Director of Administration and Management (DoD)


Director of Administration and Management (DoD)

The Director of Administration and Management, or DA&M, is a position within the Office of the Secretary of Defense (OSD) at the Department of Defense. As the principal staff assistant and advisor to the Secretary and Deputy Secretary of Defense concerning organizational and administrative management matters, the DA&M is responsible for: developing and maintaining organizational charters and overseeing assigned programs such as DoD Committee Management, DoD Headquarters Management, the OSD Historical Program, the DoD Freedom of Information Act Program, the DoD Privacy Program, the DoD Civil Liberties program, the OSD Internal Management Control Program, and OSD Information Technology/CIO programs. Additionally, the DA&M performs management and oversight responsibilities for the Pentagon Force Protection Agency and the Washington Headquarters Services, a 1,300 employee, $1.3 billion field activity.[1]

Contents

Responsibilities

The DA&M has three principal responsibilities: to advise the Secretary and DoD senior leaders team on organizational and management matters of institutional importance; to oversee and provide a range of administrative, logistical, facilities, and technology support to the Pentagon Reservation - the headquarters of the U.S. Defense establishment and a highly visible symbol of U.S. military power - and DoD-leased facilities in the National Capital Region (NCR); and to secure and protect the people, facilities, and infrastructure of the Pentagon Reservation and DoD-leased facilities in the NCR.[1] Although the DA&M is considered to be part of the OSD, the post does not explicitly require Senate confirmation.[2]

The DoD General Counsel is the Regulatory Policy Officer responsible for monitoring regulatory activities within DoD to ensure uniform compliance with the implementation of executive and legislative requirements and priorities. Nevertheless, the DA&M is considered the "functional proponent" for the DoD Regulatory Program and the Plan, and so oversees the operational requirements of the regulatory process. For example, the retrospective review of DoD rules required by Executive Order 13563 is a "special focus of interest" for the DA&M.[3] EO 13563, signed by President Obama on January 18, 2011, directed all Federal agencies to "promote predictability and reduce uncertainty" in America's regulatory code by ensuring that existing regulations are "accessible, consistent, written in plain language, and easy to understand."[4]

History

This position originated in 1949 as the Assistant Secretary of Defense (Administration and Public Affairs), established as one of the three assistant secretary posts authorized by amendments to the National Security Act (P.L. 81-216, amended 10 August 1949). That post was abolished in 1950, its duties transferred to the Assistant Secretary of Defense (Manpower). In July 1964, the post of Assistant Secretary of Defense (Administration) was established, only to be redesignated in November 1971 as the Deputy Assistant Secretary of Defense (Administration). In May 1988, this office was retitled Director of Administration and Management, per Defense Directive 5105.53.[5]

Office Holders

The table below includes both the various titles of this post over time, as well as all the holders of those offices.

Director of Administration and Management[5]
Name Tenure SecDef(s) Served Under President(s) Served Under
Assistant Secretary of Defense (Administration and Public Affairs)
Paul H. Griffith September 12, 1949 - November 15, 1950 Louis A. Johnson
George C. Marshall
Harry Truman
Assistant Secretary of Defense (Administration)
Solis Horwitz July 1, 1964 - January 29, 1969 Robert S. McNamara
Clark M. Clifford
Melvin R. Laird
Lyndon Johnson
Richard Nixon
Robert F. Froehlke January 30, 1969 - June 30, 1971 Melvin R. Laird Richard Nixon
David O. Cooke (Acting) June 30, 1971 - November 3, 1971 Melvin R. Laird Richard Nixon
Deputy Assistant Secretary of Defense (Administration)
David O. Cooke November 4, 1971 - May 23, 1988 Melvin R. Laird
Elliot L. Richardson
James R. Schlesinger
Donald H. Rumsfeld
Harold Brown
Caspar W. Weinberger
Frank C. Carlucci III
Richard Nixon
Gerald Ford
Jimmy Carter
Ronald Reagan
Director of Administration and Management
David O. Cooke May 24, 1988 - June 22, 2002 Frank C. Carlucci III
William H. Taft IV (Acting)
Richard B. Cheney
Leslie Aspin, Jr.
William J. Perry
William S. Cohen
Donald H. Rumsfeld
Ronald Reagan
George H. W. Bush
Bill Clinton
George W. Bush
Raymond F. DuBois, Jr. October 1, 2002 - June 17, 2003 (Assumed Duties)
June 18, 2003 - May 2005[6]
Donald H. Rumsfeld George W. Bush
Michael B. Donley[7] May 9, 2005 - June 20, 2008 Donald H. Rumsfeld
Robert M. Gates
George W. Bush
Michael L. Rhodes[8] June 21, 2008 - March 24, 2010 (Acting)
March 25, 2010 -
Robert M. Gates George W. Bush
Barack Obama

Budget

Budget Totals

The annual budget for the DA&M is contained in the OSD's budget, under the Defense-Wide Operation and Maintenance (O&M) account. The Obama administration is expecting to cut funding for this position by ~18% in FY12. Importantly, this line item does not include funding for personnel compensation or benefits, which comes out of the OSD Core Operating Program.

DA&M Budget, FY 11-12 ($ in thousands, nominal) [9]
Line Item FY11 Estimate FY12 Estimate
Director of Administration and Management 6,519 5,351

Budget Functions

The DA&M funding supports the Civil Liberties Office, Defense Privacy Office, Defense Reform Initiative, Defense Historian, and the Directorate for Organizational and Management Planning.

References


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