College of Nanoscale Science and Engineering


College of Nanoscale Science and Engineering
College of Nanoscale Science and Engineering
Established 2004
Type College
Academic affiliation University at Albany
Endowment $7.5 Billion
Director Alain E. Kaloyeros, Ph.D.
Chief academic officer Robert Geer, Ph.D.
Academic staff 50
Students 184
Undergraduates 33
Postgraduates 22
Doctoral students 129
Location Albany, New York
42°41′28.37″N 73°49′58.28″W / 42.6912139°N 73.8328556°W / 42.6912139; -73.8328556Coordinates: 42°41′28.37″N 73°49′58.28″W / 42.6912139°N 73.8328556°W / 42.6912139; -73.8328556
Website cnse.albany.edu
College of Nanoscale Science and Engineering

The College of Nanoscale Science and Engineering (CNSE), on the campus of the University at Albany (SUNY Albany) is a global education, research, development and technology deployment resource for students and researchers in nanotechnology. Since its inception in 2004, CNSE has gained worldwide recognition as a leader and pioneer in nanotechnology education, innovation, and economic outreach and investment.[1]

CNSE’s Albany NanoTech Complex is a $12 billion, 800,000-square-foot (74,000 m2) complex that includes an industrial-scale 80,000-square-foot (7,400 m2) cleanroom "as well as a collection of equipment perhaps unique in the world."[2] The cleanroom space is Class 1-capable and houses a fully integrated, 300 mm wafer, computer chip pilot prototyping and demonstration line. More than 2,500 scientists, researchers, engineers, students, and faculty work on site at CNSE’s Albany NanoTech Complex, from leading global companies including IBM, AMD, GlobalFoundries, SEMATECH, Toshiba, Applied Materials, Tokyo Electron, ASML, Novellus Systems, Vistec Lithography, and Atotech.[3]

Contents

History

The College of Nanoscale Science and Engineering was originally established as the School of Nanosciences and Nanoengineering at the University at Albany in 2001. It began as a combined vision of government, academia, and industry. The common goal was to propel New York to a leadership position in technology and economic development. Four key drivers comprised the strategy: select an overarching discipline (nanotechnology); invest in state-of-the-art infrastructure; focus on world-class, hands-on education and training incorporating the entire supply chain; and leverage public-private partnerships.[citation needed] CNSE was accredited as the College of Nanoscale Science and Engineering of the University at Albany in 2004, and in December of that year, awarded its first Ph.D. degrees in nanoscience.[4]

Academics

CNSE offers degree programs leading to the Bachelor of Science (B.S.) degree in Nanoscale Engineering and Nanoscale Science,[5] the Masters of Science (M.S.) degree in either Nanoscale Science or Nanoscale Engineering, and the Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) degree in either Nanoscale Science or Nanoscale Engineering. CNSE also offers a combined Masters of Science and Masters of Business Administration (M.S.-MBA) degree, the "Nano+MBA," with the ability to earn the M.S. degree in either Nanoscale Science or Nanoscale Engineering,[6] or enroll in the nanotechnology elective track while participating in UAlbany's Evening MBA program.[7] Additionally, CNSE and SUNY Downstate Medical Center offer a joint M.D. and Ph.D. program.[8] The program allows students to earn an M.D. in Medicine and a Ph.D. in Nanoscale Science or Engineering.[9] CNSE became the first college to launch a comprehensive baccalaureate program in Nanoscale Engineering and Nanoscale Science.[10]

Campus

CNSE's Albany NanoTech Complex is located at the western end of the University at Albany campus in Albany, New York.[11] NanoFab 200 (CESTM), an earlier part of the campus, was completed June 1997. This 70,000-square-foot (6,500 m2), $16.5 million facility includes 4,000 square feet (370 m2) feet of cleanroom space, plus CNSE metrology labs and office space for programs such as SUNY’s Atmospheric Sciences Research Center. NanoFab South (NFS), completed March 2004, is a 150,000-square-foot (14,000 m2), $50 million facility including 32,000 square feet (3,000 m2) of 300 mm wafer, class 1-capable cleanroom space. Completed December 2005, NanoFab North (NFN) is a 230,000-square-foot (21,000 m2), $175 million facility including 35,000 square feet (3,300 m2) of cleanroom space with Class 1-capable 300mm wafer production. The most recent expansion of the Albany NanoTech Complex was completed in March 2009. The $150 million project includes NanoFab East, a 250,000-square-foot (23,000 m2) office, laboratory, and classroom building, in addition to NanoFab Central, a separate 100,000-square-foot (9,300 m2) building that houses 15,000 square feet (1,400 m2) of 300mm wafer, class 1 -apable cleanroom space.[12] The NanoFab North facility also houses a $65 million tool that uses extreme ultraviolet light to produce the world's smallest integrated circuits, and is one of only two in the world.[13]

Panorama of the College of Nanoscale Science and Engineering in Albany, New York

Constellations

The traditional departmental structure at CNSE is tailored into constellation "think-tanks" that encourage and stimulate cross-disciplinary educational curricula and research programs.[14] There are four such think-tanks. Nanoscience refers to the observation, identification, description, discovery, experimental investigation, and theoretical interpretation of nanoscale phenomena.[15] Nanoengineering is the application of nanoscience principles to practical ends, such as the design, manufacture, and operation of efficient and functional structures, machines, processes, and systems on the atomic scale.[16] Nanobioscience refers to the application of nanoscale scientific concepts and principles to the study of biological and biomedical structures and systems.[17] Nanoeconomics is the formulation, study, and analysis of the economic and business principles underlying the development and deployment of nanoscale know-how, products, and systems.[18]

Research

CNSE is the site of "one of the world's most advanced cleanrooms for making prototypes of next-generation chips".[19] Academic and corporate scientists are engaged in leading-edge research in fields including energy and power electronics, interconnect sciences, EUV lithography, and nanoelectronics.[20]

Strategic technology and commercialization centers and programs

CNSE is the home of numerous pioneering nanotechnology programs funded by a variety of public and private sources. CNSE is able to accelerate the commercialization of technologies by providing technology deployment, market development, economic outreach and business assistance under a variety of centers and programs.

  • The Applied Materials (AMAT) R&D Center is a $300 million center focusing on immersion lithography; AMAT’s only R&D facility outside its headquarters in San Jose, California.[21]
  • CG Power Center for Intelligent Power (CIP) spurs new opportunities for advanced research and development, prototyping, and education and workforce training to facilitate clean energy and smart grid technologies.[22]
  • The Center for Nanoscale Lithography is a partnership between CNSE and Vistec Lithography to develop advances in electron-beam lithography, used in nanoelectronics manufacturing.[23]
  • The Center for National Nanotechnology Innovation & Commercialization (NNICC) was established through a research partnership between the U.S. Army Research Laboratory (ARL) and CNSE to develop nanotechnology-driven products and devices that support Army combat operations and enhance the protection of its troops.[24]
  • The Center for Semiconductor Research (CSR) is a multi-phase cooperative program on computer chip technology nodes; partners include IBM, AMD, Toshiba, Tokyo Electron Ltd., and Applied Materials (AMAT).[25]
  • The Computer Chip Hybrid Integration Partnership (CHIP) is a cross-regional partnership between CNSE and the SUNY Institute of Technology (SUNYIT) in Utica-Rome resulting in the development of Computer Chip Commercialization Center at SUNYIT funded with $92.5 million in New York state capital funds, along with a capital investment from IBM, Intel and SEMATECH.[26]
  • International Multiphase Program for Lithography Science and Engineering (IMPLSE) is a collaborative effort, with ASML and IBM,[27] focusing on immersion and EUV technologies.[28]
  • International SEMATECH is a 12-member global consortium of major computer chip manufacturers that has established its global headquarters and operations at CNSE.[29] SEMATECH-administered centers include the EUV Resist Test Center, EUV Mask Blank Development Center, EUV Process Development Center, Alternative Lithography Technologies Center, 3D Interconnect Center and Advanced Metrology Center.[30]
  • International Venture for Nanolithography (INVENT) is a global industry-university consortium that focuses on developing microchips with smaller features and building a future workforce for the industry; partners include Advanced Micro Devices (AMD), ASML, IBM, and Micron Technology.[31]
  • The Nanotechnology Innovation and Commercialization Excelerator (NICE) is a partnership between Lockheed Martin, CNSE, and the CenterState Corporation for Economic Opportunity (CenterState CEO), the Salina, NY-based NICE initiative fosters collaboration and enables the development of nanoscale applications for commercial deployment.[32]
  • The National Institute for Sustainable Energy (NISE) is headquartered at CNSE and in partnership with Einhorn Yaffee Prescott (EYP) Architecture and Engineering PC of Albany, NISE is a collaboration focused on energy efficiency and new energy technology.[33] Through NISE, CNSE and EYP formed an initiative called Nanotechnology Instruction for Design, Engineering and Architecture (NanoIDEA), to prepare building designers, architects and operators to utilize nanoscale-enabled sensors, controls and other innovations for the construction and operation of high-tech facilities. In addition, an Alternative Energy Test Farm was opened at CNSE to evaluate zero energy concepts based on the development and testing of nanomaterials and nanoelectronics for clean energy technologies such as fuel cells, solar photovoltaic cells, ultracapacitors and power electronics.[34]
  • The New York Center for National Competitiveness in Nanoscale Characterization (NC3) is a joint collaboration between the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), through its Center for Nanoscale Science and Technology (CNST), and CNSE to tackle some of the most critical challenges facing the nanotechnology industry, including obtaining precise measurements at the atomic and sub-atomic levels.[35][36]
  • The New York State Center of Excellence in Nanoelectronics and Nanotechnology (NYS CENN) was established at CNSE, is a fully integrated technology deployment, product prototyping, manufacturing support, and workforce training resource for emerging generations of integrated circuitry (IC). Its targeted portfolio of nanoelectronics-based products ranges from emerging microprocessor and memory computer chips with higher functionality and complexity, to the rapidly evolving areas of micro- and nanosystem based "systems-on-a-chip" (SOC) technologies, including biochips, optoelectronics and photonics devices, and nanosensors for energy and the environment.[37]
  • The Smart System Technology & Commercialization Center (STC) was created through a merger of two of New York State's Centers of Excellence: Infotonics Technology Center (ITC) in Canandaigua and the Center of Excellence in Nanoelectronics and Nanotechnology (CENN) at the CNSE.[38] The center is a vertically integrated "one-stop-shop" for smart systems' device development and process manufacturing.[39]
  • The TEL Technology Center, America R&D Center (TEL TTCA) is Tokyo Electron Ltd.’s only R&D facility outside Japan: a $300 million center established to conduct R&D of cutting-edge semiconductor materials and processes.[40]
  • Headquartered at CNSE, the U.S. Photovoltaic Manufacturing Consortium (PVMC) is a partnership between SEMATECH and the College of Nanoscale Science and Engineering at UAlbany, as well as with the University of Central Florida. The goal of PVMC is to develop new photovoltaic manufacturing technologies, streamline their introduction into the global market, and help the United States gain a greater market share.[41] In April 2011, the PVMC secured a grant from the U.S. Department of Energy totaling $62.5 million; $57.5 million awarded to CNSE and $5 million awarded to the University of Central Florida.[42]

Academic centers and programs

  • The Center for Advanced Interconnect Science and Technology (CAIST) is an academic partnership led by CNSE[43] and currently including Binghamton University, Columbia University, Cornell University, Lehigh University, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Penn State, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Stanford University, University of Florida, University of Maryland, University of North Texas, University of Texas at Arlington, and University of Texas at Austin.[44]
  • The Center for Advanced Technology in Nanomaterials and Nanoelectronics (CATN2) is a CNSE-led consortium of research universities and nanoelectronics, optoelectronics, telecommunications, defense, and nanobiotechnology companies.[45]
  • The Center for Sustainable Ecosystem Nanotechnologies (CSEN) Center for Sustainable Ecosystem Nanotechnologies provides critical design and analysis, pilot proto-typing, and proof of concept to enable advanced systems and structures for integration within a host of renewable energy technologies.[46]
  • The Energy and Environmental Technology Applications Center (E2TAC) is a public-private partnership that focuses on CNSE’s nanotechnology applications for alternative energy and environmental technologies.[47]
  • The Focus Center – New York (FC-NY) was established by the Semiconductor Industry Association (SIA) and the Defense Advanced Research Programs Agency (DARPA) at CNSE; addresses long-term challenges in developing next-generation computer chips.[48]
  • The Institute for Nanoelectronics Discovery and Exploration (INDEX) is one of four such research institutes in the country,[49] the CNSE-led INDEX includes Harvard University, Yale University, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, California Institute of Technology, Columbia University, North Carolina State University, University of Virginia, Purdue University, Georgia Institute of Technology, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, as well as Intel, Micron, AMD, IBM, Texas Instruments, and Freescale Semiconductor, Inc.[50]

See also

  • List of Semiconductor Fabrication Plants

References

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  2. ^ Schneider, Howard (2 November 2010). "A boom based on microchips: Public money helps underwrite major N.Y. manufacturing investment". The Washington Post. http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2010/11/02/AR2010110205134.html. Retrieved 8 March 2011. 
  3. ^ Murphy, Myatt. "Upstate Success" Southwest Airlines Spirit Magazine Dec. 2. 2009: 129–135. Print.
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  6. ^ "Graduate Programs". College of Nanoscale Science and Engineering. Retrieved 2011-01-07.
  7. ^ "MBA Track in Nanotechnology". College of Nanoscale Science and Engineering. Retrieved 2011-01-07.
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  36. ^ "NIST and UAlbany NanoCollege sign partnership agreement". Nanowerk. Nanowerk. http://www.nanowerk.com/news/newsid=5404.php. Retrieved 10 March 2011. 
  37. ^ "Center of Excellence in Nanoelectronics and Nanotechnology". College of Nanoscale Science and Engineering. Retrieved 2011-01-07.
  38. ^ Deckert, Andrea (20 September 2010). "Infotonics Center to merge with Albany center". Rochester Business Journal. http://www.rbj.net/article.asp?aID=185146. Retrieved 10 March 2011. 
  39. ^ "Smart System Technology & Commercialization Center". College of Nanoscale Science and Engineering. Retrieved 2011-01-07.
  40. ^ "Tokyo Electron Plugging $300M R&D Center into Albany, N.Y.". Site Selection. Conway Data, Inc.. http://www.siteselection.com/ssinsider/bbdeal/bd021202.htm. Retrieved 10 March 2011. 
  41. ^ "[1]". College of Nanoscale Science and Engineering. Retrieved 2011-04-08.
  42. ^ Rulison, Larry (6 April 2011). "NanoCollege awarded $57.5M". Times Union. http://www.timesunion.com/business/article/NanoCollege-awarded-57-5M-1323701.php#ixzz1IjvG7qpJ. Retrieved 8 April 2011. 
  43. ^ "Semiconductor Research Corporation – SRC". Semiconductor Research Corporation – SRC. Semiconductor Research Corporation – SRC. http://www.src.org/program/grc/caist/. Retrieved 10 March 2011. 
  44. ^ "Center for Advanced Interconnect Science and Technology". College of Nanoscale Science and Engineering. Retrieved 2011-01-07.
  45. ^ "Center for Advanced Technology in Nanomaterials and Nanoelectronics". College of Nanoscale Science and Engineering. Retrieved 2011-01-07.
  46. ^ "Corporate leader Dr John Elter joins faculty of Ualbany Nanocollege". Fuel Cell Today. Fuel Cell Today. http://www.fuelcelltoday.com/online/news/articles/2008-03/Corporate-leader-Dr-John-Elter-joins-faculty. Retrieved 10 March 2011. 
  47. ^ "E2TAC". College of Nanoscale Science and Engineering. Retrieved 2010-01-10
  48. ^ "Focus Center – New York". College of Nanoscale Science and Engineering. Retrieved 2011-01-07.
  49. ^ "Nanoelectronics Center to Open at Notre Dame". Inside Indiana Business. Grow Indiana Media Ventures, LLC. http://www.insideindianabusiness.com/newsitem.asp?ID=28526. Retrieved 10 March 2011. 
  50. ^ "University of Albany Awarded $435m to Establish Institute for Nanoelectronics Discovery and Exploration". Azo Nanotechnology. AZoM.com. http://www.azonano.com/news.asp?newsID=1748. Retrieved 10 March 2011. 

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