.php?year=1927|title=1927 National Championships| accessdate=2007-01-13| year =2007 | format=HTML | publisher=College Football Data Warehouse| language=English Georgia also listed number 1 by 1st-N-Goal and James Howell. Illinois was listed number one in a total of 14 polls.] seealso|1927 Georgia Bulldogs football team

*1942 - 11–1 Georgia was consensus champions, being chosen by at least half of the recognized polls. Georgia was led by All-Americans Frank Sinkwich and end George Poschner, along with a young back named Charley Trippi. The Bulldogs knocked off 9 consecutive opponents and ranked No. 1 in the nation. Georgia earned a Rose Bowl bid after it blanked Georgia Tech 34–0 in Athens to end the regular season. Georgia then edged UCLA 9-0 in the Rose Bowl
*1946 - 11–0 Georgia was listed first by Williamson System.
*1968 - 8–1–2 Georgia was listed first by Litkenhous.

Conference championships

Georgia has won a total of 14 conference championships, including 12 SEC Championships.

Conference affiliations:
*1891-95, Independent
*1896-1920, Southern Intercollegiate Athletic Association
*1921-32, Southern Conference
*1933-present, Southeastern Conference

Other

*Georgia's victory over Auburn on November 11, 2006 was the Bulldogs' 700th win.

Players

National award winners

*Heisman Trophy:Frank Sinkwich - 1942:Herschel Walker - 1982
*Maxwell Award:Charley Trippi - 1946:Herschel Walker - 1982
*Walter Camp Award:Herschel Walker - 1982
*Bronko Nagurski Trophy:Champ Bailey - 1998
*Chuck Bednarik Award:David Pollack - 2004
*Doak Walker Award:Garrison Hearst - 1992
*Draddy Trophy:Matt Stinchcomb - 1998
*"'ESPY Award:Garrison Hearst - 1992
*Lombardi Award:David Pollack - 2004
*Lott Trophy:David Pollack - 2004
*Outland Trophy:Bill Stanfill - 1968
*Ted Hendricks Award:David Pollack - 2003, 2004

All-Americans

The Bulldogs have had 66 players selected as All-Americans. [ [http://www.georgiadogs.com/attachments1/1420.pdf?SPSID=46736&SPID=3571&DB_OEM_ID=8800 All-American Georgia Bulldogs] ] Of those 66 players, 23 were consensus All-Americans, as so-designated by NCAA rules. [ [http://www.ncaa.org/library/records/football/football_records_book/2006/2006_d1_football_records_book.pdf Official 2006 NCAA Divisions I-A and II-A Football Records Book] , pp 213-228] While several players were selected in more than one year, only Frank Sinkwich, Herschel Walker and David Pollack were selected as consensus All-Americans more than once. Herschell Walker was a three-time unanimous consensus All-American.

The Georgia Bulldogs football players that have been selected as All-Americans are:

College Football Hall of Fame

Eleven former players have been inducted in the College Football Hall of Fame. [ [http://www.georgiadogs.com/attachments1/1424.pdf?SPSID=46736&SPID=3571&DB_OEM_ID=8800 Hall of Fame Bulldogs] ] In addition, one former player, Pat Dye has been inducted into the Hall as a coach. The ten players inducted into the Hall are:
*Bob McWhorter, inducted in 1954
*Frank Sinkwich, inducted in 1954
*Charley Trippi, inducted in 1959
*Vernon "Catfish" Smith, inducted in 1979
*Bill Hartman, inducted in 1984
*Fran Tarkenton, inducted in 1987
*Bill Stanfill, inducted in 1998
*Herschel Walker, inducted in 1999
*Terry Hoage, inducted in 2000
*Kevin Butler, inducted in 2001
*John Rauch, inducted in 2003

Other notable former players

These former players are listed by their last year of play at Georgia:
*Joe Tereshinski, Sr. Tight End (1942–1946), played eight seasons in the NFL for the Washington Redskins
*Pat Dye, guard (1957–1960), inducted into the College Football Hall of Famer as a coach (Auburn University)
*Jake Scott, Free Safety (1966–1969), played nine seasons in the NFL for the Miami Dolphins and Washington Redskins, member of the undefeated 1972 Miami Dolphins, Super Bowl MVP in 1972, five Pro Bowls
*Ray Donaldson, Center (1976–1979), played 17 seasons in the NFL for the Baltimore Colts, Indianapolis Colts, Seattle Seahawks and Dallas Cowboys, six Pro Bowls, first African-American to play Center in the NFL
*Rodney Hampton, running Back (1987–1989), first round draft pick by the New York Giants, two Pro Bowls
*John Kasay, Placekicker (1987–1990), 2006 was his 15th season in the NFL, 1996 Pro Bowl selection; currently plays for the Carolina Panthers
*Mack Strong, Fullback (1990–1993), has played his 13 years in the NFL for the Seattle Seahawks
*Todd Peterson, Kicker (1991–1993), has played 13 years in the NFL, most recently with the Atlanta Falcons
*Terrell Davis, Running Back (1991–1994), played seven years in the NFL for the Denver Broncos, Super Bowl MVP in 1998
*Hines Ward, Wide Receiver (1995–1998), currently plays in the NFL for the Pittsburgh Steelers, Super Bowl MVP in 2005
*Marcus Stroud, Defensive Tackle (1996-2000), currently plays in the NFL for the Buffalo Bills, three-time All-Pro
*Kendrell Bell, Linebacker (1997–2000), Defensive Rookie of the Year in 2001, currently plays for the Kansas City Chiefs
*Quincy Carter, Quarterback (1997–2000), with the Dallas Cowboys for three seasons, the New York Jets for one
*Randy McMichael, Tight End (1998–2001), plays in the NFL for the St. Louis Rams
*Verron Haynes, fullback (1998–2001), plays in the NFL for the Pittsburgh Steelers
*Musa Smith, Running Back (2000–2003), third round draft pick by the Baltimore Ravens, where he is currently playing
*Jon Stinchcomb, Offensive Tackle (1999–2003), plays in the NFL for the New Orleans Saints
*Ben Watson, Tight End (2000–2003), first round draft pick by the New England Patriots, where he is currently playing
*Reggie Brown, Wide Receiver (2001–2004), plays in the NFL for the Philadelphia Eagles
*Mo Lewis, Linebacker (1991–2003), played in the NFL for the New York Jets
*David Greene, Quarterback (2001–2004), is the winningest quarterback in the history of the NCAA's Football Bowl Subdivision.
*Odell Thurman, Linebacker (2001–2004), plays in the NFL for the Cincinnati Bengals
*Thomas Davis, Linebacker (2001–2004), plays in the NFL for the Carolina Panthers
*D.J. Shockley, Quarterback (2002–2005), plays in the NFL for the Atlanta Falcons
*Tim Jennings, Cornerback (2002–2005), plays in the NFL for the Indianapolis Colts
*Leonard Pope, Tight End (2003–2005), plays in the NFL for the Arizona Cardinals
*Tony Gilbert, Linebacker, plays in the NFL for the Jacksonville Jaguars
*George Foster, Offensive Tackle, plays in the NFL for the Detroit Lions
*Billy Koehler, Offensive Tackle, Defensive Tackle, Walk on of the Year, 2005, Chik-fil-A Flag Football Team MVP 2007

Current (2008) notable players

*Matthew Stafford, Quarterback, Jr.
*Knowshon Moreno, Tailback, So.
*Dannell Ellerbe, Linebacker, Sr.
*Mohammed Massaquoi, Receiver, Sr.
*Brannan Southerland, Fullback, Sr.
*Asher Allen, Cornerback, Jr.
*Jeff Owens, Defensive Tackle, Sr.
*Geno Atkins, Defensive Tackle, Sr.
*Caleb King, Tailback, Fr.
*AJ Green, Receiver, Fr.

*The full 2008 team roster can be found at The University of Georgia Bulldog's official website. [http://www.georgiadogs.com/SportSelect.dbml?DB_OEM_ID=8800&KEY=&SPID=3571&SPSID=40675]

Coaching history

Head coaching records

The Bulldogs have had 25 head coaches:

Coaching awards

*Amos Alonzo Stagg Award:Vince Dooley - 2001
*Paul "Bear" Bryant Award:Vince Dooley - 1980
*Broyles Award:Brian VanGorder - 2003
*College Football Hall of Fame:*Glenn “Pop” Warner, inducted in 1951:*Joel Hunt, inducted in 1967:*Wally Butts, inducted in 1997:*Vince Dooley, inducted in 1995

ee also

*Georgia Bulldogs
*Uga (mascot)
*The World's Largest Outdoor Cocktail Party
*Deep South's Oldest Rivalry
*Clean, Old-Fashioned Hate
*Southeastern Conference

References

uggested reading

*Stegeman, John F. (1997). "The Ghosts of Herty Field: Early Days on a Southern Gridiron", Athens, Georgia: University of Georgia Press. ISBN 0820319597
*Reed, Thomas Walter (1949). Athens, Georgia: University of Georgia Press. "History of the University of Georgia Chapter XVII: Athletics at the University from the Beginning Through 1947" [http://dlg.galileo.usg.edu/cgi-bin/ebind2html.pl/reed_c17 imprint pages 3420-3691]

External links

* [http://www.georgiadogs.com/SportSelect.dbml?DB_OEM_ID=8800&KEY=&SPID=3571&SPSID=40673 The Official Site of the Georgia Bulldogs]
* [http://www.dawgs.com/ Dawgs.com - Georgia Bulldog Fan Forum and Official Team Merchandise]


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