List of dissenting academies (1660–1800)


List of dissenting academies (1660–1800)

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This is a list of dissenting academies, English and Welsh educational institutions run by Dissenters to provide an education, and often a vocational training as a minister of religion, outside the Church of England. It runs from the English Restoration of 1660, which created a parallel educational system as a side-effect, to the end of the 18th century. See List of dissenting academies (19th century) for later history.

See also: Category:Dissenting academy tutors, for more information about individual Dissenters as teachers.

Sources: This list includes the academies (except where otherwise noted) from the first appendix to Irene Parker, Dissenting Academies in England (1914),[1] a work in the public domain. The author comments that Quaker establishments were excluded from her listing. The notes refer to the Dictionary of National Biography (DNB), and its successor the Oxford Dictionary of National Biography (ODNB), to reference and cross-check; DNB biographies are being created at Wikisource and added as links to the existing articles. Some of the information about dates is uncertain, and details about students are sometimes contentious. The "Surman Index" links are to lists of Congregational ministers trained in academies, made available by The Surman Index Online, Dr Williams's Centre for Dissenting Studies, http://surman.english.qmul.ac.uk.

Contents

East Anglia

Institution Dates Tutors Students
Ipswich[2] 1698-1734(?). John Langton or Langston (d. 1704).
Palgrave Academy, Suffolk.[3] 1775-1785 under Anna Laetitia Barbauld and her husband Rochemont. Rochemont Barbauld. Arthur Aikin, Charles Rochemont Aikin, Thomas Denman, Basil William Douglas, Thomas Douglas, William Gell, Henri de La Fite, Frank Sayers,[4] William Taylor, Isaac Weld.[5]
Saffron Walden[6] 1680-(?). John[7] or William Payne, assisted by Fund Board when the latter was first started. John Guyse.[7]
Wickhambrook[8] 1670-1696 (?) (when tutor removed to Bishop's Stortford). Samuel Cradock.[9] Edmund Calamy,[10] Timothy Goodwin.[11]

London area

Institution Dates Tutors Students
Bethnal Green. Migratory (Highgate, Clerkenwell). 1680(?)-1696(?).[12] Thomas Brand[13] with John Kerr, M.D.[14] Charles Owen,[15] Samuel Palmer, etc.[16]
Cheshunt, then Higham Hill, Walthamstow.[3][17] 1790-1816 Eliezer Cogan.[18] Benjamin Disraeli, Russell Gurney,[19] Samuel Sharpe.[18][20]
Cheshunt College.[3][21] Moved to Cheshunt from Trefeca. 1792-1906. In 1906 moved to Cheshunt College, Cambridge. William Hendry Stowell, president 1850,[22] Henry Robert Reynolds, president 1860-94.[23] John Abbs, Henry Allon.
New College at Hackney[3] 1786-1796 Andrew Kippis
Highbury College. Not in Parker.
Hoxton Square, moved to Hoxton Square from Coventry. 1700-1729 (?). Joshua Oldfield,[24] John Spademan,[24][25] William Lorimer,[24] Jean Cappel.[24] Nathaniel Lardner.
Islington (1)[26] 1672-1680. Ralph Button.[27] Joseph Jekyll,[28] Samuel Pomfret.[29]
Islington (2) Migratory (Woodford Bridge, Essex (plague), Battersea, Wimbledon, etc.). 1672-1707 (?). Thomas Doolittle,[30][31] assisted by Thomas Vincent,[32] Thomas Rowe (?).[33] Samuel Bury,[34][31] Edmund Calamy,[10][31] Thomas Emlyn,[31][35] John Kerr, M.D. (later tutor, Highgate and Bethnal Green),[31] Matthew Henry.[31]
Mill Hill[36] (?)-1701 (?). Richard Swift (died 1701), active at Edgware.[37]
Newington Green (1) Migratory (Little Britain, Clapham). 1665 (?) to about 1706. Theophilus Gale, M.A., Fellow of Magdalen College, Oxford (d. 1678).[38] Thomas Rowe (d. 1706).[33] Thomas and Benoni Rowe, John Ashford;[38] Isaac Watts, John Evans,[39] Daniel Neal, Henry Grove (later tutor at Taunton),[40] John Hughes, Josiah Hort, Samuel Say.[41]
Newington Green (2) 1667 (?) to about 1706. Charles Morton, who in 1685 went to New England, and was succeeded by Stephen Lobb; William Wickens,[42] Francis Glasscock. William Hocker, Samuel Lawrence,[43] Thomas Reynolds,[44] John Shower, under Morton;[45] Joseph Hussey under Morton;[46] also Daniel Defoe, Samuel Wesley,[47] Kitt, Butterby, William Jenkyn.[48]
Newington Green (3), established by King's Head Society. Migratory: Deptford, Stepney, Addle Street (from where it moved in 1744 after having joined the Fund Board Academy), Mile End; Independent College, Homerton which later became part of New College London. 1730-1744-1850 Abraham Taylor,[49] Samuel Parsons, John Hubbard after 1744, Zephaniah Marryat (died 1754), D.D., John Conder who became head at Homerton.[50] Robert Robinson under Marryat;[51] Conder under Parsons at Clerkenwell;[52] Thomas Cogan under Conder; John Stafford and John Fell under Conder at Mile End;[53][54] Samuel Pike under Hubbard at Stepney.[55]
Wapping[56] 1675 (?) to 1680-1. Edward Veal. The DNB states that his congregation was at Wapping, but the academy was at Stepney.[57] Joseph Boyse,[58] Timothy Rogers,[59] John Shower, Samuel Wesley.[47]
Wellclose Square (Coward Trust), moved to Hoxton Square in 1762. 1744-1785 Samuel Morton Savage,[60] David Jennings, Andrew Kippis, Abraham Rees.[61] Thomas Cogan, Philip Furneaux, Thomas Jervis, Abraham Rees, Joshua Toulmin,[62][63][64] William Wood.
London (various parts), supported by Fund Board. Migratory (Pinner, Moorfields: see Newington Green). 1696-1744 Thomas Goodwin,[65] Isaac Chauncey,[66] Thomas Ridgley, D.D.,[67] John Eames,[68] Joseph Densham.[69] John Conder under Ridgley and Eames at Moorfields;[52] John Howard, David Jennings, Samuel Pike, David Williams, all under Eames.[55]
London. 'A less literary seminary but it continued only for a few years.' 1760-(?). Samuel Pike.[55]

Midlands

Institution Dates Tutors Students
Alcester[70] (?)-1720 (?). Joseph Porter, on whose death (1721)[71][72] students were moved to Stratford-on-Avon.
Bedworth[73] 1690-(?). Julius Saunders[74] and John Kirkpatrick.[75]
Bridgnorth[76] 1726-1735 (?). John Fleming, who moved to Stratford-on-Avon when John Alexander went to Dublin.[77][78] Edward Pickard.[79]
Bromsgrove (or Stourbridge)[80] 1665-1692(?). Henry Hickman,[81] B.D., Fellow of Magdalen, Oxford (d. 1692). Thomas Cotton.
Coventry[82] 1663-1700 (moved 1700 to London by Joshua Oldfield) John Bryan (d. 1675),[83] Obadiah Grew (d. 1689), Thomas Shewell, M.A. (d. 1693),[84] Joshua Oldfield,[24] assisted by William Tong.[85] Samuel Pomfret.[29]
Findern, afterwards at Derby. (?)-1754. Thomas Hill (d. 1720),[86] Ebenezer Latham (d. 1754).[87]
Lincoln 1668-1680. Edward Reyner, but died c.1660. John Disney.[88]
Market Harborough, moved to Mile End.[89][90] From 1758 to 1781, boarding pupils. Stephen Addington, after John Aikin left the area.
Nettlebed (Oxfordshire) 1666-1697. Thomas Cole,[91] M.A. (Christ Church, Oxford). John Locke was a student of Cole's, but before his ejectment.
Newport Pagnell, merged in Cheshunt (?). 1783 William Bull,[92][93] J. Bull, M.A., J. Watson, W. Foggart. John Leach (judge).[93]
Northampton (see Daventry Academy for continuity). Migratory, it started at Kibworth under John Jennings, moved to Hinckley, Market Harborough, and in 1729 to Northampton. After 1752 to Daventry, back to Northampton, Wymondley, Byng Place, and 1850 merged into New College, London. 1715 (?). John Jennings (d. 1723), Philip Doddridge, Caleb Ashworth,[94] Thomas Robins,[95] Thomas Belsham, John Horsey in Northampton,[96] William Parry in Wymondley.[97] John Cope and John Mason[98] under Jennings; Stephen Addington,[99] Philip Holland (with brothers John and Henry) and Andrew Kippis under Doddridge;[100] John Stafford under Doddridge at Northampton;[53] Benjamin Fawcett under Doddridge;[101] Samuel Dyer;[102] Henry Moore under Doddridge and Ashworth;[103] Samuel Palmer under Ashworth;[104] John Alexander, Eliezer Cogan, who became a tutor;[18] Timothy Kenrick under Ashworth and Robins, became a tutor under Belsham.[105] John Curwen, David Everard Ford, Edward Miall, John Deodatus Gregory Pike at Wymondley College.[106]
Nottingham 1680-(?). Edward Reynolds and John Whitlock. John Hardy (?Thomas; perhaps not the academy in Parker), about 1714 to 1727.[107] Caleb Fleming, John Brekell, John Johnson (Lambeth librarian) under Hardy.[107]
Sheriffhales 1663-1697 (closed before Woodhouse went to London).[108] John Woodhouse, assisted by Southwell. Robert Harley (?),[109] Henry St John (?),[110] Thomas Foley,[111] Thomas Hunt, Benjamin Bennet.[112][113]
Shrewsbury 1663-1730 (?). Francis Tallents (died 1708),[114] John Bryan (?) (died 1699), James Owen (died 1706), Samuel Benion, M.A. (died 1708), John Reynolds (died 1727), Dr Gyles (died 1730?). (Under Benion), Ebenezer Latham (tutor at Findern), etc.[87]
Stratford-on-Avon 1715 (?) at Gloucester. (?) John Alexander, who 1729 went to Dublin;[78] John Fleming, who had begun an academy at Bridgnorth (1726–1727), then went to Stratford.[77]
Sulby, near Welford, Northampton 1680-1688. John Shuttlewood.[115][116] Matthew Clarke the younger, Thomas Emlyn, Joshua Oldfield, and John Sheffield.[115][117]
Whitchurch[disambiguation needed ] 1668-1680 (?). J. Maulden (d. 1680).

North

Institution Dates Tutors Students
Attercliffe Academy 1691-1744. Timothy Jollie (died 1714), John De la Rose, J. Wadsworth (?). Nicholas Saunderson,[118] John Jennings of Kibworth Academy,[119] John Bowes and Thomas Secker,[120] Samuel Price, John Barker,[121] Thomas Bradbury,[122] Samuel Wright,[123] Benjamin Grosvenor,[124] William Harris,[125] Joseph Mottershead who then studied under Matthew Henry.[126]
Bolton 1723-1729. John Barclay, M.A.
Heckmondwyke, merged in Rotherham College. 1756 James Scott (d. 1783), Samuel Walker, etc. Walker then taught at Northowram, to 1795.[127] William Vint under Walker at Northowram.[128]
Kendal, set up after the death of Thomas Dixon (Whitehaven).[129] 1733-1752. Caleb Rotherham.[130] About 120 lay students in all; Jeremiah Dyson, George Walker;[130] Thomas and Benjamin Dawson;[131] Robert Andrews (translator), John Seddon.
Manchester.[132] 1698-1710 (?). John Chorlton (died 1705) transferred Rathmell Academy to Manchester after Frankland died,[133] countenanced by and promised support from the Lancashire ministers.; James Coningham, from 1700.[134] Samuel Bourn the younger,[134] James Clegg,[135] Thomas Dixon,[133][136] Thomas Holland.[100]
Rathmell Academy. Migratory (Natland, Kendal, Attercliffe by 1686, etc.). 1669-1698. Richard Frankland, assisted by John Issot. John Ashe,[137] Joshua Bayes,[138] John Chorlton,[133] James Clegg,[135] John Owen, Timothy Jollie (tutor at Attercliffe), John Evans;[39] Christopher Bassnett.[139]
Warrington 1700-1746. Charles Owen, D.D. (d. 1746).[15]
Warrington Academy 1757-1783. Library moved to Manchester New College, 1783; other removals, York (1803), Manchester, London, now represented by Harris Manchester College, Oxford. John Taylor, John Aikin, John Holt, Joseph Priestley, William Enfield, Nicholas Clayton,[140] etc.; at Manchester, Thomas Barnes,[141] George Walker, John Dalton, Ralph Harrison,[142] etc.; and at York, Charles Wellbeloved,[143] Hugh Kerr, M.A., etc.
Whitehaven, Moved to Bolton 1723-1729 (?). 1710-1723. Thomas Dixon, M.A., M.D.[136] John Taylor, George Benson, Caleb Rotherham,[144][130] Henry Winder.[145]

South

Institution Dates Tutors Students
Gosport[146] 1789-(?). David Bogue. In 1800 the Missionary Society placed their missionaries under Bogue for preparation.
Hungerford 1696-1701 (?). Benjamin Robinson, educated at Sheriffhales, first set up a school at Findern in 1693 but was opposed there (died 1724).[147]
Tubney, Berkshire. 1668-1679. Henry Langley (d. 1679).[148][149]

South-West

Institution Dates Tutors Students
Bridgwater (?)-1747 John Moore, M. A. (d. 1747).
Bristol. First Baptist Academy. 1720-(?). Bernard Foskett, continued the work of Ed. Terril and Caleb Tope. He was succeeded by Hugh Evans and his son Caleb Evans.[150] John Ash.[151]
Dartmouth 1668-1691. John Flavel. Only four.
Exeter (About) 1700-1722. Joseph Hallet, perhaps started in 1690.[152] Academy declined and was closed because of a subscription quarrel. James Foster,[153] John Fox.[154], Peter King, Zachariah Mudge.[152]
Exeter 1760-1786. Samuel Merivale,[155] Michaijah Towgood,[156] John Turner, John Hogg, Thomas Jervis.[63]
Exeter[3] 1799-1805. Timothy Kenrick,[105] Joseph Bretland.[157] James Hews Bransby.[158]
Gloucester 1696-(?). James Forbes (d. 1712).
Lyme Regis or Colyton, moved to Shepton Mallet and then to Poole. 1690 John Short, Matthew Towgood.
Ottery St Mary, started by Congregational Board, later represented by Bristol. Migratory (Bridport, Taunton, Exeter, Plymouth, Bristol).[159] 1752-(?) J. Lavington, James Rooker, Thomas Reader, James Small, etc.
Taunton 1672-1759 (when Amory went to London). Matthew Warren,[160] Robert Darch, Stephen James, Henry Grove,[40] Thomas Amory.[161] Henry Grove, John Shower under Warren;[160] Thomas and John Wright of Bristol, etc.
Tewkesbury Academy 1680 (Gloucester) to 1719, moved to Tewkesbury in 1712. Samuel Jones (d. 1719 or 1720), Jeremiah Jones his nephew.[162] Thomas Secker, Samuel Chandler, Joseph Butler. Daniel Scott.[163]
Tiverton (?)-(?). John Moor (d. 1740).[164]

Wales

Institution Dates Tutors Students
Broad Oak, Flintshire[165] 1690-1706. Philip Henry. After Henry's death, 1696, Benion continued teaching till in 1706, after death of James Owen,[166] he moved to Shrewsbury. Samuel Benion, who became a tutor. Ebenezer Latham studied under Benion, became a tutor at Caldwell, and later succeeded Hill at Findern.[87] Samuel Lawrence studied under Henry.[167]
Brynllywarch, Llangynwyd, near Bridgend, Glamorgan.[168] 1668-1697 (?). Samuel Jones. James Owen (tutor, Shrewsbury), Philip Pugh.[169]
Abergavenny. The Congregational Board withdrew their funding from Carmarthen Academy after an internal split, in 1756, and established one of their own. Migratory (Oswestry, Wrexham, Llanfyllin, Newton), Brecon College after 1839. The Baptist college founded 1807 is unconnected.[170] 1757-(?). David Jardine (died 1766),[171] Benjamin Davies, D.D. (died 1817),[172] John Griffiths,[173] Edward Williams merged in his own school and pressed for the 1782 move to Oswestry,[174] Jenkin Lewis, George Lewis, D.D. (died 1822), etc. Noah Simmons.[175]
Carmarthen (Presbyterian College, Carmarthen; Coleg Presbyteraidd Caerfyrddin). Migratory (Llwynllwyd, Haverford West, etc., Carmarthen, and probably continuation of Brynllwarch). 1700-after 1900. William Evans (died 1718),[176] Thomas Perrot (under whom were about 150 pupils) (died 1733),[177] Vavasor Griffiths, Evans Davis, Robert Gentleman (1779-1784).[178] George Vance Smith, principal 1876 to 1888, Walter Jenkin Evans principal 1888 to 1910.[179] Euros Bowen, David Davis, John Jenkins (Ifor Ceri), Thomas Rees, David Williams, David Williams (1709–1784).
Knill, Radnorshire[180] (?) 1675-(?). John Weaver. Samuel Jones, later tutor at Tewkesbury Academy.

Notes

  1. ^ Online at http://www.archive.org/details/dissentingacadem00parkiala
  2. ^ Surman Index: Ipswich Academy
  3. ^ a b c d e Not in Parker.
  4. ^  "Sayers, Frank". Dictionary of National Biography. London: Smith, Elder & Co. 1885–1900. 
  5. ^ Pupils mentioned in ODNB database. Gell is mentioned in the DNB biography of Weld.
  6. ^ Surman Index: Saffron Walden Academy
  7. ^ a b  "Guyse, John". Dictionary of National Biography. London: Smith, Elder & Co. 1885–1900. 
  8. ^ Surman Index: Wickhambrook Academy, Suffolk, Surman Index: Bishops Stortford College
  9. ^ Cradock, Samuel in Venn, J. & J. A., Alumni Cantabrigienses, Cambridge University Press, 10 vols, 1922–1958.  "Cradock, Samuel". Dictionary of National Biography. London: Smith, Elder & Co. 1885–1900. 
  10. ^ a b  "Calamy, Edmund (1671-1732)". Dictionary of National Biography. London: Smith, Elder & Co. 1885–1900.  The article contains extensive details of Calamy's schooling.
  11. ^  "Goodwin, Timothy". Dictionary of National Biography. London: Smith, Elder & Co. 1885–1900. 
  12. ^ Bishop's Hall Academy, Bethnal Green
  13. ^  "Brand, Thomas". Dictionary of National Biography. London: Smith, Elder & Co. 1885–1900. 
  14. ^ ODNB article on Owen, Charles.
  15. ^ a b  "Owen, Charles". Dictionary of National Biography. London: Smith, Elder & Co. 1885–1900. 
  16. ^  "Palmer, Samuel (d.1724)". Dictionary of National Biography. London: Smith, Elder & Co. 1885–1900. 
  17. ^ Surman Index: Cogan, Eliezer.
  18. ^ a b c  "Cogan, Eliezer". Dictionary of National Biography. London: Smith, Elder & Co. 1885–1900. 
  19. ^ Curthoys, M. C., "Gurney, Russell", on the website of the Oxford Dictionary of National Biography (Subscription or UK public library membership required), http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/ref:odnb/11774 
  20. ^  "Sharpe, Samuel". Dictionary of National Biography. London: Smith, Elder & Co. 1885–1900. 
  21. ^ http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=66624
  22. ^ Stowell is in the DNB.
  23. ^ Reynolds is in the DNB.
  24. ^ a b c d e  "Oldfield, Joshua". Dictionary of National Biography. London: Smith, Elder & Co. 1885–1900. 
  25. ^  "Lardner, Nathaniel". Dictionary of National Biography. London: Smith, Elder & Co. 1885–1900. 
  26. ^ As in Parker. Surman Index: Islington Academy, London (Thomas Doolittle), suggests may not be distinct from Islington (2).
  27. ^ Surman Index: Button, Ralph
  28. ^  "Button, Ralph". Dictionary of National Biography. London: Smith, Elder & Co. 1885–1900.  (It says Jekyll lived with Button in Islington.) ODNB says a nonconformist seminary in Islington.
  29. ^ a b  "Pomfret, Samuel". Dictionary of National Biography. London: Smith, Elder & Co. 1885–1900. 
  30. ^ Dolittle, Thomas in Venn, J. & J. A., Alumni Cantabrigienses, Cambridge University Press, 10 vols, 1922–1958.
  31. ^ a b c d e f  "Doolittle, Thomas". Dictionary of National Biography. London: Smith, Elder & Co. 1885–1900. 
  32. ^  "Vincent, Thomas". Dictionary of National Biography. London: Smith, Elder & Co. 1885–1900.  It mentions that he assisted Doolittle in Bunhill Fields.
  33. ^ a b  "Rowe, Thomas". Dictionary of National Biography. London: Smith, Elder & Co. 1885–1900. 
  34. ^  "Bury, Samuel". Dictionary of National Biography. London: Smith, Elder & Co. 1885–1900. 
  35. ^  "Emlyn, Thomas". Dictionary of National Biography. London: Smith, Elder & Co. 1885–1900. 
  36. ^ According to Parker, p. 63, this precursor of the Mill Hill School founded 1807 had some connection, if tenuous.
  37. ^ Surman Index, record for Swift
  38. ^ a b  "Gale, Theophilus". Dictionary of National Biography. London: Smith, Elder & Co. 1885–1900. 
  39. ^ a b  "Evans, John (1680?-1730)". Dictionary of National Biography. London: Smith, Elder & Co. 1885–1900. 
  40. ^ a b  "Grove, Henry". Dictionary of National Biography. London: Smith, Elder & Co. 1885–1900. 
  41. ^  "Say, Samuel". Dictionary of National Biography. London: Smith, Elder & Co. 1885–1900. 
  42. ^ May be William Wickins, thought by Calamy to be an Emmanuel graduate, ejected minister of 1662. Wickins, William in Venn, J. & J. A., Alumni Cantabrigienses, Cambridge University Press, 10 vols, 1922–1958.. Surman Index: Wickins, William identifies only where Wickins was a priest, gives dates 1614-1699.
  43. ^  "Lawrence, Samuel". Dictionary of National Biography. London: Smith, Elder & Co. 1885–1900. 
  44. ^  "Reynolds, Thomas (1667?-1727)". Dictionary of National Biography. London: Smith, Elder & Co. 1885–1900. 
  45. ^  "Morton, Charles (1627-1698)". Dictionary of National Biography. London: Smith, Elder & Co. 1885–1900. 
  46. ^ http://www.anglicanbooksrevitalized.us/Peter_Toons_Books_Online/History/hypercal1.htm
  47. ^ a b  "Wesley, Samuel (1662-1735)". Dictionary of National Biography. London: Smith, Elder & Co. 1885–1900. 
  48. ^ Surman Index: Jenkyn, William. Jenkyn not the father, could be William Jenkyn the younger.  "Jenkyn, William". Dictionary of National Biography. London: Smith, Elder & Co. 1885–1900. 
  49. ^  "Taylor, Abraham". Dictionary of National Biography. London: Smith, Elder & Co. 1885–1900. 
  50. ^  "Conder, John". Dictionary of National Biography. London: Smith, Elder & Co. 1885–1900. 
  51. ^  "Robinson, Robert (1727?-1791)". Dictionary of National Biography. London: Smith, Elder & Co. 1885–1900. 
  52. ^ a b Briggs, J. H. Y., "Conder, John", on the website of the Oxford Dictionary of National Biography (Subscription or UK public library membership required), http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/ref:odnb/6058 
  53. ^ a b  "Stafford, John (1728-1800)". Dictionary of National Biography. London: Smith, Elder & Co. 1885–1900. 
  54. ^  "Fell, John (1735-1797)". Dictionary of National Biography. London: Smith, Elder & Co. 1885–1900. 
  55. ^ a b c  "Pike, Samuel". Dictionary of National Biography. London: Smith, Elder & Co. 1885–1900. 
  56. ^ Surman Index: Wapping Academy (Edward Veal)
  57. ^  "Veel, Edward". Dictionary of National Biography. London: Smith, Elder & Co. 1885–1900. 
  58. ^  "Boyse, Joseph". Dictionary of National Biography. London: Smith, Elder & Co. 1885–1900. 
  59. ^  "Rogers, Timothy (1658-1728)". Dictionary of National Biography. London: Smith, Elder & Co. 1885–1900. 
  60. ^  "Savage, Samuel Morton". Dictionary of National Biography. London: Smith, Elder & Co. 1885–1900. 
  61. ^ All in DNB.
  62. ^  "Jennings, David". Dictionary of National Biography. London: Smith, Elder & Co. 1885–1900.  These five mentioned.
  63. ^ a b  "Jervis, Thomas". Dictionary of National Biography. London: Smith, Elder & Co. 1885–1900. 
  64. ^  "Furneaux, Philip". Dictionary of National Biography. London: Smith, Elder & Co. 1885–1900. 
  65. ^ Thomas Goodwin the younger.  "Goodwin, Thomas". Dictionary of National Biography. London: Smith, Elder & Co. 1885–1900. 
  66. ^  "Chauncy, Isaac". Dictionary of National Biography. London: Smith, Elder & Co. 1885–1900. 
  67. ^ Surman Index record for Ridgley
  68. ^  "Eames, John". Dictionary of National Biography. London: Smith, Elder & Co. 1885–1900. 
  69. ^ Densham is mentioned in the ODNB article on Eames.
  70. ^ Surman Index: Alcester Academy
  71. ^ Victoria County History: A History of the County of Warwick, pp.8-22 of Volume 3
  72. ^ http://dspace.dial.pipex.com/town/square/fk26/localpast/occpap/46biog/biogind.htm#p
  73. ^ Surman Index: Bedworth Academy
  74. ^ Surman Index: Saunders, Julius
  75. ^ Surman Index: Kirkpatrick, John (died 1750)
  76. ^ Surman Index: Bridgnorth Academy
  77. ^ a b Surman Index: Fleming, John (d. 1740)
  78. ^ a b  "Alexander, John (d.1743)". Dictionary of National Biography. London: Smith, Elder & Co. 1885–1900. 
  79. ^ Pickard is in the ODNB, an article that has a few facts about the academy.
  80. ^ Surman Index: Bromsgrove Academy
  81. ^  "Hickman, Henry". Dictionary of National Biography. London: Smith, Elder & Co. 1885–1900. 
  82. ^ Surman Index: Coventry Academy
  83. ^ Bryan, John in Venn, J. & J. A., Alumni Cantabrigienses, Cambridge University Press, 10 vols, 1922–1958..  "Bryan, John (d.1676)". Dictionary of National Biography. London: Smith, Elder & Co. 1885–1900. 
  84. ^ Surman Index: Shewell, Thomas
  85. ^  "Tong, William". Dictionary of National Biography. London: Smith, Elder & Co. 1885–1900. 
  86. ^ Hill, Thomas in Venn, J. & J. A., Alumni Cantabrigienses, Cambridge University Press, 10 vols, 1922–1958. (Tentative identification). The DNB includes Hill in the article about his father, Thomas Hill (1628?–1677?).
  87. ^ a b c ODNB article on Ebenezer Latham.
  88. ^ Disney is in the DNB.
  89. ^ Not in Barker. Surman Index: Addington, Stephen.
  90. ^ Surman Index: Mile End Academy
  91. ^  "Cole, Thomas (1627?-1697)". Dictionary of National Biography. London: Smith, Elder & Co. 1885–1900.  Cole, Thomas in Venn, J. & J. A., Alumni Cantabrigienses, Cambridge University Press, 10 vols, 1922–1958.
  92. ^ Records concerning those members of the Bull family, who are descendants of or connected with the Rev. William Bull (of Newport Pagnell) (1895).
  93. ^ a b  "Bull, William". Dictionary of National Biography. London: Smith, Elder & Co. 1885–1900. 
  94. ^  "Ashworth, Caleb". Dictionary of National Biography. London: Smith, Elder & Co. 1885–1900.  Surman Index: Ashworth, Caleb
  95. ^ Surman Index: Robins, Thomas
  96. ^ Surman Index: Horsey, John (1754-1827)
  97. ^ Surman Index: Parry, William (1754-1819)
  98. ^  "Mason, John (1706-1763)". Dictionary of National Biography. London: Smith, Elder & Co. 1885–1900. 
  99. ^  "Addington, Stephen". Dictionary of National Biography. London: Smith, Elder & Co. 1885–1900. 
  100. ^ a b  "Holland, Philip". Dictionary of National Biography. London: Smith, Elder & Co. 1885–1900. 
  101. ^  "Fawcett, Benjamin". Dictionary of National Biography. London: Smith, Elder & Co. 1885–1900. 
  102. ^  "Dyer, Samuel". Dictionary of National Biography. London: Smith, Elder & Co. 1885–1900. 
  103. ^ Dictionary of National Biography, Moore, Henry (1732–1802), unitarian minister and hymn-writer, by Alexander Gordon. Published 1894.
  104. ^  "Palmer, Samuel (1741-1813)". Dictionary of National Biography. London: Smith, Elder & Co. 1885–1900. 
  105. ^ a b  "Kenrick, Timothy". Dictionary of National Biography. London: Smith, Elder & Co. 1885–1900. 
  106. ^ Their ODNB articles
  107. ^ a b Wykes, David L., "Hardy, John", on the website of the Oxford Dictionary of National Biography (Subscription or UK public library membership required), http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/ref:odnb/74347 
  108. ^ Surman Index: Sheriffhales Academy
  109. ^ The ODNB says a dissenting academy run by Samuel Birch at Shilton, Oxfordshire, followed by a Huguenot academy in London.
  110. ^ The ODNB article on St John mentions that this time at Sheriffhales has been postulated, but says there is no evidence for this, nor for the suggestion he was educated at Eton College; see though final note here.
  111. ^ ODNB mentions Foley's education at Sheriffhales and Utrecht.
  112. ^  "Bennet, Benjamin". Dictionary of National Biography. London: Smith, Elder & Co. 1885–1900. 
  113. ^ The ODNB article on Woodhouse by David L. Wykes confirms the attendance of Robert Harley, Edward Harley (1664–1735), St John and Foley. It also mentions the future ministers Chewning Blackmore, John Newman, Benjamin Robinson, and Ferdinando Shaw. The ODNB articles on Matthew Clarke the younger, Thomas Hill, and Timothy Manlove give them as students at Sheriffhales.
  114. ^ Tallents was an ejected minister and a tutor, but the DNB and ODNB articles do not make clear that he had an academy, rather than individual pupils.
  115. ^ a b  "Shuttlewood, John". Dictionary of National Biography. London: Smith, Elder & Co. 1885–1900. 
  116. ^ Shuttlewoode, John in Venn, J. & J. A., Alumni Cantabrigienses, Cambridge University Press, 10 vols, 1922–1958.
  117. ^  "Sheffield, John (1654?-1726)". Dictionary of National Biography. London: Smith, Elder & Co. 1885–1900. 
  118. ^ ODNB mentions Attercliffe.
  119. ^ Jennings at Attercliffe is mentioned in ODNB.
  120. ^  "Jollie, Timothy". Dictionary of National Biography. London: Smith, Elder & Co. 1885–1900. 
  121. ^  "Barker, John (1682-1762)". Dictionary of National Biography. London: Smith, Elder & Co. 1885–1900. 
  122. ^  "Bradbury, Thomas". Dictionary of National Biography. London: Smith, Elder & Co. 1885–1900. 
  123. ^  "Wright, Samuel". Dictionary of National Biography. London: Smith, Elder & Co. 1885–1900. 
  124. ^  "Grosvenor, Benjamin". Dictionary of National Biography. London: Smith, Elder & Co. 1885–1900. 
  125. ^  "Harris, William (1675?-1740)". Dictionary of National Biography. London: Smith, Elder & Co. 1885–1900. 
  126. ^  "Mottershead, Joseph". Dictionary of National Biography. London: Smith, Elder & Co. 1885–1900. 
  127. ^ Surman Index: Walker, Samuel, Surman Index: http://surman.english.qmul.ac.uk/academyDisplay.php?masterid=581
  128. ^  "Vint, William". Dictionary of National Biography. London: Smith, Elder & Co. 1885–1900. 
  129. ^ Surman Index: Kendal Academy
  130. ^ a b c  "Rotheram, Caleb". Dictionary of National Biography. London: Smith, Elder & Co. 1885–1900. 
  131. ^ DNB article on Benjamin Dawson
  132. ^ Surman Index: Manchester Academy
  133. ^ a b c  "Chorlton, John". Dictionary of National Biography. London: Smith, Elder & Co. 1885–1900. 
  134. ^ a b  "Coningham, James". Dictionary of National Biography. London: Smith, Elder & Co. 1885–1900. 
  135. ^ a b  "Clegg, James". Dictionary of National Biography. London: Smith, Elder & Co. 1885–1900. 
  136. ^ a b  "Dixon, Thomas". Dictionary of National Biography. London: Smith, Elder & Co. 1885–1900. 
  137. ^  "Ashe, John". Dictionary of National Biography. London: Smith, Elder & Co. 1885–1900.  He went to Frankland's academy in 1688; the ODNB states that it was at that time in Attercliffe.
  138. ^  "Bayes, Joshua". Dictionary of National Biography. London: Smith, Elder & Co. 1885–1900.  He studied under Frankland in 1686, at Attercliffe.
  139. ^  "Bassnett, Christopher". Dictionary of National Biography. London: Smith, Elder & Co. 1885–1900. 
  140. ^  "Clayton, Nicholas". Dictionary of National Biography. London: Smith, Elder & Co. 1885–1900. 
  141. ^  "Barnes, Thomas (1747-1810)". Dictionary of National Biography. London: Smith, Elder & Co. 1885–1900. 
  142. ^  "Harrison, Ralph". Dictionary of National Biography. London: Smith, Elder & Co. 1885–1900. 
  143. ^  "Wellbeloved, Charles". Dictionary of National Biography. London: Smith, Elder & Co. 1885–1900. 
  144. ^ All in DNB.
  145. ^  "Winder, Henry". Dictionary of National Biography. London: Smith, Elder & Co. 1885–1900. 
  146. ^ Surman Index: Gosport Academy
  147. ^  "Robinson, Benjamin". Dictionary of National Biography. London: Smith, Elder & Co. 1885–1900. 
  148. ^ Langley is in the DNB.
  149. ^ Surman Index: Langley, Henry
  150. ^ Welsh Biography Online: Evans, Hugh
  151. ^ Smith, R. D., "Ash, John", on the website of the Oxford Dictionary of National Biography (Subscription or UK public library membership required), http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/ref:odnb/735 
  152. ^ a b  "Hallett, Joseph (1656-1722)". Dictionary of National Biography. London: Smith, Elder & Co. 1885–1900. 
  153. ^  "Foster, James". Dictionary of National Biography. London: Smith, Elder & Co. 1885–1900. 
  154. ^  "Fox, John (1693-1763)". Dictionary of National Biography. London: Smith, Elder & Co. 1885–1900. 
  155. ^  "Merivale, John Herman". Dictionary of National Biography. London: Smith, Elder & Co. 1885–1900. 
  156. ^ Son of Matthew Towgood.  "Towgood, Michaijah". Dictionary of National Biography. London: Smith, Elder & Co. 1885–1900. 
  157. ^ Bretland is in the DNB.
  158. ^ Bransby is in the DNB.
  159. ^ Surman Index: Ottery St Mary Academy, Devon
  160. ^ a b  "Warren, Matthew". Dictionary of National Biography. London: Smith, Elder & Co. 1885–1900. 
  161. ^  "Amory, Thomas (1701-1774)". Dictionary of National Biography. London: Smith, Elder & Co. 1885–1900. 
  162. ^ Jeremiah Jones is in the DNB.
  163. ^  "Scott, Daniel". Dictionary of National Biography. London: Smith, Elder & Co. 1885–1900. 
  164. ^ There was more than one John Moore tutoring in the area in the early 18th century; DNB article on Moore, John (1642?–1717).
  165. ^ Surman Index: Broad Oak Academy, Surman Index: Broad Oak Academy or Shrewsbury Academy
  166. ^  "Owen, James". Dictionary of National Biography. London: Smith, Elder & Co. 1885–1900. 
  167. ^ ODNB article on Lawrence.
  168. ^ Surman Index: Brynllywarch Academy
  169. ^ Pugh is in the DNB.
  170. ^ http://www.genuki.org.uk/big/wal/TheoColl.html
  171. ^ Welsh Biography Online: Jardine, David
  172. ^ Welsh Biography Online: Davies, Benjamin
  173. ^ Welsh Biography Online: Griffiths, John
  174. ^ Welsh Biography Online: Williams, Edward
  175. ^ Welsh Biography Online: Simmons, Joseph
  176. ^ Welsh Biography Online: Evans, William
  177. ^ Welsh Biography Online: Perrot, Thomas
  178. ^ Gentleman is in the DNB.
  179. ^ Smith is in the DNB.
  180. ^ Surman Index: Knill, Radnorshire (John Weaver)

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