Courtesy title


Courtesy title

In the context of nobility, a courtesy title is a title that is not a substantive title but rather is used through custom or courtesy.[1]

In France, for example, cadet males of noble families, especially landed aristocracy, may assume a lower courtesy title such as count even though lacking a titled seigneury themselves.[1]

There is a detailed system of styles and courtesy titles in the United Kingdom, by which the eldest son, male-line grandson or great-grandson and heir of a peer may use a subsidiary title of his ancestor even though it is the ancestor who holds the title substantively. By United Kingdom law, users of courtesy titles have nonetheless been held to be commoners, eligible for election to the House of Commons rather than the House of Lords.

In some contexts, courtesy title is used to mean the more general concept of a title or honorific such as Mr., Mrs., Ms., Dr., miss, sir, and madam. [2]

See also

References

  1. ^ Velde, François. Heraldica.org.Titles of Nobility. Retrieved 27 May 2011

Wikimedia Foundation. 2010.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Courtesy title — Courtesy Cour te*sy (k?r t? s?), n.; pl. {Courtesies} ( s?z). [OE. cortaisie, corteisie, courtesie, OF. curteisie, cortoisie, OF. curteisie, cortoisie, F. courtoisie, fr. curteis, corteis. See {Courteous}.] 1. Politeness; civility; urbanity;… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • courtesy title — noun 1. : a title granted by usage and in some cases royal permission to certain lineal relatives of British peers: as a. : a title in the style of a peerage borne by an heir in the direct line of a duke or marquess and by the eldest son of an… …   Useful english dictionary

  • Courtesy title — The courtesy title, one step below that of the actual rank of an heir. For example, a duke s first son could style himself earl , unless the family actually possessed other titles, in which case he would use the lesser titles as his own …   Medieval glossary

  • courtesy title — 1. a title applied or assumed through custom, courtesy, or association and without regard for its being officially merited. 2. a title allowed by custom, as to the children of dukes. [1860 65] * * * …   Universalium

  • courtesy title — noun Date: 1865 1. a title (as “Lord” added to the Christian name of a peer s younger son) used in addressing certain lineal relatives of British peers 2. a title (as “Professor” for any teacher) taken by the user and commonly accepted without… …   New Collegiate Dictionary

  • courtesy title — honorary title, title given for respectful reasons …   English contemporary dictionary

  • courtesy title — noun a title given to someone, especially the son or daughter of a peer, that has no legal validity …   English new terms dictionary

  • courtesy title — cour′tesy ti tle n. a title allowed by custom, as to the children of dukes • Etymology: 1860–65 …   From formal English to slang

  • courtesy title — /ˈkɜtəsi taɪtl/ (say kertuhsee tuytl) noun a title allowed by custom to a person who has no legal claim to it …   Australian English dictionary

  • Courtesy — Cour te*sy (k?r t? s?), n.; pl. {Courtesies} ( s?z). [OE. cortaisie, corteisie, courtesie, OF. curteisie, cortoisie, OF. curteisie, cortoisie, F. courtoisie, fr. curteis, corteis. See {Courteous}.] 1. Politeness; civility; urbanity; courtliness.… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English


Share the article and excerpts

Direct link
Do a right-click on the link above
and select “Copy Link”

We are using cookies for the best presentation of our site. Continuing to use this site, you agree with this.