On Approval (play)


On Approval (play)

On Approval is a 1926 play by Frederick Lonsdale. The play premiered at the Watford Palace Theatre in Hertford. Its American premiere was at the Gaiety Theatre on Oct 18, 1926 where it ran for 96 performances. The American cast consisted of Wallace Eddinger, Violet Kemble-Cooper, Kathlene MacDonell, and Hugh Wakefield.

Contents

Plot summary

Exacting and difficult Maria Wislack (Lillie) is a widow who decides to take Richard (Culver) away to her Scottish island for a month's trial "on approval" to see if they are compatible for possible marriage. The egotistical and difficult Duke of Bristol (Brook, who is friends with Richard) wangles it so he might be there as well. By chance, they meet Helen (Withers) in Scotland (who is in love with the Duke) and circumstances makes all four of them stay on the island for the month. Due to the bad behaviour of Maria and the Duke, Helen and Richard decide not to marry either of them and they leave them stranded on the island. The Duke and Maria pretend to be romantically involved to make the other two jealous, but end up marrying each other instead.

Film adaptation

The 1930 British comedy film was directed by and starred Tom Walls, also featuring Yvonne Arnaud, Winifred Shotter and Robertson Hare.[1]

The 1944 British comedy film starred Clive Brook, Beatrice Lillie, Googie Withers and Roland Culver. Brook not only stars, but also directed, produced and wrote the adaptation. Although Culver, Lillie and Brook were older than the characters in the play, Brook changed the setting to the late Victorian era, which makes their ages seem a bit more acceptable. On Approval is one of the few films Beatrice Lillie made during her long (primarily stage and concert) career.

The film started with a prologue of newsreel footage and amusing narration by famed British radio commentator E.V.H. Emmett. By changing the setting to the late Victorian era, Brook made what Lindsay Anderson called 'the funniest British light comedy ever made."

References

External links


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Look at other dictionaries:

  • play to the gallery — {v. phr.} To try to get the approval of the audience. * /Whenever John recites in class he seems to be playing to the gallery./ * /The lawyer for the defense was more interested in playing to the gallery than in winning the case./ Compare: SHOW… …   Dictionary of American idioms

  • play to the gallery — {v. phr.} To try to get the approval of the audience. * /Whenever John recites in class he seems to be playing to the gallery./ * /The lawyer for the defense was more interested in playing to the gallery than in winning the case./ Compare: SHOW… …   Dictionary of American idioms

  • play to — [phrasal verb] 1 play to (someone or something) : to behave or perform in a particular way for (someone or something) in order to get approval or attention He didn t mean what he was saying. He was just playing to the crowd. He loves publicity… …   Useful english dictionary

  • play — I. noun Etymology: Middle English, from Old English plega; akin to Old English plegan to play, Middle Dutch pleyen Date: before 12th century 1. a. swordplay b. archaic game, sport c. the conduct, course, or action of a game …   New Collegiate Dictionary

  • Play-by-post role-playing game — Not to be confused with Play by mail game. an example of an online PbP role playing game A play by post game (PbP) is an online text based role playing game. This is a niche area of the online roleplaying community which caters to both gamers and …   Wikipedia

  • play up to — {v. phr.}. {slang} 1. To try to gain the favor of, especially for selfish reasons; act to win the approval of; try to please. * /He played up to the boss./ 2. To use (something) to gain an end; to attend to (a weakness). * /He played up to the… …   Dictionary of American idioms

  • play up to — {v. phr.}. {slang} 1. To try to gain the favor of, especially for selfish reasons; act to win the approval of; try to please. * /He played up to the boss./ 2. To use (something) to gain an end; to attend to (a weakness). * /He played up to the… …   Dictionary of American idioms

  • play to the gallery — verb To appeal to the least sophisticated parts of an audience in order to obtain maximum approval …   Wiktionary

  • play\ to\ the\ gallery — v. phr. To try to get the approval of the audience. Whenever John recites in class he seems to be playing to the gallery. The lawyer for the defense was more interested in playing to the gallery than in winning the case. Compare: show off …   Словарь американских идиом

  • play\ up\ to — v. phr.. slang 1. To try to gain the favor of, especially for selfish reasons; act to win the approval of; try to please. He played up to the boss. 2. To use (smth) to gain an end; to attend to (a weakness). He played up to the old lady s vanity… …   Словарь американских идиом