15th Legislative District (New Jersey)


15th Legislative District (New Jersey)
New Jersey's 15th Legislative district
Census Bureau map of New Jersey's 15th Legislative District.gif
New Jersey State Senator Shirley Turner (D)
New Jersey General Assemblymembers Reed Gusciora (D)
Bonnie Watson Coleman (D)
Registration 28.5% Democratic
11.0% Republican
60.5% Independent
Demographics 58.8% White
29.2% Black
11.7% Hispanic
3.6% Asian
Population 201,335
Voting-age population 154,009
Registered voters 112,965

New Jersey's 15th Legislative District is one of 40 in the state, covering the Mercer County municipalities of Ewing Township, Hopewell Borough, Hopewell Township, Lawrence Township, Pennington Borough, Princeton Borough, Princeton Township and Trenton.[1] As of the 2000 United States Census, the district had a population of 212,000.[2]

Contents

Demographic characteristics

The district includes New Jersey's capital, Trenton and a number of its comparatively wealthier suburbs to the north. The district has the smallest population of any district in the state, and has a comparatively higher percentage of African-American residents and a notable percentage of children in the Temporary Assistance for Needy Families program. Registered Democrats outnumber Republicans by an almost 3 to 1 margin.[3][4]

Political representation

The district is represented in the New Jersey Senate by Shirley Turner (D, Lawrenceville) and in the New Jersey General Assembly by Reed Gusciora (D, Borough of Princeton) and Bonnie Watson Coleman (D, Ewing Township).[5]

Election history

The district had been solidly Republican until 1982, when redistricting following the 1980 United States Census added Trenton to the district, and made the 15th a strongly Democratic district.[6][7] The 1981 elections brought in Democrats Gerald R. Stockman in the Senate, along with Gerald S. Naples and John S. Watson in the Assembly. The trio remained together in office for a decade.

New Jersey Lottery television host ran as a Republican in 1991, having registered with the party only five days before that year's filing deadline. He defeated incumbent Gerald R. Stockman by a narrow 50.9%-49.1% margin.[8] His Republican running mate John W. Hartmann knocked off Naples, while Democrat Watson was narrowly re-elected to a sixth term in office. Hartmann, a 24-year-old student at the Seton Hall University School of Law, became the youngest Republican ever elected to the Assembly.[9]

In the 1993 elections, Democrats sought to recoup their losses suffered in the 1991 Republican landslide. In the Assembly, Shirley Turner and Joseph Yuhas ran for office, winning back Hartmann's seat from the Republicans. LaRossa faced Stockman for a second time in 1993, with the incumbent receiving endorsements from the AFL-CIO, locals of the Communication Workers of America and the New Jersey State Patrolmen's Benevolent Association.[10] LaRossa won re-election despite the challenge.[11]

Yuhas stepped down after a single term in office and was replaced on the ballot in 1995 by Reed Gusciora.[12]

Session State Senate[6] Assembly[7]
1976-1977 Wayne Dumont Donald J. Albanese Robert Littell
1978-1979 Wayne Dumont Donald J. Albanese Robert Littell
1980-1981 Donald J. Albanese Robert Littell
1982-1983 Gerald R. Stockman Gerald S. Naples John S. Watson
1984-1985 Gerald R. Stockman Gerald S. Naples John S. Watson
1986-1987 Gerald S. Naples John S. Watson
1988-1989 Gerald R. Stockman Gerald S. Naples John S. Watson
1990-1991[13] Gerald S. Naples John S. Watson
1992-1993 Dick LaRossa John W. Hartmann John S. Watson
1994-1995[11] Dick LaRossa Shirley Turner Joseph Yuhas
1996-1997 Reed Gusciora Shirley Turner
1998-1999[14] Shirley Turner Reed Gusciora Bonnie Watson Coleman
2000-2001[15] Reed Gusciora Bonnie Watson Coleman
2002-2003[16] Shirley Turner Reed Gusciora Bonnie Watson Coleman
2004-2005[17] Shirley Turner Reed Gusciora Bonnie Watson Coleman
2006-2007 Reed Gusciora Bonnie Watson Coleman
2008-2009 Shirley Turner Reed Gusciora Bonnie Watson Coleman
2010-2011 Reed Gusciora Bonnie Watson Coleman

References

  1. ^ Districts by Number, New Jersey Legislature. Accessed June 24, 2010.
  2. ^ DP-1. Profile of General Demographic Characteristics: 2000 for General Assembly District 15, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed June 24, 2010.
  3. ^ District 15 Profile, Rutgers University. Accessed June 23, 2010.
  4. ^ 2005 New Jersey Legislative District Data Book. Edward J. Bloustein School of Planning and Public Policy. p. 72. 
  5. ^ "Legislative Roster: 2010-2011 Session". New Jersey Legislature. http://www.njleg.state.nj.us/members/roster.asp. Retrieved 2010-06-24. 
  6. ^ a b NJ Senate District 15 - History, OurCampaigns.com. Accessed June 24, 2010.
  7. ^ a b NJ Assembly 15 - History, OurCampaigns.com. Accessed June 24, 2010.
  8. ^ Gray, Jerry. "Television's 'Lottery Guy' Strives to Stay in Senate", The New York Times, September 4, 1992. Accessed June 24, 2010.
  9. ^ Gray, Jerry. "A Legislature With a Less Urban Tone", The New York Times, November 14, 1991. Accessed June 24, 2010.
  10. ^ Sullivan, Joseph F. "'90 Tax Rise Overshadows Trenton Races", The New York Times, October 18, 1993. Accessed June 24, 2010.
  11. ^ a b Sullivan, Joseph F. "THE 1993 ELECTIONS: New Jersey Legislature; Cut Taxes 30 Percent? Whitman's Top Statehouse Allies Say Not So Fast", The New York Times, November 4, 1993. Accessed June 23, 2010.
  12. ^ Edge, Wally. "Where are they now?", PolitickerNJ.com, November 10, 2006. Accessed June 24, 2010.
  13. ^ Staff. "Vote Totals for the Elections Held on Tuesday in New York and New Jersey", The New York Times, November 9, 1989. Accessed June 23, 2010.
  14. ^ Staff. "THE 1997 ELECTIONS: RESULTS; The Races for the New Jersey Assembly", The New York Times, November 5, 1997. Accessed June 23, 2010.
  15. ^ Kocieniewski, David. "THE 1999 ELECTIONS: NEW JERSEY ASSEMBLY; Democrats Win Seats in Three Districts, Narrowing Republicans' Majority", The New York Times, November 3, 1999. Accessed June 23, 2010.
  16. ^ Staff. "THE 2001 ELECTIONS; RESULTS -- The Races for New Jersey", The New York Times, November 8, 2001. Accessed June 23, 2010.
  17. ^ Kocieniewski, David. "THE 2003 ELECTION: THE STATEHOUSE; Democrats Seize Senate And Widen Assembly Gap", The New York Times, November 5, 2003. Accessed June 23, 2010.

Wikimedia Foundation. 2010.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • New Jersey Legislative Districts, 2001 apportionment — New Jersey Legislature 210th through 214th Legislatures Type Type …   Wikipedia

  • Jersey City, New Jersey — City of Jersey City   City   Skyline of Downtown Jersey City …   Wikipedia

  • New Jersey's 7th congressional district — NJ 7 redirects here. NJ 7 may also refer to New Jersey Route 7. New Jersey s 7th congressional district Current Representative Leonard Lance ( …   Wikipedia

  • Ho-Ho-Kus, New Jersey — Infobox Settlement official name = Ho Ho Kus, New Jersey nickname = motto = imagesize = image caption = image imagesize = image caption = image mapsize = 250px map caption = Map highlighting Ho Ho Kus s location within Bergen County. Inset:… …   Wikipedia

  • Borough of Princeton, New Jersey — See also: Princeton Township, New Jersey and Princeton, New Jersey Infobox Settlement official name = Borough of Princeton, New Jersey settlement type = Borough nickname = motto = imagesize = image caption = image mapsize = 250x200px map caption …   Wikipedia

  • Lawrence Township, Mercer County, New Jersey — For the municipality of the same name in Cumberland County, see Lawrence Township, Cumberland County, New Jersey. Lawrence Township, New Jersey   Township   …   Wikipedia

  • Hopewell, New Jersey — See also: Hopewell Township, Mercer County, New JerseyInfobox Settlement official name = Hopewell, New Jersey settlement type = Borough nickname = motto = imagesize = image caption = image mapsize = 250x200px map caption = Hopewell highlighted in …   Wikipedia

  • Princeton Township, New Jersey — See also: the Borough of Princeton, New Jersey and Princeton, New Jersey Infobox Settlement official name = Township of Princeton, New Jersey settlement type = Township nickname = motto = imagesize = image caption = image mapsize = 250x200px map… …   Wikipedia

  • Mantoloking, New Jersey —   Borough   …   Wikipedia

  • Hopewell Township, Mercer County, New Jersey — see also: the Borough of Hopewell, New Jersey, Hopewell Township, Cumberland County, New Jersey Infobox Settlement official name = Township of Hopewell, New Jersey nickname = motto = imagesize = image caption = image mapsize = 250x200px map… …   Wikipedia