Comics and Gaming Monthly


Comics and Gaming Monthly
C&G Monthly
Current C&G Monthly Logo
Executive Editor Brendan Frye
Categories Comics and Gaming
Frequency Monthly
First Issue Magazine: February 1 2010; Website: February 1 2010
Publisher Ronald P. Frye & Co. Publishers
Country Canada
Language English
ISSN 1920-9150
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Former C&G Monthly Logo

Comics and Gaming (better known as C&G) Monthly is a Canadian print and digital magazine which made its literary debut in February 2010. C&G Monthly, focusing on comics and gaming, was developed when a now discontinued Lucid Media, a comprehensive publication on Canadian arts and culture, split into two separate magazines. C&G Monthly's creation was to reach Lucid Media's growing audience of comic and gaming fans. C&G Monthly targets a mature audience. C&G Monthly provides feature editorials, news, interviews, previews, and reviews on comics and video games, video game hardware, and the comics and gaming industry. Although C&G Monthly is a Canadian publication, its material contains both national and international content concerning its industry of relevance.

Like the magazine, CGMonthly.com was launched on February 1, 2010. Updated daily, the website’s content includes feature editorials, news, interviews, previews, reviews, screenshots, and videos on comics and video games, video-game hardware, and the comics and gaming industry. The C&G Monthly website also includes user forums and blogs.

Contents

Sections

In each issue C&G Monthly includes the following sections:

  • Columns - Articles based on news, previews and varying topics; a combination of news and editorials about the comics and gaming industry.
  • Interviews - Features intimate conversations with some of the most influential people in the comics and gaming industry.
  • Features - Any cover stories/interviews or featured comics/games/issues that warrant a separate article would be told here. The main section of the magazine since it covers the topic present on the cover of the magazine.
  • Editorials - Articles on varying topics by C&G Monthly staff and freelance writers.
  • Reviews - A section where staff writers review the latest games.

Reviews: Scoring System

C&G Monthly uses a nominal scale from 1-100. Ratings are categorized within nominal increments of 10, however, there is an intentional gap between ratings of 0 and 49. The further away a rating is from 50 signifies the strength of a title's failure to meet the basic requirements expected in a comic or game.

Comics

  • Below 50 = Comics that fail to present even the most basic requirements of readability and intrigue to compel readers to continue reading material. Material is uninteresting and/or contains design flaws. Avoid at all costs.
  • 50-59 = Comics that meet the minimum requirements of readability, but just barely. Material is somewhat interesting and design problems are still present, but not to the point of complete distaste toward the title. Only desperate fans would see value in these titles.
  • 60-69 = Titles that manage to get most technical aspects of a comic book, without ever really moving beyond that. Flaws present can still have an impact on the reader's experience. Fans of the genre and more tolerant readers can enjoy these titles.
  • 70-79 = Comics that manage to keep technical and design flaws to a minimum while providing a solid experience. Generally enough to satisfy but not impress fans or readers outside the genre.
  • 80-89 = Comics that manage to provide a good, entertaining experience with only small flaws that are overlooked by the polish or innovation of the title. Both fans and newcomers to the genre will likely find something to appreciate here.
  • 90-100 = Comics with little to no flaws that provide an exceptional entertainment experience. New high watermarks of quality or design are established with such titles, and these comics are must-haves for fans of the genre as well as good places for newcomers to start.

Gaming

  • Below 50 = Games that fail to meet even the most basic requirements of entertainment and competence with serious mechanical and/or design flaws. Avoid at all costs.
  • 50-59 = Games that meet the minimum requirements of functionality, but just barely. Mechanical, technical and design problems are still present, but not to the point of complete unplayability. Only desperate fans would see value in these titles.
  • 60-69 = Games that manage to get it mostly right functionally, without ever really moving beyond that. Flaws present can still have an impact on the experience. Fans of the genre and more tolerant gamers can enjoy these titles.
  • 70-79 = Games that manage to keep mechanical, technical and design flaws to a minimum while providing a solid experience. generally enough to satisfy but not impress fans or gamers outside the genre.
  • 80-89 = Games that manage to provide a good, entertaining experience with only small flaws that are overlooked by the polish or innovation of the title. Both fans and newcomers to the genre will likely find something to appreciate here.
  • 90-100 = Games with little to no flaws that provide an exceptional entertainment experience. New high watermarks of quality or design are established with such titles, and these games are must-haves for fans of the genre as well as good places for newcomers to start.

Website

The C&G Monthly website launched the same time as the magazine and is meant to compliment the magazine also. The website is updated daily with content. Visitors of the website are able view select content from the magazine online, however, subscribers are able to view all content of the magazine online. Both C&G Monthly staff and freelancers contribute content to the website.

External Links


Wikimedia Foundation. 2010.

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