3rd Infantry Division (United States)


3rd Infantry Division (United States)

Infobox Military Unit
unit_name=3rd Infantry Division


caption=3rd Infantry Division shoulder sleeve insignia
country=USA
allegiance=
type=Division
branch=Regular Army
dates=November 21, 1917 - Present
specialization=Heavy
command_structure=Forces Command
size=
current_commander=Major General Rick Lynch
garrison=Fort Stewart
ceremonial_chief=
nickname=Rock Of The Marne
motto="Nous Resterons Là"
"We Shall Remain"
colors=Blue and WhiteBrown and Gold
march=
mascot=
battles=World War I
World War II
* North African campaign
* Italian Campaign
* Western Front 1944 - 1945
Korean War
Gulf War
Iraq Campaign
notable_commanders= MG Joseph T. Dickman
MG John P. Lucas
MG Lucian Truscott
Lt. Gen John W. O'Daniel
anniversaries=
identification_symbol=
identification_symbol_label=3rd ID Distinctive Unit Insignia
US Infantry
previous=2nd Infantry Division
next=4th Infantry Division
The 3rd Infantry Division —nicknamed the Rock of the Marne— is a United States Army infantry division based at Fort Stewart, Georgia. It is a direct subordinate unit of the U.S. Army Forces Command, and boasts a storied history of service in World War I in France, World War II in Italy, and Iraq. The 3rd Infantry Division was the first conventional US unit to enter Baghdad in 2003, and the first Division to serve three tours in Iraq. Its current organization includes four brigade combat teams, one aviation brigade, and support elements.

History

The 3rd Infantry Division has one of the most successful combat records of any U.S. Army division. It has paid a high price for this distinction, suffering more than 50,000 wartime casualties. Fifty-one members of the 3rd Infantry Division were awarded the Medal of Honor while serving the United States Army.

World War I

Commanders

#MG Joseph T. Dickman (28 November 1917)
#BG J. A. Irons (11 February 1918)
#MG Joseph T. Dickman (13 February 1918)
#BG J. A. Irons (27 February 1918)
#BG Charles Crawford (8 March 1918)
#BG J. A. Irons (10 March 1918)
#BG Charles Crawford (19 March 1918)
#MG Joseph T. Dickman (12 April 1918)
#BG F. W. Sladen (18 August- 1918)
#MG Beaumond B. Buck (27 August 1918)
#BG Preston Brown (18 October 1918)
#MG Robert L. Howze (19 November 1918).

command structure
name= 3rd Infantry Division
date=World War I
parent=
subordinate=
5th Infantry Brigade:4th Infantry Regiment:7th Infantry Regiment:8th Machine Gun Battalion
6th Infantry Brigade:30th Infantry Regiment:38th Infantry Regiment:9th Machine Gun Battalion
3d Field Artillery Brigade:10th Field Artillery Regiment (75):18th Field Artillery Regiment (155):76th Field Artillery Regiment (75):3d Trench Mortar BatteryDivisional Troops:7th Machine Gun Battalion:6th Engineers:5th Field Signal Battalion
Headquarters TroopTrains:3d Train Headquarters and Military Police:3d Ammunition Train:3d Supply Train:6th Engineer Train:3d Sanitary Train::5th Field Hospital::7th Field Hospital::26th Field Hospital::27th Field Hospital

Activated in November 1917 during World War I at Camp Greene, North Carolina. It went into combat for the first time eight months later in France. At midnight on July 14 1918, the Division earned lasting distinction. Engaged in the Aisne-Marne Offensive as a member of the American Expeditionary Force to Europe, the Division was protecting Paris with a position on the banks of the Marne River. While surrounding units retreated, the 3rd Infantry Division remained rock solid and earned its reputation as the "Rock of the Marne".Fact|date=January 2008 Although the stand was highly successful, a steep price was paid. General "Black Jack" Pershing said the Division's performance one of the most brilliant of the United States' military history. During the war two members of the division were awarded the Medal of Honor.

Nickname

By May of 1918 the French had been pushed back to within 50 miles of Paris. The 7th Machine Gun Battalion of the 3rd Division rushed to Chateau-Thierry amid retreating French troops and held the Germans back at the Marne River. The rest of the division was absorbed by the French Command until brought back together under the Command of Gen. Joseph Dickman and by July 15, 1918 they took the brunt of what was to be the last German offensive of the war.

As units on either side of the division were driven back, men of the 30th and 38th Infantry Regiments held their positions at the Marne River, defeating the German bid for Paris. For this the division earned the nickname, “Rock of the Marne".

World War II

Commanders

#MG Charles F. Thompson (July 1940-August 1941)
#BG Charles P. Hall (August 1941-September 1941)
#MG John P. Lucas (September 1941-March 1942)
#MG Jonathan W. Anderson (March 1942-March 1943)
#MG Lucian K. Truscott, Jr. (March 1943-February 1944)
#MG John W. O'Daniel (February 1944-December 1945)
#MG William R. Schmidt (July 1945-August 1946),

command structure
name= 3rd Infantry Division
date= (1941)
parent=
subordinate=
* HQ, 3rd Division
* Headquarters & Military Police Company
** 7th Infantry Regiment
** 15th Infantry Regiment
** 30th Infantry Regiment
** 10th Engineer Battalion
** 3rd Medical Battalion
** 3rd Quartermaster Battalion
** 3rd Reconnaissance Troop
** 3rd Signal Company
*HHB, 3rd Division Artillery
** 9th Field Artillery Battalion (155 mm)
** 10th Field Artillery Battalion (105 mm)
** 39th Field Artillery Battalion (105 mm)
** 41st Field Artillery Battalion (105 mm)
**3rd Antitank Battalion (Provisional)

command structure
name= 3rd Infantry Division
date= 1944-1945
parent=
subordinate=
* Headquarters Special Troops
** Headquarters Company, 3rd Infantry Division
** U.S. 7th Infantry Regiment
** 15th Infantry Regiment
** 30th Infantry Regiment
** 10th Engineer Battalion (Combat)
** 3rd Medical Battalion
** 3rd Counter Intelligence Corps Detachment
** 3rd Quartermaster Company
** 703rd Ordnance Company (Light Maint)
** 3rd Reconnaissance Troop (Mechanized)
** 3rd Signal Company
** 3rd Military Police Platoon

*HHB, 3rd Division Artillery
** 9th Field Artillery Battalion (155 mm)
** 10th Field Artillery Battalion (105 mm)
** 39th Field Artillery Battalion (105 mm)
** 41st Field Artillery Battalion (105 mm)

* Attachments
** 441st AntiAircraft Artillery Battalion (Auto Weapons) (1944-07-13-1945-06-29)
** 601st Tank Destroyer Battalion (1944-07-13-1945-07-01)
** 756th Tank Battalion (1944-07-13-1945-07-01)

command structure
name= 3rd Infantry Division
date= World War II
parent=
# US Western Task Force 1942-11-08
# US I Armored Corps 1943-02-01
# US Provisional Corps, US Seventh Army 1943-07-15
# US II Corps 1943-07-31
# US VI Corps 1943-08-13
# US II Corps 1943-11-18
# US VI Corps 1943-12-27
# US II Corps 1944-05-29
# US Fifth Army 1944-06-05
# AFHQ, but attached to US Seventh Army and SOS, NATOUSA for supply 1944-07-01
# AFHQ, but attached to the US VI Corps, US Seventh Army 1944-07-13
# US VI Corps 1944-07-15
# US VI Corps, US Seventh Army, 6th Army Group 1944-09-15
# US Seventh Army, 6th Army Group but "attached to the French II Corps of the French First Army" 1944-12-15
# US XXI Corps, US Seventh Army, 6th Army Group, but "attached to French First Army" 1945-01-28
# US Seventh Army, 6th Army Group, but "attached to the French II Corps of the French First Army" 1945-02-15
# US Seventh Army, 6th Army Group, but "attached to the French II Corps" 1945-02-18
# US XV Corps, US Seventh Army, 6th Army Group 1945-03-12
# US XXI Corps, US Seventh Army, 6th Army Group 1945-04-23
# US XV Corps 1945-04-28
# US Seventh Army, 6th Army Group 1945-04-30
# US Seventh Army, 6th Army Group 1945-05-06
# US XV Corps, US Seventh Army, 6th Army Group 1945-05-08

Narrative

*The 3rd Division is one of the only American Divisions which fought the Axis on all European fronts.
*The Division first saw action in the North African invasion, landing at Fedala, November 8, 1942, and capturing half of French Morocco.
*On July 10, 1943, the Division made an assault landing on Sicily, fought its way into Palermo before the armor could get there, and raced on to capture Messina, thus ending the Sicilian campaign.
*Nine days after the Italian invasion, September 18, 1943, the 3rd landed at Salerno and in intensive action drove to and across the Volturno and to Cassino. After a brief rest, the Division was ordered to hit the beaches at Anzio, January 22, 1944, where for four months it maintained its toe-hold against furious German counterattacks. On February 29, 1944, the 3rd fought off an attack by three German Divisions. In May the Division broke out of the beachhead and drove on to Rome, and then went into training for the invasion of Southern France.
*On August 15, 1944, another D-day, the Division landed at St. Tropez, advanced up the Rhone Valley, through the Vosges Mountains, and reached the Rhine at Strasbourg, November 26November 27, 1944. After maintaining defensive positions it took part in clearing the Colmar Pocket, 23 January 18 February 1945, and on 15 March struck against Siegfried Line positions south of Zweibrucken. The Division smashed through the defenses and crossed the Rhine, March 26, 1945 ; then drove on to take Nurnberg in a fierce battle, capturing the city in block-by-block fighting, 17-20 April. The 3rd pushed on to take Augsburg and Munich, 27-30 April, and was in the vicinity of Salzburg when the war in Europe ended.
*The 3rd Division suffered more combat deaths in World War II than any other U.S. division, and the third highest among modern U.S. Divisions, behind only the 2nd Infantry Division in the Korean War and the 1st Cavalry Division in the Vietnam War.Fact|date=January 2008

Korean War

During the Korean War, the Division, was known as the "Fire Brigade" for its rapid response to crisis. It received ten Battle Stars. Eleven more MOH recipients were added to the division's list of heroes during the Korean War. Eight were from the |7th Infantry Regiment, Jerry K. Crump (September 6 and September 7, 1951), John Essebagger, Jr. (April 25, 1951), Charles L. Gilliland (April 25, 1951), Clair Goodblood (April 24 and April 25, 1951), Noah O. Knight (November 23 and November 24, 1951), Darwin K. Kyle (February 16, 1951), Leroy A. Mendonca (July 4, 1951), and Hiroshi H. Miyamura (April 24 and April 25, 1951). Three more recipients were with the 15th Infantry Regiment, Emory L. Bennett (June 24, 1951), Ola L. Mize (June 10 and June 11, 1953) and Charles F. Pendleton (July 16 and July 17, 1953).

1958 through 2000

From April 1958 to April 1996, the Marne Division was stationed in West Germany from near the Czech border westward throughout various towns in Bavaria including Bamberg and Aschaffenburg. In August 1961, a few days after the Berlin Wall was erected, a reinforced company from the 7th Infantry Regiment (a unit of the 3rd Infantry Division) in full battle gear, was ordered to travel along the Autobahn (a major highway) from Aschaffenburg in Bavaria to West Berlin. This was to assert the right of US forces to travel unhindered from West Germany across the western part of East Germany to West Berlin. After the Berlin Wall was built, it was not known if the East German forces would attempt to impede or restrict the movement of US troops when crossing East Germany while trying to reach West Berlin. The unit arrived in West Berlin without incident confirming the right of free passage.

In November 1990, soldiers of the 3rd Infantry Division were once again called into action. Following Iraq's invasion of Kuwait, more than 6,000 Marne men and women deployed with the 1st Armored Division on Operation Desert Storm as part of the Allied Coalition. Later nearly 1,000 soldiers deployed to southeastern Turkey and northern Iraq to provide comfort to Kurdish refugees. Another group of nearly 1,000 were part of Task Force Victory rebuilding Kuwait.

As part of the Army's reduction to a ten-division force, the 24th Infantry Division was inactivated on 15 February 1996, and reflagged to become the 3rd Infantry Division.

In 1996 the division was restationed at Fort Stewart, Fort Benning, and Hunter Army Airfield, Georgia. The division repeatedly demonstrated its deployability since then by maintaining a battalion, and later a brigade task force presence in Kuwait. It has also moved sizeable forces to Egypt, Bosnia and Kosovo in partnership training and peacekeeping missions.

In 1996-97, the 3rd Infantry Division Detachment, Rear Tactical Operations Center (RTOC), which is a unit manned by the Georgia Army National Guard was mobilized and served in Operation Joint Endeavor. During this time, the 3rd ID RTOC served under the 1st Infantry Division and later the 1st Armored Division. Respectively serving in Bosnia, at Camps Dallas and Angela, near Tuzla under the 1ID, and then in Croatia at Slavonski Brod, under the 1AD, serving the Assistant Division Commander for Support, then BG George Casey.

Global War on Terror

Commanders

#MG Buford "Buff" Blount
#MG William Grant Webster
#MG Rick Lynch
#MG Tony Cucolo

Narrative

Since September 11, 2001 units have been sent to Afghanistan, Pakistan and other Middle Eastern countries to support the designated "War on Terrorism".

Early in 2003 the deployability and fighting capability of the Marne Division was highly visible worldwide when the entire division deployed in weeks to Kuwait. It was called on subsequently to spearhead Coalition forces in Operation Iraqi Freedom, fighting its way to Baghdad in early April, leading to the end of the Saddam Hussein government. The First Brigade captured and secured the Baghdad International Airport, which also resulted in the Division's first Medal of Honor since the Korean War, awarded to SFC Paul Ray Smith. Second Brigade, Third Infantry division made the much-publicized "Thunder Run" into downtown Baghdad. The Second Brigade was redeployed to Fallujah, Iraq during the summer of 2003. The division returned to the United States in August, 2003. Beginning in 2004, the 3rd began re-organizing. The division shifted from three maneuver brigades to four "units of action," which are essentially smaller brigade formations, with one infantry, one armor, one cavalry, and one artillery battalion in each. The former Engineer Brigade became the 4rd Brigade at Fort Stewart. Each of these units of action engaged in several mock battles at the National Training Center (NTC) and Joint Readiness Training Center (JRTC), and preparation for a second deployment to Iraq.

In January 2005, the Third Infantry Division became the first Army Division to serve a second tour in Iraq. The division headquarters took control of the Multi-National Division Baghdad, MND-B, headquartered at Camp Liberty and with responsibility for the greater Baghdad area. First and Third Brigades of the Third Infantry Division were placed under control of the 42nd Infantry Division, and later under the 101st Airborne Division, in MND-North. In preparation of this deployment a Fourth Brigade was organized and became the first cohesive "Brigade Combat Team" sent into a combat zone by the US Army, cohesive in that it fulfilled the Table of Organization requirement of such a unit. The California Army National Guard's 1st Battalion 184 Infantry served as one of the brigade's two infantry battalions, as well as the detachment from the Hawaii Army National Guard's 29th BCT, the 2/299th Infantry. Both served in the Baghdad area of operations. The 48th BCT was also attached to the third infantry division covering southern Baghdad and its surroundings during the 2005 rotation.

The Division redeployed to Fort Stewart and Fort Benning in January 2006. On November 17, 2006, the Army announced that the Third Infantry Division is scheduled to return to Iraq in 2007 and thus become the first Army division to serve three tours in Iraq. The division headquarters became the leadership organization of MND-C (Multi-National Division Central), a new command established south of Baghdad as part of the 2007 troop surge.

Current Structure

3rd Infantry Division
* Division Special Troops Battalion
* 1st Brigade Combat Team "Raider"
** 1st Brigade Special Troops Battalion "Desert Cat"
** 5th Squadron, 7th Cavalry Regiment (RSTA) "Warpaint"
** 3rd Battalion, 69th Armor Regiment "Speed & Power"
** 2nd Battalion, 7th Infantry Regiment "Cottonbalers"
** 1st Battalion, 41st Field Artillery Regiment "Glory Guns"
** 3rd Brigade Support Battalion "Ready"
* 2nd Brigade Combat Team "Spartan"
** 2nd Brigade Special Troops Battalion "Titan"
** 3rd Squadron, 7th Cavalry Regiment "Saber"
** 1st Battalion, 64th Armor Regiment "Desert Rogue"
** 1st Battalion, 30th Infantry Regiment "Battleboar"
** 1st Battalion, 9th Field Artillery Regiment "Battleking"
** 26th Brigade Support Battalion "Challenger"
* 3rd Brigade Combat Team "Sledgehammer"
** 3rd Brigade Special Troops Battalion "Buffalo"
** 3rd Squadron, 1st Cavalry Regiment "Blackhawk"
** 2nd Battalion, 69th Armor Regiment "Panther"
** 3rd Battalion, 15th Infantry Regiment
** 1st Battalion, 10th Field Artillery Regiment "Rock"
** 203rd Brigade Support Battalion "Eagle"
* 4th Brigade Combat Team "Vanguard"
** 4th Brigade Special Troops Battalion "Sentinel"
** 6th Squadron, 8th Cavalry Regiment "Mustang"
** 4th Battalion, 64th Armor Regiment "Tusker"
** 3rd Battalion, 7th Infantry Regiment "Baler"
** 1st Battalion, 76th Field Artillery Regiment "Patriot"
** 703rd Brigade Support Battalion "Maintain"
* Combat Aviation Brigade, 3rd Infantry Division
** Headquarters and Headquarters Company
** 1st (Attack) Battalion, 3rd Aviation Regiment (AH-64D/AH-64DW), "Viper"
** 2nd (General Support) Battalion, 3rd Aviation Regiment (UH-60A/UH-60L/CH-47), "Knighthawk"
** 3nd (Attack) Battalion, 3rd Aviation Regiment (AH-64D), "Tigershark"
** 4th (Assault) Battalion, 3rd Aviation Regiment (UH-60L), "Marne Assault"
** 603rd Aviation Support Battalion

Division Combat Casualties

*World War I
# 3,177 Killed in Action
# 12,940 Wounded in Action
*World War II
# 4,922 Killed in Action
# 18,766 Wounded in Action
# 636 Died of Wounds
*Korean War
# 2,160 Killed in Action
# 7,939 Wounded in Action
*Operation Iraqi Freedom

Division lineage

*Constituted 12 November 1917 in the Regular Army as Headquarters, 3rd Division
*Organized 21 November 1917 at Camp Greene, North Carolina
*Redesignated 1 August 1942 as Headquarters, 3rd Infantry Division
*Reorganized and redesignated 1 April 1960 as Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 3rd Infantry Division

Division honors

Campaign participation credit

*World War I:
# Aisne
# Champagne-Marne
# Aisne-Marne
# St. Mihiel
# Meuse-Argonne
# Champagne 1918

*World War II:
# Algeria-French
# Morocco (with arrowhead)
# Tunisia
# Sicily (with arrowhead)
# Naples-Foggia
# Anzio (with arrowhead)
# Rome-Arno
# Southern France (with arrowhead)
# Rhineland
# Ardennes-Alsace
# Central Europe

*Korean War:
# CCF Intervention
# First UN Counteroffensive
# CCF Spring Offensive
# UN Summer-Fall Offensive
# Second Korean Winter
# Korea, Summer-Fall 1952
# Third Korean Winter
# Korea, Summer 1953

Decorations

#Presidential Unit Citation (Army) for COLMAR
#French Croix de Guerre with Palm, World War II for COLMAR
#French Croix de Guerre, World War II, Fourragere
#Republic of Korea Presidential Unit Citation for UIJONGBU CORRIDOR
#Republic of Korea Presidential Unit Citation for IRON TRIANGLE
#Chryssoun Aristion Andrias (Bravery Gold Medal of Greece) for KOREA
#Presidential Unit Citation (Army) for OIF I

Division artillery lineage

*Constituted 12 November 1917 in the Regular Army as Headquarters, 3rd Field Artillery Brigade, and assigned to the 3rd Division
*Organized 26 November 1917 at Camp Stanley, Texas
*Disbanded 16 October 1939 at Fort Lewis, Washington
*Reconstituted 1 October 1940 in the Regular Army as Headquarters and Headquarters Battery, 3rd Division Artillery, and activated at Fort Lewis, Washington
*Redesignated 1 July 1957 as Headquarters and Headquarters Battery, 3rd Infantry Division Artillery

Division artillery honors

Campaign participation credit

*World War I:

# Champagne-Marne;
# Aisne-Marne;
# St. Mihiel;
# Meuse-Argonne;
# Champagne 1918

*World War II:

# Tunisia;
# Sicily (with arrowhead);
# Naples-Foggia;
# Anzio (with arrowhead);
# Rome-Arno;
# Southern France (with arrowhead);
# Rhineland;
# Ardennes-Alsace;
# Central Europe

*Korean War:

# CCF Intervention;
# First UN Counteroffensive;
# CCF Spring Offensive;
# UN Summer-Fall Offensive;
# Second Korean Winter;
# Korea, Summer-Fall 1952;
# Third Korean Winter;
# Korea, Summer 1953

Decorations

*Presidential Unit Citation (Army) for COLMAR
*French Croix de Guerre with Palm for COLMAR
*French Croix de Guerre, World War II, Fourragere
*Republic of Korea Presidential Unit Citation for UIJONGBU CORRIDOR
*Republic of Korea Presidential Unit Citation for IRON TRIANGLE
*Chryssoun Aristion Andrias (Bravery Gold Medal of Greece) for KOREA
#Presidential Unit Citation (Army) for OIF I

Aviation Brigade, 3rd Infantry Division Lineage

*Constituted 16 March 1985 in the Regular Army as Headquarters and Headquarters Company, Aviation Brigade, 3rd Infantry Division, and activated in Germany

Aviation Brigade, 3rd Infantry Division Honors

Campaign participation credit

Operation Desert ShieldOperation Desert StormOperation Iraqi Freedom IOperation Iraqi Freedom IIIOperarion Iraqi Freedom V

Decorations

*None

3rd Infantry Division Band lineage

*Constituted 20 August 1943 in the Regular Army as the Band, 3rd Infantry Division
*Redesignated 1 December 1943 as the 3rd Infantry Division Band and activated in North Africa
*Consolidated 20 March 1963 with Headquarters and Headquarters Detachment, 3rd Infantry Division Trains, and consolidated unit reorganized and redesignated as Headquarters, Headquarters and Band, 3rd Infantry Division Support Command.
*Reorganized and redesignated 15 March 1968 as Headquarters, Headquarters Company and Band, 3rd Infantry Division Support Command.
*Band element withdrawn 21 May 1972 from Headquarters, Headquarters Company and Band, 3rd Infantry Division Support Command, and absorbed by the 3rd Adjutant General Company
*Band element withdrawn 1 October 1984 from the 3rd Adjutant General Company and redesignated as the 3rd Infantry Division Band.

3rd Infantry Division Band honors

Campaign participation credit

*World War II - EAME:
# Tunisia
# Sicily (with arrowhead)
# Naples-Foggia
# Anzio (with arrowhead)
# Rome-Arno
# Southern France (with arrowhead)
# Rhineland
# Ardennes-Alsace
# Central Europe

*Korean War:
# CCF Intervention
# First UN Counteroffensive
# CCF Spring Offensive
# UN Summer-Fall Offensive
# Second Korean Winter
# Korea, Summer-Fall 1952
# Third Korean Winter
# Korea, Summer 1953

*Global War on Terror:
# Global War on Terrorism
# Iraq Campaign

Decorations

#Presidential Unit Citation (Army) for COLMAR
#Meritorious Unit Commendation (Army) for KOREA 1951-1952
#French Croix de Guerre with Palm, World War II for COLMAR
#French Croix de Guerre, World War II, Fourragere
#Republic of Korea Presidential Unit Citation for UIJONGBU CORRIDOR
#Republic of Korea Presidential Unit Citation for IRON TRIANGLE
#Chryssoun Aristeion Andreias (Bravery Gold Medal of Greece) for KOREA

Deployment of 1st Brigade Combat Team on American soil

In October 1, 2008, the 3rd Infantry Division’s 1st Brigade Combat Team was redeployed for 12 months on what is expected will be a permanent mission to respond to the threat of terrorist attacks on American soil and perform crowd control of unruly American citizens in the case of civil unrest. The force was renamed CBRNE Consequence Management Response Force and is now under the the daily control of United States Northern Command's Army North, whose mission is to protect the United States homeland and support local, state, and federal authorities. [http://www.armytimes.com/news/2008/09/army_homeland_090708w/]

On October 4, 2008, political consultant Naomi Wolf issued a statement on KEXP 90.3 FM Seattle, arguing that this, along with the threats of martial law reported by Brad Sherman, was in fact part of a coup d'état which has taken place in the United States. She called for the immediate arrest of George W. Bush. [http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_XgkeTanCGI] [http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HaG9d_4zij8]

Notable members of the 3rd Infantry Division

* Audie Murphy
* Major General Lucian Truscott
* Major General Keith L. Ware
* Chief Master Sergeant of the Air Force Richard Kisling
* Sgt. Shawn Gibson
* SFC Paul Smith
* PFC Jose F. Valdez
* PFC James Arness
* Sergeant First Class Agustin Ramos Calero
* PFC Emory L. Bennett
* Sergeant Sylvester Antolak
* SPC-4 Thomas John Fonville
* Lieutenant General Edward H. Brooks

ee also

*"Dogface"
*""
*""
*"Over There" - A drama series centering on the 3rd Infantry Division.
*"
*"256th Infantry Brigade

External links

* [http://www.taskforcemountain.com 4th Brigade Combat Team, 3rd Infantry Division in Iraq]
* [http://www.stewart.army.mil/3DIDWeb/Homepage/3idhome.asp 3rd Infantry Division Home Page] - official site.
* [http://www.3rdiv.org Society of the 3d Infantry Division]
* [http://www.dogfacesoldiers.org Photographic Journey: Anzio to Austria]
* [http://www.warfoto.com Sgt. William Heller's World War II Memoirs-3rd Infantry Division]
* [http://www.globalsecurity.org/military/agency/army/3id.htm GlobalSecurity.org: 3d Infantry Division]
* [http://www.lonesentry.com/gi_stories_booklets/3rdinfantry/ Blue and White Devils: The Story of the 3d Infantry Division (WWII unit history booklet)]
* [http://www.virtualwall.org/dw/WareKL01a.htm/ Virtualwall.org] - Medal of Honor Citation for MG Keith L. Ware

References

Bibliography

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# Kittler, Glenn D. "From Chateau-Thierry to Anzio to Wonson; The Fighting Third." SAGA: True Adventures for Men 8 (September 1954):10-13ff.
# Lacey, Jim. The Third Infantry Division's Twenty-One Day Assault on Baghdad. US Naval Institute Press: 2007.
# Lamb, David S. Till We Meet Again. Cleveland: Stevens Publishing Co., 1944.
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