New Zealand literature


New Zealand literature
Literature Portal
Topics
Epic • Romance • Novel • Prose • Poetry • Books • Authors • Awards • Basic Topics • Literary Terms • Criticism • Theory
Middle-Eastern Literature
Ancient literature • Sumerian literature • Babylonian literature • Ancient Egyptian literature • Hebrew literature • Pahlavi literature • Persian literature • Arabic literature • Israeli literature
European Literature
Greek literature • Latin literature
Early Medieval literature
Matter of Rome • Matter of France • Matter of Britain
Medieval literature
Renaissance literature
History of modern literature
Structuralism • Deconstruction • Poststructuralism • Modernism • Postmodernism • Post-colonialism • Hypertext fiction
North and South American Literature
Latin American literature • Argentine literature • Brazilian literature • Canadian literature • Colombian literature • Cuban literature • Jamaican literature • Mexican literature • Peruvian literature • Literature of the United States
Australasian Literature
Australian literature • New Zealand literature
Asian Literature
Asian literature • Chinese literature • Japanese literature • Korean literature • Vietnamese literature
Indian Sub-Continent Literature
Sanskrit literature
Indian literature • Pakistani literature • Assamese literature • Bengali literature • Gujarati literature • Hindi literature • Kannada literature • Kashmiri literature • Malayalam literature • Marathi literature • Nepali literature • Rajasthani literature • Sindhi literature • Tamil literature • Telugu literature • Urdu literature • Indian writing in English
African Literature
African literature • Nigerian literature • Moroccan literature • South African literature • Swahili literature
Other Topics
History of theatre • History of science fiction • History of ideas • Intellectual history • List of years in literature • Literature by nationality

New Zealand literature is essentially literature in English that is either written by New Zealanders, or migrants, dealing with New Zealand themes or places and is primarily a 20th Century creation. New Zealand literature is almost exclusively literature in the English language and as such a sub-type of English literature.

Contents

Early Maori literature

The Māori were a pre-literate stone-aged culture until contact with Europeans in the early 19th Century. New Zealand acknowledges the presence of its indigenous Māori and the special place they have in New Zealand culture. Oratory and recitation of quasi historical / hagiographical ancestral blood lines has a special place in Māori culture, eurocentric notions of 'literature' may fail to describe the Māori cultural forms in the oral tradition.

In the early nineteenth century Christian missionaries developed written forms of Polynesian languages to assist with their evangelical work. The oral tradition of story telling and folklore has survived and the early missionaries collected folk tales. In the pre-colonial period there was no literature, after European contact and the introduction of literacy there were Māori language publications. No literary works in Māori have been translated and become widely read. The Māori language has survived to the present day and although not widely spoken is used in as medium of instruction in education in a small number of schools. As far as Māori literature can be said to exist, it is principally literature in English dealing with Māori themes.

Poetry

New Zealand poetry, like all poetry, is influenced by time and place and has been through a number of changes. Poetry has been part of New Zealand culture since before European settlement in the form of Māori sung poems or waiata. The first colonial Pakeha poetry was also predominantly sung poetry. Initially colonial poetry had a preoccupation with British themes. New Zealand poetry developed a strong local voice from the 1950s, and has now become a "polyphony" of traditionally marginalised voices. [1]

Writers

Novelists Patricia Grace, Albert Wendt, Maurice Gee and children’s author Margaret Mahy, are prominent in New Zealand.[2]

Keri Hulme gained prominence when her novel, The Bone People, won the Booker Prize. Witi Ihimaera wrote the novel that became the critically acclaimed movie Whale Rider, directed by Nikki Caro. His works deal with Māori life in the modern world, often incorporating fantastic elements.

Writers claimed by New Zealand as its own include immigrants, such as South African-born Robin Hyde, and emigrants who went into exile but wrote about New Zealand, like Dan Davin and Katherine Mansfield. Erewhon, a novel set in New Zealand and written by Samuel Butler as a result of a stay in New Zealand, arguably belongs primarily to English literature. Likewise the New Zealand work of Karl Wolfskehl, resulting from his sojourn in Auckland, belongs rather to the story of German literature.

Playwrights

New Zealand has a lively community of playwrights in theatre. One of the country's most significant and successful playwrights is Roger Hall. Support for playwrights and plays in New Zealand is provided by Playmarket, a national organisation which also publishes and sells plays and scripts. Playmarket also represents Māori and Pacific Island playwrights.

See also

References

  1. ^ Green, P., & Ricketts, H. (2010). 99 Ways into New Zealand Poetry. Auckland: Random House.
  2. ^ Swarbrick, Nancy (updated 13 January 2009). "Creative life". Te Ara - the Encyclopedia of New Zealand. http://www.teara.govt.nz/NewZealandInBrief/CreativeLife/6/en. Retrieved 2009-04-26. 

Further reading

External links


Wikimedia Foundation. 2010.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • New Zealand literature — Introduction       the body of literatures, both oral and written, produced in New Zealand. Maori narrative: the oral tradition       Like all Polynesian peoples, the Maori, who began to occupy the islands now called New Zealand about 1,000 years …   Universalium

  • New Zealand — New Zealander. /zee leuhnd/ a country in the S Pacific, SE of Australia, consisting of North Island, South Island, and adjacent small islands: a member of the Commonwealth of Nations. 3,587,275; 103,416 sq. mi. (267,845 sq. km). Cap.: Wellington …   Universalium

  • New Zealand — • Consists of three main islands (North Island, South Island, sometimes also called Middle island, and Stewart island) and several groups of smaller islands . . . Catholic Encyclopedia. Kevin Knight. 2006. New Zealand     New Zealand …   Catholic encyclopedia

  • New Zealand studies — is the academic field of Area studies of New Zealand. Subfields: History of New Zealand Literature of New Zealand Politics of New Zealand Economy of New Zealand Culture of New Zealand Institutions in New Zealand: Victoria University of Wellington …   Wikipedia

  • New Zealand — This article is about the country. For other uses, see New Zealand (disambiguation). NZ redirects here. For other uses, see NZ (disambiguation). New Zealand Aotearoa …   Wikipedia

  • New Zealand Book Council — The New Zealand Book Council is a not for profit organisation that presents a wide range of programmes that promote books and reading. It was established in 1972 as a response to UNESCO s International Book Year [1]. The Book Council is based in… …   Wikipedia

  • Literature of New Zealand — New Zealand claims as its own many writers, even those immigrants born overseas, like South African born Robin Hyde, or those emigrants who went into exile but wrote about New Zealand, like Dan Davin and Katherine Mansfield. Exceptionsclarifyme… …   Wikipedia

  • New Zealand English — (NZE, en NZ[1]) is the form of the English language used in New Zealand. The English language was established in New Zealand by colonists during the 19th century. The most distinctive influences on New Zealand English have come from Australian… …   Wikipedia

  • New Zealand Railways Corporation — Type State owned enterprise Industry Transport Founded 1982 Headquarters Wellington, New Zealand …   Wikipedia

  • New Zealand wars — New Zealand Land Wars Memorial in the Auckland War Memorial Museum for those who died, both European and Māori, in the New Zealand Wars. Kia mate toa can be translated as fight unto death or be strong in death , and is the motto of the …   Wikipedia


Share the article and excerpts

Direct link
Do a right-click on the link above
and select “Copy Link”

We are using cookies for the best presentation of our site. Continuing to use this site, you agree with this.