Holy Trinity Church, Coventry


Holy Trinity Church, Coventry
Holy Trinity Church, Coventry

Holy Trinity Church (left)

52°24′31″N 01°30′32″W / 52.40861°N 1.50889°W / 52.40861; -1.50889Coordinates: 52°24′31″N 01°30′32″W / 52.40861°N 1.50889°W / 52.40861; -1.50889
Denomination Church of England
Churchmanship Broad Church
Website www.holytrinitycoventry.org.uk
History
Dedication Holy Trinity
Administration
Parish Coventry
Diocese Coventry
Province Canterbury
Clergy
Vicar(s) Revd David Mayhew (from 2009)

Holy Trinity Church, Coventry is a parish church in the Church of England located in Coventry City Centre, West Midlands, England.

Above the chancel arch is probably the most impressive Doom wall-painting now remaining in an English church.

Contents

History

The church dates from the 12th century.[1] It is 59 metres (194 feet) long, and has a spire 72 metres (237 feet) high.

The church was restored in 1665–1668, and the tower was recased in 1826 by Thomas Rickman. The east end was rebuilt in 1786 and the west front by Richard Charles Hussey in 1843.

The inside of the church was restored by George Gilbert Scott in 1854.

Further information can be found on the Holy Trinity Church Coventry website (see to the right).

Doom painting

The church is famous for its medieval doom painting which was re-discovered and restored in 2002.[2]

Organ

The church had a pipe organ which had evolved over a long period of time with work by many builders, the last by Henry Willis and Sons. A specification of the organ can be found on the National Pipe Organ Register.[3]

Organ Appeal

Holy Trinity is currently raising money to purchase a new organ, this will cost approximately £600,000, any donation is widely appreciated.

History

  • 1526: This is the earliest recorded organ, built by John Howe and John Clynmowe of London for £30. In the late 16th century it was dismantled as the Puritan clergy at Holy Trinity disapproved of organs.
  • 1631: Samuel Buggs (Vicar), "procured" a replacement instrument.
  • 1640s: Puritans back in charge, organ sold for £30.
  • 1732: The German Thomas Swarbrick, who also supplied a new organ for Coventry Cathedral (Old Cathedral), built one for Holy Trinity for £600. It was placed upon a gallery erected for it across the Nave and had 2 manuals.
  • 1829: Swell and pedal added.
  • 1855-1861: As part of the George Gilbert Scott restoration of the church, a new organ chamber was built in the westernmost bay of the south chancel aisle. This instrument of 3 manuals plus pedals, was built by Forster and Andrews for £800.
  • 1900: Rebuilt by W. Hill & Sons with some of the old work incorporated; 4 manuals.
  • 1923: Electric blowing chest added.
  • 1933: J. Charles Lee of Coventry added pneumatic pistons.
  • 1961: Rebuilt for £12,200 by the firm of Henry Willis, the organ contained 59 speaking stops, each with 61 pipes, along with 30 couplers and 3 tremolos.
  • 2007: Organ was dismantled, due to it being beyond repair. A funding appeal has been launched for a new organ, which will cost approximately £600,000.

List of Organists

  • John Barker 1731–1752[4]
  • Capel Bond 1752–1790
  • William Chater
  • Frank Frederick Cuisset ca. 1851 (later organist of Bishop Ryder Church, Birmingham and St. Mary's Church, Selly Oak, Birmingham)
  • Charles Harry Moody 1899–1902 (later organist of Ripon Cathedral)
  • Christie Green 1912[5] — 1918 (previously organist of Blackburn Parish Church, afterwards organist of St. Margaret's Church, Altrincham, Cheshire)
  • Harold B. Osmond 1918 – ca. 1921[6] (formerly organist of St Peters, Thanet)
  • John Barber ca. 1946
  • Leonard Tanner B Mus. FRCO. ca.1950 - 1960
  • Martyn Lane — Organist and Master of the Choristers — 1965–1975
  • Peter Johnson 1975–1979
  • Andrew Moodie ca. 1981
  • Jeremy Filsell — circa 1981
  • Christopher Howard 1981–1990 — Director of Music.
  • Indra Hughes 1990–1992 (Organist and Master of the Choristers)
  • David Baxter — 1982–1991 — under baton of Christopher Howard and Indra Hughes
  • Christopher Howard — Director of Music — 1992 – present day.

List of assistant organists

  • Norman Coke-Jephcott 1909–1911

List of Vicars

Dates listed are of appointment, unless otherwise noted.[7]

  • Ralph de Sove, (no dates known)
  • Henry de Harenhale, 1298
  • John de Holland, 1334
  • John Greneburgh, 1346
  • Egidius Fillilod, 1349
  • William Swet, 1380
  • John de Amcotes, 1381
  • John Brideston, (no dates known)
  • William Gamell, 1383
  • Nicholas Crosloy, 1421
  • John Meneley, 1443
  • Thomas Bowde, (no dates known)
  • Thomas Orton, 1508
  • Richard Collett, (no dates known)
  • Nicholas Darington, 1527
  • Roger Capp, (no dates known)
  • William Benet, 1546
  • George Brooche, 1554
  • George Cheston, 1568
  • Anthony Fletcher, 1576
  • Humphrey Fenne, 1577
  • Richard Eaton, 1590
  • Thomas Cooper, 1604
  • Samuel Gibson, 1610
  • John Staresmore, 1618
  • Samuel Buggs, 1626
  • Henry Carpenter, 1633
  • Joseph Brown, 1636
  • Robert Proctor, 1638
  • John Bryan, 1644
  • Nathaniel Wanley, 1662
  • Samuel Barton, 1680
  • Jonathan Kimberley, 1681
  • Samuel Kimberley, 1712
  • John Macklin, 1734
  • Nathaniel Gerard, 1752
  • Joseph Rann, 1773
  • John Davies, 1811
  • Walter Farquhar Hook, 1828–1837 (afterwards Vicar of Leeds Parish Church)[8]
  • John Howells, 1837
  • William Drake, 1857
  • Alfred William Wilson, 1864
  • Francis M. Beaumont, 1872–1912
  • R. Basil Littlewood, 1912
  • Acland F. O'N. Williams, 1929
  • Graham W. Clitheroe, 1931
  • Lawrence Jackson, 1965 - 1973 (later Provost of Blackburn)
  • Nigel Douglas Blayney Abbott, 1973 - 1980 (later Provost of Oban)
  • Graham Dow, 1981–1992 (later Bishop of Carlisle)
  • David Andrew Urquhart, 1992–2000 (later Bishop of Birmingham)
  • Gordon Keith Sinclair, 2001–2007 (now Bishop of Birkenhead)
  • David Mayhew, 2009–present

References

  1. ^ History, Gazetteer, and Directory of Warwickshire, Francis White & Co, 1850.
  2. ^ Collaboration in the Arts from the Middle Ages to the Present, Silvia Bigliazzi, Sharon Wood, Ashgate Publishing, Ltd., 2006. ISBN 0754655121.
  3. ^ National Pipe Organ Register.
  4. ^ Temperley, Nicholas (1979) The Music of the English Parish Church; vol. 1. Cambridge; New York: Cambridge University Press
  5. ^ Thornsby, Frederick W., ed. (1912) Dictionary of Organs and Organists. Bournemouth: Logan
  6. ^ Thornsby, Frederick W., ed. (1921) Dictionary of Organs and Organists; 2nd ed. London: G. A. Mate
  7. ^ Names and dates taken from the carved wooden plaque in the Archdeacon's Court. The plaque was dedicated to the memory of Franics M. Beaumont and installed sometime in the early twentieth century. Early dates may be approximate.
  8. ^ The Deans: Cathedral Life, Yesterday, Today and Tomorrow. Trevor Beeson. SCM-Canterbury Press Ltd, 2004. ISBN 0334029872.

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