Charles Caryl Coleman


Charles Caryl Coleman
Women in the Wheat Fields, Anacapri (1887) was sold at a Christie’s auction in 2004 for $600,000.[1]
In the Shade of the Vines, Capri (1898)
The Villa Castello, Capri (1895)

Charles Caryl Coleman (1840, Buffalo, New York–1928, Capri, Italy) was an American-born Italian painter.[2]

Born and raised in Buffalo, New York, Coleman studied art under William Holbrook Beard "and an itinerant painter, Andrew Andrews whose real name was Isaacs." Between 1859 to 1862, Coleman studied in Paris under Thomas Couture, returning during the American Civil War to serve with the Union Army during which he was seriously wounded and recovered in New York City. He returned to Europe in 1866 with fellow painters William Morris Hunt and Elihu Vedder.[2]

After time in Paris and Brittany, he moved to a Roman apartment previously occupied by poet John Keats before finally settling in Capri.[2] He converted the former Santa Teresa convent into Villa Narcissus in 1870.[1] A part of that villa was dedicated to a "palace of art" with antiquities and his own paintings.[3] He remained in Capri until his death.

His work was exhibited in the United States and England.[2]

Works

  • A study of friend Elihu Vedder
  • Coleman was also commissioned to do a portrait of poet and essayist Walter Savage Landor.
  • "The Bronze Horses of San Marco, Venice" (1876, Whitney Museum of American Art).
  • "Vesuvius from Pompeii" (date unknown, Detroit Institute of Arts)
  • "The Vesuvius Eruption of 1906" (date unknown, Brooklyn Museum)
  • Mural designs for the Church of St. Ignatius Loyola, New York City for the Ecclesiastical Department of the Tiffany Glass and Decorating Company.[4]

References


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