Narsai (Nestorian Patriarch)


Narsai (Nestorian Patriarch)

Narsai was Patriarch of the Church of the East during a period of schism from 524 to 537. Unlike his opponent Elishaʿ, who is included in the traditional list of patriarchs of the Church of the East, Narsai, has traditionally been considered an anti-patriarch.

Contents

Sources

Brief accounts of Narsai's reign are given in the Ecclesiastical Chronicle of the Jacobite writer Bar Hebraeus (floruit 1280) and in the ecclesiastical histories of the Nestorian writers Mari (twelfth-century), ʿAmr (fourteenth-century) and Sliba (fourteenth-century). A long and detailed account of the schism of Narsai and Elishaʿ is given in the Chronicle of Seert.[1]

Narsai's patriarchate

The following account of Narsai's reign is given by Bar Hebraeus:

Shila died after a while in office. Then a schism arose among the bishops. Some of them supported Elishaʿ, the son-in-law of Shila, and consecrated him catholicus in the church of Ctesiphon; while others supported a man called Narsaï, and consecrated him catholicus in the great church of Seleucia. Each of them began to appoint bishops for the vacant churches, and ultimately Elishaʿ prevailed with the support of the king and shut up Narsaï in a prison. Narsaï died shortly afterwards, and Elishaʿ began to hope that he would be firmly established in the leadership; but the bishops assembled together and degraded him from his rank. [2]

See also

  • List of Patriarchs of the Church of the East

Notes

  1. ^ Chronicle of Seert (ed. Scher), ii. 55–60
  2. ^ Bar Hebraeus, Ecclesiastical Chronicle (ed. Abeloos and Lamy), ii. 82

References

  • Abbeloos, J. B., and Lamy, T. J., Bar Hebraeus, Chronicon Ecclesiasticum (3 vols, Paris, 1877)
  • Assemani, J. A., De Catholicis seu Patriarchis Chaldaeorum et Nestorianorum (Rome, 1775)
  • Brooks, E. W., Eliae Metropolitae Nisibeni Opus Chronologicum (Rome, 1910)
  • Gismondi, H., Maris, Amri, et Salibae: De Patriarchis Nestorianorum Commentaria I: Amri et Salibae Textus (Rome, 1896)
  • Gismondi, H., Maris, Amri, et Salibae: De Patriarchis Nestorianorum Commentaria II: Maris textus arabicus et versio Latina (Rome, 1899)
  • Scher, Addai (ed. and tr.). Histoire nestorienne inédite: Chronique de Séert. Première partie. Patrologia Orientalis 4.3 (1908), 5.2 (1910).
  • Scher, Addai (ed. and tr.). Histoire nestorienne inédite: Chronique de Séert. Seconde partie. Patrologia Orientalis 7.2 (1911), 13.4 (1919).

External links

Preceded by
Shila
(503–23)
Catholicus-Patriarch of the East
(524–37)
Succeeded by
Paul
(539)

Wikimedia Foundation. 2010.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Babai (Nestorian Patriarch) — For other uses, see Babai (disambiguation). Babai, also Babaeus, was Patriarch of the Church of the East (the Persian Church), from 497 – 503. Under his leadership, the Persian Church became increasingly aligned with the Nestorian movement,… …   Wikipedia

  • Mari (Nestorian Patriarch) — Mari bar Toba was Patriarch of the Church of the East from 987 to 999. Contents 1 Sources 2 Mari s patriarchate 3 See also 4 Notes 5 …   Wikipedia

  • Timothy I (Nestorian Patriarch) — For the Eastern Orthodox patriarch who died in 523, see Patriarch Timothy I of Constantinople. Timothy I, patriarch of the Church of the East from 780 to 823, is widely considered to be one of the most impressive patriarchs in the long history of …   Wikipedia

  • Narsai (disambiguation) — Narsai may refer to: Narsai, Syriac poet theologian Narsai (Nestorian Patriarch), Patriarch of the Church of the East Narsai of Adiabene, the Parthian client king of Adiabene Narsai David, an author, radio and television personality in the Bay… …   Wikipedia

  • Mana (patriarch) — Maʿna served briefly as bishop of Seleucia Ctesiphon, grand metropolitan and primate of the Church of the East in 420. Like several other early bishops of Seleucia Ctesiphon, he is included in the traditional list of patriarchs of the Church of… …   Wikipedia

  • Isaac (patriarch) — Isaac was bishop of Seleucia Ctesiphon, grand metropolitan and primate of the Church of the East from 399 to 410. He is included in the traditional list of patriarchs of the Church of the East. Contents 1 Sources 2 Isaac s reign 3 See also 4 …   Wikipedia

  • Tirhan (East Syrian Diocese) — The Diocese of Tirhan was a diocese of the Church of the East s Province of the Patriarch. The diocese is attested between the sixth and fourteenth centuries. Contents 1 History 2 Bishops of Tirhan 3 Topographical survey …   Wikipedia

  • Denha II — was patriarch of the Church of the East from 1336/7 to 1381/2. Although no history of his reign has survived, references in a number of Nestorian, Jacobite and Moslem sources provide some details of his patriarchate. Contents 1 Order of… …   Wikipedia

  • Assyrian Church of the East — Assyrian Christian redirects here. For other uses, see Assyrian (disambiguation). Assyrian Church of the East Emblem of the Assyrian Church of the East Founder Traces origins to Saints Thomas, Bartholomew, Thaddeus (Addai) …   Wikipedia

  • Syriac Language and Literature — • Syriac is the important branch of the group of Semitic languages known as Aramaic Catholic Encyclopedia. Kevin Knight. 2006. Syriac Language and Literature     Syriac Language and Literature …   Catholic encyclopedia


Share the article and excerpts

Direct link
Do a right-click on the link above
and select “Copy Link”

We are using cookies for the best presentation of our site. Continuing to use this site, you agree with this.