Manzanita Band of Diegueno Mission Indians


Manzanita Band of Diegueno Mission Indians
Manzanita Band
of Diegueno Mission Indians
Total population
67 enrolled members[1]
Regions with significant populations
United States United States California (California)
Languages

Kumeyaay,[2][3] English

Religion

Traditional tribal religion,
Christianity (Roman Catholicism)[4]

Related ethnic groups

other Kumeyaay tribes, Cocopa,
Quechan, Paipai, and Kiliwa

The Manzanita Band of Diegueno Mission Indians of the Manzanita Reservation is a federally recognized tribe of Kumeyaay Indians,[4] who are sometimes known as Mission Indians.

Contents

Reservation

The Manzanita Reservation is a federal Indian reservation located in southeastern San Diego County, California, near Boulevard, within ten miles (16 km) north of the US-Mexico Border. The reservation is 3,579 acres (14.48 km2) large with a population of approximately 69.[1] It was established in 1893.[5] In 1973, 6 out of 69 enrolled members lived on the reservation.[2]

Government

The Manzanita Band is headquartered in Boulevard. They are governed by a democratically elected tribal council. Leroy J. Elliott is their current tribal chairperson.[6]

Notes

  1. ^ a b "California Indians and Their Reservations: P." SDSU Library and Information Access. (retrieved 31 May 2010)
  2. ^ a b Shipek, 612
  3. ^ Eargle, 118-9
  4. ^ a b Pritzker, 147
  5. ^ Pritzker, 146
  6. ^ "Tribal Governments by Area." National Congress of American Indians. (retrieved 31 May 2010)

References

  • Eargle, Jr., Dolan H. California Indian Country: The Land and the People. San Francisco: Tree Company Press, 1992. ISBN 0-937401-20-X.
  • Pritzker, Barry M. A Native American Encyclopedia: History, Culture, and Peoples. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2000. ISBN 978-0195138771.
  • Shipek, Florence C. "History of Southern California Mission Indians." Handbook of North American Indians. Volume ed. Heizer, Robert F. Washington, DC: Smithsonian Institution, 1978. 610-618. ISBN 0-87474-187-4.

External links


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