Don't Ask, Don't Tell Repeal Act of 2010


Don't Ask, Don't Tell Repeal Act of 2010
Don't Ask, Don't Tell Repeal Act of 2010
Great Seal of the United States.
Enacted by the 111th United States Congress
Citations
Codification
Legislative history
Major amendments
Relevant Supreme Court cases
None

The Don't Ask, Don't Tell Repeal Act of 2010 (H.R. 2965, S. 4023) is a landmark federal statute that establishes a legal process for ending the Don't ask, don't tell (DADT) policy (10 U.S.C. § 654), which since 1993 prevented openly gay and lesbian people from serving in the United States Armed Forces.

The Act did not immediately repeal the "Don't ask, don't tell" policy. According to the Congressional Research Service, the Act:[3]

Provides for repeal of the current Department of Defense (DOD) policy concerning homosexuality in the Armed Forces, to be effective 60 days after the Secretary of Defense has received DOD's comprehensive review on the implementation of such repeal, and the President, Secretary, and Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff (JCS) certify to the congressional defense committees that they have considered the report and proposed plan of action, that DOD has prepared the necessary policies and regulations to exercise the discretion provided by such repeal, and that implementation of such policies and regulations is consistent with the standards of military readiness and effectiveness, unit cohesion, and military recruiting and retention.

The Act did not replace DADT with a ban on discrimination on the basis of sexual orientation in the military, as provided for in the proposed Military Readiness Enhancement Act.

President Barack Obama, Defense Secretary Leon Panetta, and Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff Admiral Mike Mullen provided the certification required by the Act to Congress that on July 22, 2011. Implementation of repeal was completed 60 days later, so that DADT was no longer policy as of September 20, 2011.

Contents

Legislative history

Originally the Democratic leadership in both the House and Senate intended to end the "don't ask, don't tell" policy with an amendment to the Defense Authorization bill. However, the defense bill failed to clear a Republican filibuster in the Senate due to objections of the procedures from which the bill was being debated. In response, Senator Joe Lieberman introduced the stand-alone repeal bill in the Senate, and Congressman Patrick Murphy introduced the same bill in the House.

The Act was passed by the House of Representatives on December 15, 2010, with a vote of 250 to 175, and by the Senate on December 18, 2010, with a vote of 65 to 31.[4] President Barack Obama signed the bill into law on December 22, 2010.[1][2]

Senate roll call

The Senate passed S.4023 65-31 with all Democrats (except for one abstention) and 8 Republicans in support.
  Both yes
  One yes, one didn't vote
  One yes, one no
  One no, one didn't vote
  Both no
State Senator Party Vote on
Cloture[5]
Vote on
Repeal[6]
Hawaii Akaka, DanielDaniel Akaka Democratic Green tickY Aye Green tickY Aye
Tennessee Alexander, LamarLamar Alexander Republican Red XN No Red XN No
Wyoming Barrasso, JohnJohn Barrasso Republican Red XN No Red XN No
Montana Baucus, MaxMax Baucus Democratic Green tickY Aye Green tickY Aye
Indiana Bayh, EvanEvan Bayh Democratic Green tickY Aye Green tickY Aye
Alaska Begich, MarkMark Begich Democratic Green tickY Aye Green tickY Aye
Colorado Bennet, MichaelMichael Bennet Democratic Green tickY Aye Green tickY Aye
Utah Bennett, RobertRobert Bennett Republican Red XN No Red XN No
New Mexico Bingaman, JeffJeff Bingaman Democratic Green tickY Aye Green tickY Aye
Missouri Bond, KitKit Bond Republican Red XN No Red XN No
California Boxer, BarbaraBarbara Boxer Democratic Green tickY Aye Green tickY Aye
Ohio Brown, SherrodSherrod Brown Democratic Green tickY Aye Green tickY Aye
Massachusetts Brown, ScottScott Brown Republican Green tickY Aye Green tickY Aye
Kansas Brownback, SamSam Brownback Republican Red XN No Red XN No
Kentucky Bunning, JimJim Bunning Republican Did not vote Did not vote
North Carolina Burr, RichardRichard Burr Republican Red XN No Green tickY Aye
Washington Cantwell, MariaMaria Cantwell Democratic Green tickY Aye Green tickY Aye
Maryland Cardin, BenBen Cardin Democratic Green tickY Aye Green tickY Aye
Delaware Carper, TomTom Carper Democratic Green tickY Aye Green tickY Aye
Pennsylvania Casey, Jr., BobBob Casey, Jr. Democratic Green tickY Aye Green tickY Aye
Georgia Chambliss, SaxbySaxby Chambliss Republican Red XN No Red XN No
Oklahoma Coburn, TomTom Coburn Republican Red XN No Red XN No
Mississippi Cochran, ThadThad Cochran Republican Red XN No Red XN No
Maine Collins, SusanSusan Collins Republican Green tickY Aye Green tickY Aye
North Dakota Conrad, KentKent Conrad Democratic Green tickY Aye Green tickY Aye
Delaware Coons, ChrisChris Coons Democratic Green tickY Aye Green tickY Aye
Tennessee Corker, BobBob Corker Republican Red XN No Red XN No
Texas Cornyn, JohnJohn Cornyn Republican Red XN No Red XN No
Idaho Crapo, MikeMike Crapo Republican Red XN No Red XN No
South Carolina DeMint, JimJim DeMint Republican Red XN No Red XN No
Connecticut Dodd, ChristopherChristopher Dodd Democratic Green tickY Aye Green tickY Aye
North Dakota Dorgan, ByronByron Dorgan Democratic Green tickY Aye Green tickY Aye
Illinois Durbin, DickDick Durbin Democratic Green tickY Aye Green tickY Aye
Nevada Ensign, JohnJohn Ensign Republican Red XN No Green tickY Aye
Wyoming Enzi, MikeMike Enzi Republican Red XN No Red XN No
Wisconsin Feingold, RussRuss Feingold Democratic Green tickY Aye Green tickY Aye
California Feinstein, DianneDianne Feinstein Democratic Green tickY Aye Green tickY Aye
Minnesota Franken, AlAl Franken Democratic Green tickY Aye Green tickY Aye
New York Gillibrand, KirstenKirsten Gillibrand Democratic Green tickY Aye Green tickY Aye
South Carolina Graham, LindseyLindsey Graham Republican Red XN No Red XN No
Iowa Grassley, ChuckChuck Grassley Republican Red XN No Red XN No
New Hampshire Gregg, JuddJudd Gregg Republican Did not vote Did not vote
North Carolina Hagan, KayKay Hagan Democratic Green tickY Aye Green tickY Aye
Iowa Harkin, TomTom Harkin Democratic Green tickY Aye Green tickY Aye
Utah Hatch, OrrinOrrin Hatch Republican Did not vote Did not vote
Texas Hutchison, Kay BaileyKay Bailey Hutchison Republican Red XN No Red XN No
Oklahoma Inhofe, JimJim Inhofe Republican Red XN No Red XN No
Hawaii Inouye, DanielDaniel Inouye Democratic Green tickY Aye Green tickY Aye
Georgia Isakson, JohnnyJohnny Isakson Republican Red XN No Red XN No
Nebraska Johanns, MikeMike Johanns Republican Red XN No Red XN No
South Dakota Johnson, TimTim Johnson Democratic Green tickY Aye Green tickY Aye
Massachusetts Kerry, JohnJohn Kerry Democratic Green tickY Aye Green tickY Aye
Illinois Kirk, MarkMark Kirk Republican Green tickY Aye Green tickY Aye
Minnesota Klobuchar, AmyAmy Klobuchar Democratic Green tickY Aye Green tickY Aye
Wisconsin Kohl, HerbHerb Kohl Democratic Green tickY Aye Green tickY Aye
Arizona Kyl, JonJon Kyl Republican Red XN No Red XN No
Louisiana Landrieu, MaryMary Landrieu Democratic Green tickY Aye Green tickY Aye
New Jersey Lautenberg, FrankFrank Lautenberg Democratic Green tickY Aye Green tickY Aye
Vermont Leahy, PatrickPatrick Leahy Democratic Green tickY Aye Green tickY Aye
Florida LeMieux, GeorgeGeorge LeMieux Republican Red XN No Red XN No
Michigan Levin, CarlCarl Levin Democratic Green tickY Aye Green tickY Aye
Connecticut Lieberman, JoeJoe Lieberman Independent Green tickY Aye Green tickY Aye
Arkansas Lincoln, BlancheBlanche Lincoln Democratic Green tickY Aye Green tickY Aye
Indiana Lugar, RichardRichard Lugar Republican Red XN No Red XN No
West Virginia Manchin, JoeJoe Manchin Democratic Did not vote Did not vote
Arizona McCain, JohnJohn McCain Republican Red XN No Red XN No
Missouri McCaskill, ClaireClaire McCaskill Democratic Green tickY Aye Green tickY Aye
Kentucky McConnell, MitchMitch McConnell Republican Red XN No Red XN No
New Jersey Menendez, BobBob Menendez Democratic Green tickY Aye Green tickY Aye
Oregon Merkley, JeffJeff Merkley Democratic Green tickY Aye Green tickY Aye
Maryland Mikulski, BarbaraBarbara Mikulski Democratic Green tickY Aye Green tickY Aye
Alaska Murkowski, LisaLisa Murkowski Republican Green tickY Aye Green tickY Aye
Washington Murray, PattyPatty Murray Democratic Green tickY Aye Green tickY Aye
Nebraska Nelson, BenBen Nelson Democratic Green tickY Aye Green tickY Aye
Florida Nelson, BillBill Nelson Democratic Green tickY Aye Green tickY Aye
Arkansas Pryor, MarkMark Pryor Democratic Green tickY Aye Green tickY Aye
Rhode Island Reed, JackJack Reed Democratic Green tickY Aye Green tickY Aye
Nevada Reid, HarryHarry Reid Democratic Green tickY Aye Green tickY Aye
Idaho Risch, JimJim Risch Republican Red XN No Red XN No
Kansas Roberts, PatPat Roberts Republican Red XN No Red XN No
West Virginia Rockefeller, JayJay Rockefeller Democratic Green tickY Aye Green tickY Aye
Vermont Sanders, BernieBernie Sanders Independent Green tickY Aye Green tickY Aye
New York Schumer, ChuckChuck Schumer Democratic Green tickY Aye Green tickY Aye
Alabama Sessions, JeffJeff Sessions Republican Red XN No Red XN No
New Hampshire Shaheen, JeanneJeanne Shaheen Democratic Green tickY Aye Green tickY Aye
Alabama Shelby, RichardRichard Shelby Republican Red XN No Red XN No
Maine Snowe, OlympiaOlympia Snowe Republican Green tickY Aye Green tickY Aye
Pennsylvania Specter, ArlenArlen Specter Democratic Green tickY Aye Green tickY Aye
Michigan Stabenow, DebbieDebbie Stabenow Democratic Green tickY Aye Green tickY Aye
Montana Tester, JonJon Tester Democratic Green tickY Aye Green tickY Aye
South Dakota Thune, JohnJohn Thune Republican Red XN No Red XN No
Colorado Udall, MarkMark Udall Democratic Green tickY Aye Green tickY Aye
New Mexico Udall, TomTom Udall Democratic Green tickY Aye Green tickY Aye
Louisiana Vitter, DavidDavid Vitter Republican Red XN No Red XN No
Ohio Voinovich, GeorgeGeorge Voinovich Republican Green tickY Aye Green tickY Aye
Virginia Warner, MarkMark Warner Democratic Green tickY Aye Green tickY Aye
Virginia Webb, JimJim Webb Democratic Green tickY Aye Green tickY Aye
Rhode Island Whitehouse, SheldonSheldon Whitehouse Democratic Green tickY Aye Green tickY Aye
Mississippi Wicker, RogerRoger Wicker Republican Red XN No Red XN No
Oregon Wyden, RonRon Wyden Democratic Green tickY Aye Green tickY Aye

Implementation

President Obama signs the repeal of DADT into law.

Following the signing of the bill into law by U.S. President Barack Obama, the Department of Defense will commission a committee, led by Clifford Stanley, which will itself commission a comprehensive review of current policies, the repeal and whether the newer status quo will be consistent with the goals of, in the words of Robert Gates, "military readiness, military effectiveness, unit cohesion, and recruiting and retention of the Armed Forces."[7] The reception of the review by Gates, Adm. Mike Mullen and President Obama will begin the 60-day waiting period for the Department of Defense, after which the detailed reforms will be incrementally implemented through a potential variety of initiatives in a top-down direction.

It is not known if ongoing or future discharges of openly gay or bisexual service members will cease upon Obama's signature, after the 60-day period following the reception of the comprehensive review, or at some later point. The law is expected, by the Department of Defense and supportive legislators, to result in full implementation within the military structure by the end of 2011.

It is also not known exactly how Section 925 of the United States Code (also known as Article 125 of the Uniform Code of Military Justice)—the ban on sodomy among service members—will be affected by the repeal of Section 654. Because Section 925 is considered a sodomy law which is not entirely subject to the civilian-applicable Supreme Court ruling against sodomy laws in Lawrence v. Texas, 925 can still technically be applied in a prosecutorial setting against service members accused of same-sex sexual intercourse, even though the section does not explicitly mention same-sex relations in its letter. The repeal of 654, which explicitly refers to a prohibition against homosexual and bisexual service members and was reformed by the 1993 congressional law, will likely open the possibility for future military-applicable judicial proceedings on the legality of 925. Analysts, such as David Rittgers of the Cato Institute, have called for the harmonization of Section 925 in regards to any sexual behavior which is perceived as disturbing the discipline and good order of the armed forces.[8] In addition, the report by the Pentagon on the results of the survey included a recommendation for the repeal of Article 125 in order to accommodate "consensual sodomy".[9]

2011 rollout

On January 28, 2011, the Pentagon rolled out a more definitive plan for implementation of the integration of openly LGB military personnel. It calls for a three-month period of training, to begin in Q3 2011, for all personnel, describing three mandatory levels of training for troops, commanders, administrators, recruiters and others:

  1. The first level of training involves requiring administrators and other leaders to answer detailed questions about the new policy.
  2. The second level requires senior officers to enforce the policy and observe for any feelings of unease among servicemembers.
  3. The third level consists of the general training of all troops, which is expected to be the most difficult portion due to the wide geographic distribution of troops.

After the training period is completed, the president and his military advisors must sign to a certification which confirms the ability of the military to accept the integration of openly-LGBT personnel. Sixty days after the certification is signed, the DADT Repeal Act will take effect as law. [10]

President Obama, Defense Secretary Leon Panetta, and Joint Chiefs of Staff Chairman Adm. Mike Mullen sent Congress the required certification on July 22, 2011. Full implementation of the repeal occurred on September 20, 2011, 60 days later.

Refusal of compensation

On the same day as the roll-out of the plan for DADT repeal training, the Department of Defense issued a memo stating that it would not offer any sort of compensation, including separation pay, for those discharged under DADT. As of December 2010, those discharged under the charge of homosexuality are due half of the separation pay due to other honorably discharged servicemembers.[11] The American Civil Liberties Union said the memo was linked to Collins v. United States, a case it filed against the DoD in November 2010 seeking full compensation for those discharged under the policy.[12]

References

  1. ^ a b Wilgoren, Debbi; Backon, Perry Jr. (2010-12-22). "Obama to sign DADT repeal before big, emotional crowd". Washington Post. http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2010/12/22/AR2010122201888.html. Retrieved 2010-12-22. 
  2. ^ a b "Obama signs bill repealing 'don't ask, don't tell' policy". Associated Press. Los Angeles Times. 2010-12-22. http://www.latimes.com/news/nationworld/nation/la-naw-dont-ask-repeal-20101222,0,4220844.story. Retrieved 2010-12-22. 
  3. ^ "H.R.2965 - Dont Ask, Dont Tell Repeal Act of 2010". OpenCongress.org. http://www.opencongress.org/bill/111-h2965/show. 
  4. ^ Carl Hulse (December 18, 2010). "Senate Repeals ‘Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell’". New York Times. http://www.nytimes.com/2010/12/19/us/politics/19cong.html?hp. 
  5. ^ Roll call vote 279, via Senate.gov
  6. ^ Roll call vote 281, via Senate.gov
  7. ^ Robert Gates (December 18, 2010). "News Release". United States Department of Defense. http://www.defense.gov/releases/release.aspx?releaseid=14154. 
  8. ^ David Rittgers (December 17, 2010). "House Bill Repeals DADT the Right Way". Cato @ Liberty, Cato Institute. http://www.cato-at-liberty.org/house-bill-repeals-dadt-the-right-way/. 
  9. ^ Johnson, Jeh Charles; Ham, Carter F.; Biscone, Gregory A.; Oostburg Sanz, Paul L.; Ferguson III, Mark E.; Benning, Scott A.; Ginsberg, Daniel B.; Zilmer, Richard C. et al. (November 30, 2010) (PDF), Report of the Comprehensive Review of the Issues Associated with a Repeal of “Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell”, Department of Defense, p. 139, http://www.defense.gov/home/features/2010/0610_gatesdadt/DADTReport_FINAL_20101130(secure-hires).pdf, retrieved 2010-12-22, "Article 125 of the UCMJ treats all acts of sodomy, heterosexual, homosexual, consensual, or otherwise, as punishable conduct. In Lawrence v. Texas, the Supreme Court held that private consensual sodomy between adults cannot be considered a crime. The U.S. Court of Appeals for the Armed Forces reached a similar conclusion in the military context in the case United States v. Marcum. In light of these decisions, we recommend that Article 125 be repealed or amended to the extent it prohibits consensual sodomy between adults, regardless of sexual orientation. The other prohibitions considered punishable under Article 125, including forcible sodomy, sodomy with minors and sodomy that is demonstrated to be 'service discrediting' (e.g., in public or between a superior and subordinate), should remain on the books." 
  10. ^ LOLITA C. BALDOR AND PAULINE JELINEK (Wednesday, January 26, 2011; 5:51 PM). "Pentagon to outline training for gay ban repeal". Associated Press via Washington Post. http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2011/01/26/AR2011012605711.html. 
  11. ^ "Defense Department Says It Will Deny Full Separation Pay For Gay And Lesbian Service Members Honorably Discharged Under “Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell”". American Civil Liberties Union. January 29, 2011. http://www.aclu.org/lgbt-rights/defense-department-says-it-will-deny-full-separation-pay-gay-and-lesbian-service-members. 
  12. ^ "Collins v. United States - Class Action for Military Separation Pay". American Civil Liberties Union. November 10, 2010. http://www.aclu.org/lgbt-rights/collins-v-united-states-class-action-military-separation-pay. 

External links



Wikimedia Foundation. 2010.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Don't ask, don't tell (disambiguation) — Don t ask, don t tell is the common name for the early 1990s United States military policy barring those who are openly gay, lesbian, or bisexual from military service. Don t Ask, Don t Tell or DADT may also refer to: Don t Ask, Don t Tell… …   Wikipedia

  • Don't ask, don't tell — DADT redirects here. For the television syndication company, see Disney ABC Domestic Television. For other uses, see Don t ask, don t tell (disambiguation) …   Wikipedia

  • Don’t ask, don’t tell — Der Comic erläutert die bisher armeeintern gültigen Verhaltensweisen “Don’t ask, don’t tell” (DADT, zu deutsch etwa „Frag nicht, sag nicht(s)“) war eine wehrrechtliche Praxis, die den Status von Homosexuellen in den Streitkräften der… …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • Military Readiness Enhancement Act — Part of a series on Lesbian …   Wikipedia

  • December 2010 — was the twelfth month of that year. It began on a Wednesday and ended after 31 days on a Friday. Portal:Current events This is an archived version of Wikipedia s Current events Portal from December 2010 …   Wikipedia

  • DREAM Act — The DREAM Act (acronym for Development, Relief and Education for Alien Minors) is an American legislative proposal first introduced in the Senate on August 1, 2001[1] and most recently reintroduced there on May 11, 2011. This bill would provide… …   Wikipedia

  • United States Senate special election in Massachusetts, 2010 — 2006 ← January 19, 2010 (2010 01 1 …   Wikipedia

  • USA PATRIOT Act — Full title Uniting and Strengthening America by Providing Appropriate Tools Required to Intercept and Obstruct Terrorism Act of 2001 Acronym USA PATRIOT Act, also Patriot Act Enacted by the 107th United States Congress …   Wikipedia

  • Matthew Shepard and James Byrd, Jr. Hate Crimes Prevention Act — Part of a series on Discrimination General forms …   Wikipedia

  • Presidency of Barack Obama — 44th President of the United States Incumbent Assumed office January …   Wikipedia