Chesapeake (Amtrak)


Chesapeake (Amtrak)
Chesapeake
Overview
Service type Inter-city rail
Status Transferred to SEPTA and MTA
Locale Mid-Atlantic states
First service 1973(First version)
1978(Second and third versions)
Last service 1977(First version)
1995(Second and third versions)
Successor SEPTA
MARC Train
Former operator(s) Amtrak
Route
Start Washington, DC
End Philadelphia
Distance travelled 134 miles (216 km)
Average journey time 2 hour 18 minutes
Service frequency Monday through Friday
Train number(s) 182 & 187 (1973-1977)
420 & 421 (1978-1995)
On-board services
Class(es) Unreserved coach
Technical
Rolling stock Amfleet coaches
Gauge 4 ft 8 12 in (1,435 mm)
Electrification Overhead caternary
Track owner(s) Amtrak
Route map
Legend
Station
Head station
Philadelphia (SEPTA)
Stop on track
Chester
Stop on track
Wilmington
Stop on track
Newark, DE
Stop on track
Elkton
Stop on track
Perryville
Stop on track
Aberdeen
Stop on track
Edgewood
Stop on track
Baltimore Penn Station
Stop on track
Edmonson Avenue (Baltimore)
Stop on track
Baltimore Airport
Stop on track
Odenton
Stop on track
Bowie
Stop on track
Beltway-Lanham
End station
Washington, D.C. (METRO)

Chesapeake was a daily passenger train operated by Amtrak along the Northeast Corridor between Washington, D.C. and Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

The Chesapeake was originally established on April 29, 1973 as a train that ran between Washington, D.C. and New York City. This service ended on June 11, 1977, however on April 30, 1978, the name was revived for a commuter service that was financed through funding from the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania and the State of Maryland. Chester Transportation Center, which was closed by the Pennsylvania Railroad in either 1966 or 1967, was added to service in 1978[1] and the Baltimore-Washington International Airport railroad station was added to the service in 1980.[2]

On October 29, 1983, Maryland and Pennsylvania, along with a number of other Northeastern states, took control of its commuter railroads. SEPTA expanded to commuter railroads previously used by the Pennsylvania Railroad and Reading Railroad, and the "MARC" (Maryland Area Regional Commuter) service name was established.[3] The SEPTA R2 (now the Wilmington/Newark Line) and MARC Penn Line became the replacements for Amtrak's Chesapeake, although no service existed between Perryville and Newark. The name remained and service was extended not only back to New York City, but south into Richmond, Virginia until October 28, 1995 when it was replaced by the NortheastDirect.

Station stops (1978–1983)

The following station stops were made by Chesapeake trains; not all trains made all stops.

State City Station Notes and Connections
Pennsylvania Philadelphia 30th Street Station SEPTA subway service; SEPTA Regional Rail
Chester Chester Transportation Center SEPTA Wilmington/Newark Line
Delaware Wilmington French Street Station SEPTA Wilmington/Newark Line
Newark Newark Rail Station SEPTA Wilmington/Newark Line
Maryland Elkton Elkton
Perryville Perryville Now stop on Penn Line
Aberdeen Aberdeen Now stop on Penn Line
Edgewood Edgewood Now stop on Penn Line
Baltimore Pennsylvania Station Now stop on Penn Line and Baltimore Light Rail
Edmonson Avenue Station
Linthicum Baltimore Airport Now stop on Penn Line
Odenton Odenton Now stop on Penn Line
Bowie Bowie
New Carrollton Beltway-Lanham Station Metro Orange Line; now stop on Penn Line
Washington, D.C Union Station Metro Red Line; MARC; various Amtrak trains

References

External links


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