Direct to garment printing


Direct to garment printing

Direct to garment printing, also known as DTG printing, digital garment printing and inkjet to garment printing, is a process of printing on textiles and garments using specialized or modified inkjet technology. The two key requirements of a DTG printer are a transport mechanism for the garment and specialty inks (inkjet textile inks) that are applied to the textile directly and are absorbed by the fibers.

Some direct to garment printers are manufactured from pre-existing inkjet printers, namely Epson, Brother, and Anajet, but other companies, such as Kornit, Mimaki, and Durst have printers specially designed for fabric printing.

with exceptions where DTG printers have been built using lower-resolution industrial inkjet print heads like those found in large-format printers used to print signs and banners. Some inkjet technology manufacturers offer products designed for direct textile printing, providing heads, printers and inks. Direct to garment printers boast the largest print area and lowest ink cost of any tabletop inkjet to garment printer.

The resolution and speed of the inkjet printers have been increased greatly over the last 10 years. This development has resulted in fast development of digital textile printing.

Sublimation inkjet printing is the major technology used in digital textile printing. As most fabrics are polyester or polyester-mixed, sublimation inkjet printing is widely used in digital textile printing. Since traditional screen printing costs more in terms of labor, digital textile printing, especially sublimation inkjet printing, is now becoming more and more popular in USA and Europe.

The majority of DTG printers are driven from a computer by the use of software known as a RIP (Raster Image Processor). The RIP software allows the printer to print with larger volumes of ink, generate white ink underbases for dark shirts and also provides for more precision color management through color profiles. More advanced RIP software allows for driving multiple printers from one computer, advanced job queuing, ink cost calculation as well as a real time preview of the file prior to printing.

Financial impact

Direct to garment printers can cost from $11,000 to over $200,000 depending on their print size, production capability as well as make and model.

A primary advantage of DTG printing is the lack of set-up costs and instant turnaround time not associated with traditional garment printing methods such as screen printing. The disadvantage of DTG is maintenance and ink cost. Furthermore, the ink technology developments have significantly improved ink performance and lowered ink cost. Digital printing technologies are non-contact, meaning that media is printed on without hand contact, allowing for a more precise image. This prevents the image distortion that takes place in screen printing.[1]

References


Wikimedia Foundation. 2010.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Digital textile printing — is described as any ink jet based method of printing colorants onto fabric. Most notably, digital textile printing is referred to when identifying either printing smaller designs onto garments (t shirts, dresses, promotional wear; abbreviated as… …   Wikipedia

  • Textile printing — is the process of applying colour to fabric in definite patterns or designs. In properly printed fabrics the colour is bonded with the fiber, so as to resist washing and friction. Textile printing is related to dyeing but, whereas in dyeing… …   Wikipedia

  • DTG — may refer to: Date time group Digital TV Group Differential Thermogravimetric Direct to garment printing Distance To Go Dynamic theory of gravity This disambiguation page lists articles associated with the same title. If an …   Wikipedia

  • T-shirt — For the Shontelle song, see T Shirt (song). A man wearing a T shirt …   Wikipedia

  • Business and Industry Review — ▪ 1999 Introduction Overview        Annual Average Rates of Growth of Manufacturing Output, 1980 97, Table Pattern of Output, 1994 97, Table Index Numbers of Production, Employment, and Productivity in Manufacturing Industries, Table (For Annual… …   Universalium

  • KABBALAH — This entry is arranged according to the following outline: introduction general notes terms used for kabbalah the historical development of the kabbalah the early beginnings of mysticism and esotericism apocalyptic esotericism and merkabah… …   Encyclopedia of Judaism

  • textile — /teks tuyl, til/, n. 1. any cloth or goods produced by weaving, knitting, or felting. 2. a material, as a fiber or yarn, used in or suitable for weaving: Glass can be used as a textile. adj. 3. woven or capable of being woven: textile fabrics. 4 …   Universalium

  • arts, East Asian — Introduction       music and visual and performing arts of China, Korea, and Japan. The literatures of these countries are covered in the articles Chinese literature, Korean literature, and Japanese literature.       Some studies of East Asia… …   Universalium

  • biblical literature — Introduction       four bodies of written works: the Old Testament writings according to the Hebrew canon; intertestamental works, including the Old Testament Apocrypha; the New Testament writings; and the New Testament Apocrypha.       The Old… …   Universalium

  • Laser printer — HP LaserJet 4200 series printer, installed atop high capacity paper feeder …   Wikipedia


We are using cookies for the best presentation of our site. Continuing to use this site, you agree with this.