List of NHL statistical leaders


List of NHL statistical leaders

This is a list of National Hockey League (NHL) statistical leaders through the end of the 2010–11 NHL season.

Most of these records are dominated by Canadian players, due to the traditional popularity of ice hockey in Canada. In the past, most NHL players were from Canada, and even today roughly half of all NHL players are born in Canada (52.3% in the 2008–09 season). To distinguish players of different nations, a flag is placed beside players born outside of Canada based on their place of birth; the Canadian flag (Canada) will not be shown next to Canadian-born players in order to avoid visual clutter.


Contents

Skaters
All-time leaders
Regular season points
Regular season points per game
Regular season goals
Regular season goals per game
Regular season powerplay goals
Regular season short-handed goals
Regular season game-winning goals
Regular season overtime goals
Regular season assists
Regular season assists per game
Regular season games played
Regular season penalty minutes
Regular season plus-minus
Regular season shots on goal
Regular season shooting percentage
Playoff points
Playoff points per game
Playoff goals
Playoff goals per game
Playoff powerplay goals
Playoff short-handed goals
Playoff game-winning goals
Playoff overtime goals
Playoff assists
Playoff games played
Playoff penalty minutes
Playoff plus-minus
Playoff shots on goal
Playoff shooting percentage
Active leaders
Regular season points
Regular season points per game
Regular season goals
Regular season goals per game
Regular season powerplay goals
Regular season short-handed goals
Regular season game-winning goals
Regular season overtime goals
Regular season assists
Regular season assists per game
Regular season games played
Regular season penalty minutes
Regular season plus-minus
Regular season shots on goal
Regular season shooting percentage
Playoff points
Playoff goals
Playoff goals per game
Playoff powerplay goals
Playoff short-handed goals
Playoff game-winning goals
Playoff overtime goals
Playoff assists
Playoff games played
Playoff penalty minutes
Playoff plus-minus
Playoff shots on goal
Playoff shooting percentage
Goaltenders
All-time leaders
Regular season wins
Regular season shutouts
Regular season goals against average
Regular season save percentage
Playoff wins
Playoff shutouts
Active leaders
Regular season wins
Regular season shutouts
Regular season goals against average
Regular season save percentage
Playoff wins
Playoff shutouts
Coaches
All-time leaders
Regular season games coached
Regular season coaching wins
Regular season coaching points percentage
Playoff games coached
Playoff coaching wins
Stanley Cups
Active leaders
Regular season games coached
Regular season coaching wins
Regular season coaching points percentage
Playoff games coached
Playoff coaching wins
Stanley Cups
See also
Notes and references

Skaters

The statistics listed include the 2010–11 NHL regular season and 2011 playoffs.

All-time leaders (skaters)

Active skaters (during 2010–11 NHL season) are listed in boldface.

Regular season points

Rank Name Team(s) GP Pts PPG
1 Wayne Gretzky EDM, LAK, STL, NYR 1487 2857 1.92
2 Mark Messier EDM, NYR, VAN, NYR 1756 1887 1.07
3 Gordie Howe DET, HFD 1767 1850 1.05
4 Ron Francis HFD, PIT, CAR, TOR 1731 1798 1.04
5 Marcel Dionne DET, LAK, NYR 1348 1771 1.31
6 Steve Yzerman DET 1514 1755 1.16
7 Mario Lemieux PIT 915 1723 1.88
8 Joe Sakic QUE/COL 1378 1641 1.19
9 Czechoslovakia Jaromir Jagr PIT, WSH, NYR, PHI 1273 1599 1.26
10 Phil Esposito CHI, BOS, NYR 1282 1590 1.24
11 Ray Bourque BOS, COL 1612 1579 0.98
12 Mark Recchi PIT, PHI, MTL, PHI, PIT, CAR, PIT, ATL, TBL, BOS 1652 1533 0.93
13 Paul Coffey EDM, PIT, LAK, DET, HFD, PHI, CHI, CAR, BOS 1409 1531 1.09
14 Slovakia Stan Mikita[1] CHI 1394 1467 1.05
15 Bryan Trottier[2] NYI, PIT 1279 1425 1.11
16 Adam Oates DET, STL, BOS, WSH, PHI, ANA, EDM 1337 1420 1.06
17 Doug Gilmour STL, CGY, TOR, NJD, CHI, BUF, MTL, TOR 1474 1414 0.96
18 Dale Hawerchuk WPG, BUF, STL, PHI 1188 1409 1.19
19 Finland Jari Kurri EDM, LAK, NYR, ANA, COL 1251 1398 1.12
20 Luc Robitaille LAK, PIT, NYR, DET, LAK 1431 1394 0.97
21 Brett Hull[3] CGY, STL, DAL, DET, PHX 1269 1391 1.10
22 United States Mike Modano MNS/DAL, DET 1499 1374 0.92
23 Johnny Bucyk DET, BOS 1540 1369 0.89
24 Brendan Shanahan NJD, STL, HFD, DET, NYR, NJD 1524 1354 0.89
25 Guy Lafleur MTL, NYR, QUE 1127 1353 1.20
26 Sweden Mats Sundin QUE, TOR, VAN 1346 1349 1.00
27 Finland Teemu Selanne WIN, ANA, SJS, COL, ANA 1259 1340 1.06
28 Dave Andreychuk BUF, TOR, NJD, BOS, COL, TBL 1639 1338 0.82
28 Denis Savard CHI, MTL, TBL 1196 1338 1.12
30 Mike Gartner WSH, MNS, NYR, TOR, PHX 1432 1335 0.93
31 Pierre Turgeon BUF, NYI, MTL, STL, DAL, COL 1294 1327 1.03
32 Gilbert Perreault BUF 1191 1326 1.11
33 Alex Delvecchio DET 1549 1281 0.83
34 Al MacInnis CGY, STL 1416 1274 0.90
35 Jean Ratelle NYR, BOS 1281 1267 0.99
36 Czechoslovakia Peter Stastny[4] QUE, NJD, STL 977 1239 1.27
37 United States Phil Housley BUF, WPG, STL, CGY, NJD, WSH, CHI, TOR 1495 1232 0.82
38 Norm Ullman DET, TOR 1410 1229 0.87
39 Jean Beliveau MTL 1125 1219 1.08
40 Larry Murphy LAK, WSH, MNS, PIT, TOR, DET 1615 1216 0.75
40 United States Jeremy Roenick CHI, PHX, PHI, LAK, PHX, SJS 1363 1216 0.89
42 Bobby Clarke PHI 1144 1210 1.06
43 Bernie Nicholls LAK, NYR, EDM, NJD, CHI, SJS 1127 1209 1.07
44 Vincent Damphousse TOR, EDM, MTL, SJS, COL 1378 1205 0.87
45 Dino Ciccarelli MNS, WSH, DET, TBL, FLA 1232 1200 0.97
46 Rod Brind'Amour STL, PHI, CAR 1484 1184 0.80
47 Soviet Union Sergei Fedorov DET, ANA, CBJ, WSH 1248 1179 0.94
48 Bobby Hull CHI, WPG, HFD 1063 1170 1.10
49 Michel Goulet QUE, CHI 1089 1152 1.06
50 Bernie Federko STL, DET 1000 1130 1.13
Regular season points per game
Minimum 500 points

Regular season goals

Regular season goals per game
Minimum 200 goals
  1. Mike Bossy, 0.762
  2. Cy Denneny, 0.756
  3. Mario Lemieux, 0.754
  4. Babe Dye, 0.742
  5. Soviet Union Alexander Ovechkin, 0.634
  6. Soviet Union Pavel Bure, 0.623
  7. Wayne Gretzky, 0.601
  8. Brett Hull,[3] 0.584
  9. Bobby Hull, 0.574
  10. Tim Kerr, 0.565
  11. Rick Martin, 0.561
  12. Phil Esposito, 0.559
  13. Maurice Richard, 0.556
  14. Cam Neely, 0.544
  15. Marcel Dionne, 0.542
  16. United States Pat LaFontaine, 0.541
  17. Soviet Union Ilya Kovalchuk, 0.526
  18. Sidney Crosby, 0.522
  19. Czechoslovakia Jaromir Jagr, 0.507
  20. Finland Teemu Selanne, 0.506
  21. Rick Vaive, 0.5034
  22. Michel Goulet, 0.5032
  23. Nels Stewart, 0.498
  24. Guy Lafleur, 0.497
  25. Mike Gartner, 0.494
Regular season powerplay goals

When a team is given a penalty for committing an infraction (such as tripping another player), the offending player must sit in the penalty box, and his team must play with one fewer player on the ice. The penalized team is said to be "short-handed", while the other team has a "powerplay". If a player scores while his team is on the powerplay, this is recorded as a powerplay goal.

Regular season short-handed goals

When a team is given a penalty for committing an infraction (such as tripping another player), the offending player must sit in the penalty box, and his team must play with one fewer player on the ice. The penalized team is said to be "short-handed", while the other team has a "powerplay". If a player scores while his team is short handed, this is recorded as a short-handed goal.

Regular season game-winning goals
Regular season overtime goals

If a game is tied after regulation time (which lasts three 20-minutes periods), there will be a period of "overtime" to decide the winner. The player who scores during this extra time is given the overtime goal. All overtime in the NHL is sudden death—meaning the first team to score is the winner—so the player who scores in overtime also has the game-winning goal.

Regular season assists

Regular season assists per game
Minimum 300 assists

Regular season games played

Regular season penalty minutes

A penalty is given to a player for committing an infraction during the game. The length of the penalty varies depending on the severity of the offence. The amount of penalty minutes recorded for statistical purposes are:

  • minor – 2 minutes
  • double minor – 4 minutes
  • major – 5 minutes
  • misconduct – 10 minutes
  • game misconduct – 10 minutes
  1. Tiger Williams, 3,966
  2. Dale Hunter, 3,565
  3. Tie Domi, 3,515
  4. Marty McSorley, 3,381
  5. Bob Probert, 3,300
  6. Rob Ray, 3,207
  7. Craig Berube, 3,149
  8. Tim Hunter, 3,146
  9. United States Chris Nilan, 3,043
  10. Rick Tocchet, 2,972
  11. Pat Verbeek, 2,905
  12. United States Chris Chelios, 2,891
  13. Dave Manson, 2,792
  14. Scott Stevens, 2,785
  15. United States Donald Brashear, 2,634
  16. Paraguay Willi Plett,[7] 2,572
  17. Gino Odjick, 2,567
  18. Matthew Barnaby, 2,562
  19. Gary Roberts, 2,560
  20. Joe Kocur, 2,519
  21. Ken Daneyko, 2,516
  22. Brendan Shanahan, 2,489
  23. Scott Mellanby, 2,479
  24. Basil McRae, 2,457
  25. Sweden Ulf Samuelsson, 2,453

Regular season plus-minus

Plus-minus is a statistic that indicates the relative goal differential when a player is on the ice. If the player is on the ice when his team scores even-strength or short-handed, he is given +1; if he is on the ice when the opposing team scores even-strength or short-handed, he is given -1.

Regular season shots on goal

Regular season shooting percentage

Shooting percentage is the percentage of shots on goal which result in a goal.

Minimum 800 shots
  1. Craig Simpson, 23.66 %
  2. Charlie Simmer, 22.34 %
  3. France Paul MacLean,[9] 21.41 %
  4. Mike Bossy, 21.18 %
  5. Yvon Lambert, 19.85 %
  6. Rick Middleton, 19.69 %
  7. Blaine Stoughton, 19.52 %
  8. Darryl Sutter, 19.42 %
  9. Rob Brown, 19.41 %
  10. Mike Ridley, 19.30 %
  11. Steve Vickers, 19.28 %
  12. Sweden Kent Nilsson, 19.21 %
  13. Tom McCarthy, 19.16 %
  14. Finland Jari Kurri, 19.13 %
  15. John Bucyk, 19.09 %
  16. Mario Lemieux, 18.99 %
  17. Czechoslovakia Peter Stastny,[4] 18.96 %
  18. Ray Ferraro, 18.85 %
  19. Mark Hunter, 18.783 %
  20. Alex Tanguay, 18.781 %

Playoff points

Playoff points per game
Minimum 50 points

Playoff goals

Playoff goals per game
Minimum 20 goals
Playoff powerplay goals

When a team is given a penalty for committing an infraction (such as tripping another player), the offending player must sit in the penalty box, and his team must play with one fewer player on the ice. The penalized team is said to be "short-handed", while the other team has a "powerplay". If a player scores while his team is on the powerplay, this is recorded as a powerplay goal.

Playoff short-handed goals

When a team is given a penalty for committing an infraction (such as tripping another player), the offending player must sit in the penalty box, and his team must play with one fewer player on the ice. The penalized team is said to be "short-handed", while the other team has a "powerplay". If a player scores while his team is short handed, this is recorded as a short-handed goal.

Playoff game-winning goals
Playoff overtime goals

If a game is tied after regulation time (which lasts three 20-minutes periods), there will be a period of "overtime" to decide the winner. The player who scores during this extra time is given the overtime goal. All overtime in the NHL is sudden death—meaning the first team to score is the winner—so the player who scores in overtime also has the game-winning goal.

Playoff assists

Playoff games played

Playoff penalty minutes

A penalty is given to a player for committing an infraction during the game. The length of the penalty varies depending on the severity of the offence. The amount of penalty minutes recorded for statistical purposes are:

  • minor – 2 minutes
  • double minor – 4 minutes
  • major – 5 minutes
  • misconduct – 10 minutes
  • game misconduct – 10 minutes

Playoff plus-minus

Plus-minus is a statistic that indicates the relative goal differential when a player is on the ice. If the player is on the ice when his team scores even-strength or short-handed, he is given +1; if he is on the ice when the opposing team scores even-strength or short-handed, he is given -1.

Playoff shots on goal

Playoff shooting percentage

Shooting percentage is the percentage of shots on goal which result in a goal.

Minimum 80 shots
  1. Craig Simpson, 33.64 %
  2. Ken Linseman, 23.21 %
  3. Tim Kerr, 20.33 %
  4. Bernie Federko, 20.20 %
  5. Martin St. Louis, 20.00 %
  6. Cam Neely, 19.59 %
  7. Finland Jari Kurri, 19.40 %
  8. Ray Ferraro, 19.27 %
  9. France Paul MacLean,[9] 19.10 %
  10. Mario Lemieux, 18.91 %
  11. Kevin Dineen, 18.85 %
  12. Czechoslovakia Peter Stastny,[4] 18.58 %
  13. Austria Thomas Vanek, 18.29 %
  14. Sweden Peter Forsberg, 18.13 %
  15. Rick Vaive, 17.83 %

Active leaders (skaters)

Regular season points (active)

Regular season points per game (active)
Minimum 500 points

Regular season goals (active)

Regular season goals per game (active)
Minimum 200 goals
Regular season powerplay goals (active)

When a team is given a penalty for committing an infraction (such as tripping another player), the offending player must sit in the penalty box, and his team must play with one fewer player on the ice. The penalized team is said to be "short-handed", while the other team has a "powerplay". If a player scores while his team is on the powerplay, this is recorded as a powerplay goal.

Regular season short-handed goals (active)

When a team is given a penalty for committing an infraction (such as tripping another player), the offending player must sit in the penalty box, and his team must play with one fewer player on the ice. The penalized team is said to be "short-handed", while the other team has a "powerplay". If a player scores while his team is short handed, this is recorded as a short-handed goal.

Regular season game-winning goals (active)
Regular season overtime goals (active)

If a game is tied after regulation time (which lasts three 20-minutes periods), there will be a period of "overtime" to decide the winner. The player who scores during this extra time is given the overtime goal. All overtime in the NHL is sudden death—meaning the first team to score is the winner—so the player who scores in overtime also has the game-winning goal.

Regular season assists (active)

Regular season assists per game (active)
Minimum 300 assists

Regular season games played (active)

Regular season penalty minutes (active)

A penalty is given to a player for committing an infraction during the game. The length of the penalty varies depending on the severity of the offence. The amount of penalty minutes recorded for statistical purposes are:

  • minor – 2 minutes
  • double minor – 4 minutes
  • major – 5 minutes
  • misconduct – 10 minutes
  • game misconduct – 10 minutes

Regular season plus-minus (active)

Plus-minus is a statistic that indicates the relative goal differential when a player is on the ice. If the player is on the ice when his team scores even-strength or short-handed, he is given +1; if he is on the ice when the opposing team scores even-strength or short-handed, he is given -1.

Regular season shots on goal (active)

Regular season shooting percentage (active)

Shooting percentage is the percentage of shots on goal which result in a goal.

Minimum 800 shots
  1. Alex Tanguay, 18.78 %
  2. Andrew Brunette, 17.77 %
  3. United States Mark Parrish, 17.32 %
  4. Sweden Tomas Holmstrom, 16.67 %
  5. Brenden Morrow, 15.66 %
  6. Austria Thomas Vanek, 15.55 %
  7. Finland Teemu Selanne, 15.45 %
  8. Sidney Crosby, 15.38 %
  9. Daniel Briere, 15.30 %
  10. West Germany Dany Heatley,[11] 15.29 %

Playoff points (active)

Playoff goals (active)

Playoff goals per game (active)
Minimum 20 goals
  1. Soviet Union Alex Ovechkin, 0.676
  2. Martin St. Louis, 0.524
  3. Jarome Iginla, 0.518
  4. Sidney Crosby, 0.484
  5. Sweden Henrik Zetterberg, 0.471
  6. Soviet Union Evgeni Malkin, 0.468
  7. Sweden Johan Franzen, 0.466
  8. Czechoslovakia Jaromir Jagr, 0.456
  9. United States Patrick Kane, 0.444
  10. Daniel Briere, 0.433
Playoff powerplay goals (active)

When a team is given a penalty for committing an infraction (such as tripping another player), the offending player must sit in the penalty box, and his team must play with one fewer player on the ice. The penalized team is said to be "short-handed", while the other team has a "powerplay". If a player scores while his team is on the powerplay, this is recorded as a powerplay goal.

Playoff short-handed goals (active)

When a team is given a penalty for committing an infraction (such as tripping another player), the offending player must sit in the penalty box, and his team must play with one fewer player on the ice. The penalized team is said to be "short-handed", while the other team has a "powerplay". If a player scores while his team is short handed, this is recorded as a short-handed goal.

Playoff game-winning goals (active)
Playoff overtime goals (active)

If a game is tied after regulation time (which lasts three 20-minutes periods), there will be a period of "overtime" to decide the winner. The player who scores during this extra time is given the overtime goal. All overtime in the NHL is sudden death—meaning the first team to score is the winner—so the player who scores in overtime also has the game-winning goal.

Playoff assists (active)

Playoff games played (active)

Playoff penalty minutes (active)

A penalty is given to a player for committing an infraction during the game. The length of the penalty varies depending on the severity of the offence. The amount of penalty minutes recorded for statistical purposes are:

  • minor – 2 minutes
  • double minor – 4 minutes
  • major – 5 minutes
  • misconduct – 10 minutes
  • game misconduct – 10 minutes

Playoff plus-minus (active)

Plus-minus is a statistic that indicates the relative goal differential when a player is on the ice. If the player is on the ice when his team scores even-strength or short-handed, he is given +1; if he is on the ice when the opposing team scores even-strength or short-handed, he is given -1.

Playoff shots on goal (active)

Playoff shooting percentage (active)

Shooting percentage is the percentage of shots on goal which result in a goal.

Minimum 80 shots
  1. Martin St. Louis, 20.00 %
  2. Austria Thomas Vanek, 18.29 %
  3. Michael Cammalleri, 17.00 %
  4. United States Patrick Kane, 16.67 %
  5. Czechoslovakia David Krejci, 16.52 %
  6. United States Dustin Byfuglien, 16.47 %
  7. Patrick Marleau, 15.81 %
  8. Sweden Tomas Holmstrom, 15.68 %
  9. Scott Hartnell, 16.13 %
  10. Maxime Talbot, 15.56 %
  11. Jarome Iginla, 15.47 %

Goaltenders

The statistics listed include the 2010–11 NHL regular season and 2011 playoffs.

All-time leaders (goaltenders)

Active goaltenders (during 2010–11 NHL season) are listed in boldface.

Regular season wins

Regular season shutouts

A goaltender achieves a shutout when he does not allow a goal against him, and plays the full game.

Regular season goals against average

Goals against average is the average number of goals a goaltender allows over a 60 minute period (the regulation length of a game). It is calculated by multiplying the goals against by 60 minutes, then dividing by the total minutes played.

Minimum 250 games played

Regular season save percentage

Save percentage is the percentage of shots on goal that a goaltender stops. It is calculated by dividing the number of saves by the number of shots on goal.

Minimum 250 games played

Playoff wins

Playoff shutouts

A goaltender achieves a shutout when he does not allow a goal against him, and plays the full game.

Active leaders (goaltenders)

Regular season wins (active)

Regular season shutouts (active)

A goaltender achieves a shutout when he does not allow a goal against him, and plays the full game.

Regular season goals against average (active)

Goals against average is the average number of goals a goaltender allows over a 60 minute period (the regulation length of a game). It is calculated by multiplying the goals against by 60 minutes, then dividing by the total minutes played.

Minimum 250 games played

Regular season save percentage (active)

Save percentage is the percentage of shots on goal that a goaltender stops. It is calculated by dividing the number of saves by the number of shots on goal.

Minimum 250 games played

Playoff wins (active)

Playoff shutouts (active)

A goaltender achieves a shutout when he does not allow a goal against him, and plays the full game.

Coaches

The statistics listed include the 2010–11 NHL regular season and 2011 playoffs.

All-time leaders (coaches)

Active coaches (during 2010–11 NHL season) are listed in boldface.

Regular season games coached

  1. Scotty Bowman, 2,141
  2. Al Arbour, 1,607
  3. Dick Irvin, Sr., 1,449
  4. Pat Quinn, 1,400
  5. Mike Keenan, 1,386
  6. Ron Wilson,[15] 1,337
  7. Jacques Lemaire, 1,262
    Jacques Martin, 1,262
  8. Bryan Murray, 1,239
  9. Marc Crawford, 1,151
  10. Billy Reay, 1,102
  11. Joel Quenneville, 1,081
  12. Lindy Ruff, 1,066
  13. Paul Maurice, 1,059
  14. Ken Hitchcock, 1,041
  15. Brian Sutter, 1,028
  16. Pat Burns, 1,019
  17. Jacques Demers, 1,007
  18. Roger Neilson, 1,000
  19. Barry Trotz, 984

Regular season coaching wins

  1. Scotty Bowman, 1,244
  2. Al Arbour, 782
  3. Dick Irvin, Sr., 692
  4. Pat Quinn, 684
  5. Mike Keenan, 672
  6. Bryan Murray, 620
  7. Ron Wilson,[15] 619
  8. Jacques Lemaire, 617
  9. Jacques Martin, 600
  10. Joel Quenneville, 579
  11. Marc Crawford, 549
  12. Billy Reay, 542
  13. Ken Hitchcock, 533
  14. Lindy Ruff, 526
  15. Pat Burns, 501
  16. Toe Blake, 500
  17. Glen Sather, 497
  18. Terry Murray, 486
  19. Roger Neilson, 460
  20. Barry Trotz, 455

Regular season coaching points percentage

Points percentage is determined by the number of points a team earns (equal to the number of ties and overtime losses, plus twice the number of wins) divided by the total possible points (equal to twice the number of games).

Minimum 200 games coached

Playoff games coached

Playoff coaching wins

Playoff coaching win percentage

Minimum 25 games coached

Stanley Cups

  1. Scotty Bowman, 9
  2. Toe Blake, 8
  3. Hap Day, 5
  4. Al Arbour, 4
    Punch Imlach, 4
    Dick Irvin, Sr., 4
    Glen Sather, 4
  5. Jack Adams, 3
    Pete Green, 3
    Tommy Ivan, 3

Active leaders (coaches)

Regular season games coached (active)

Regular season coaching wins (active)

Regular season coaching points percentage (active)

Points percentage is determined by the number of points a team earns (equal to the number of ties and overtime losses, plus twice the number of games) divided by the total possible points (equal to twice the number of games).

Minimum 200 games coached

Playoff games coached (active)

Playoff coaching wins (active)

Stanley Cups (active)

  1. Mike Babcock, 1
    United States Dan Bylsma, 1
    Randy Carlyle, 1
    Marc Crawford, 1
    Claude Julien, 1
    United States Peter Laviolette, 1
    Joel Quenneville, 1
    United States John Tortorella, 1

See also

Notes and references

  1. ^ a b c Stan Mikita was born in the World War II era Slovak Republic, in what is now Slovakia. His family moved to Canada when he was young, and he played internationally for Canada.
  2. ^ a b c d e f g h i j Bryan Trottier was born in Canada, and represented both Canada and the United States internationally.
  3. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m Brett Hull was born in Canada but played internationally for the United States.
  4. ^ a b c d e f g Peter Stastny was born in Czechoslovakia, in what is now Slovakia. He played internationally with three countries (in order): Czechoslovakia, Canada, and Slovakia.
  5. ^ a b c Peter Bondra was born in the Ukrainian SSR of the former Soviet Union. However, his family moved to their native Czechoslovakia (now Slovakia) when he was young, and he represented Slovakia internationally.
  6. ^ a b c Steve Thomas was born in England, United Kingdom but represented Canada internationally.
  7. ^ a b Willi Plett was born in Paraguay but moved to Canada as a boy.
  8. ^ a b Mark Howe was born in the United States, and represented both the U.S. and Canada internationally.
  9. ^ a b Paul MacLean was born in France but raised in Canada. He represented Canada internationally.
  10. ^ Steve Smith was born in Scotland, United Kingdom but represented Canada internationally.
  11. ^ a b c d e f Dany Heatley was born in West Germany (now Germany) to Canadian parents, and represents Canada internationally.
  12. ^ Olaf Kölzig was born in South Africa, but represents Germany internationally.
  13. ^ a b c d e f g h i Evgeni Nabokov was born in the Kazakh SSR of the former Soviet Union, and represented Kazakhstan early in his career. However, he now represents Russia internationally.
  14. ^ Chuck Gardiner was born in Scotland, United Kingdom, but came to Canada at a young age.
  15. ^ a b c d e f Ron Wilson was born in Canada but coaches internationally for United States.
  • Virtually all players on this list from Russia, Kazakhstan, or the Ukraine were actually born in the Soviet Union—in the Russian SFSR, Kazakh SSR, and Ukrainian SSR, respectively. The Soviet Union officially dissolved at the end of 1991. No players born strictly in Russia, Kazakhstan, or the Ukraine have yet entered the NHL.
  • Virtually all players on this list from the Czech Republic or Slovakia were actually born in Czechoslovakia. Czechoslovakia officially dissolved at the end of 1992. No players born strictly in the Czech Republic or Slovakia have yet entered the NHL.


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  • List of NHL franchise post-season droughts — For an explanation of the NHL season and post season, see Season structure of the NHL. These are lists of active and all time National Hockey League (NHL) franchise post season appearance, post season series win, Stanley Cup Final and Stanley Cup …   Wikipedia

  • List of NHL franchise post-season appearance streaks — For an explanation of the NHL season and post season, see Season structure of the NHL. These are lists of active and all time National Hockey League (NHL) franchise post season appearance, post season series win, Stanley Cup Final and Stanley Cup …   Wikipedia

  • List of NHL players — This list of National Hockey League (NHL) players is divided into the following lists: Contents 1 By name 2 By specific groups 3 By NHL teams 3.1 Current …   Wikipedia

  • List of NHL seasons — This is a list of seasons of the National Hockey League (NHL), a professional ice hockey league, since its inception in 1917. The list also includes the seasons of the National Hockey Association (NHA), the predecessor organization of the NHL,… …   Wikipedia

  • List of NHL head coaches — This is a list of National Hockey League head coaches. All statistics include the 2009–10 season. Coaches of current teams Note: G = games coached, W = wins, L = losses, T = ties (no longer counted), OTL = overtime loss, P% = points percentage,… …   Wikipedia