Hagiography


Hagiography

Hagiography (play /ˌhæɡiˈɒɡrəfi/) is the study of saints.

From the Greek (h)ağios (ἅγιος, "holy" or "saint") and graphēin (γράφειν, "to write"), it refers literally to writings on the subject of such holy people, and specifically to the biographies of saints and ecclesiastical leaders. The term hagiology, the study of hagiography, is also current in English, though less common. This, in fact, follows original Greek practice, where ἁγιογραφία refers to visual images of the saints, while their written lives (βίοι or vitæ) or the study thereof are known as ἁγιολογία.

Christian hagiographies focus on the lives, and notably the miracles of men and women canonized by the Roman Catholic church, the Anglican Communion, the Eastern Orthodox Church, the Oriental Orthodox Church, and the Church of the East. Other religions such as Buddhism and Islam also create and maintain hagiographical texts concerning saints and other individuals believed to be imbued with the sacred.

The term "hagiographic" has also been used as a pejorative reference to the works of biographers and historians perceived to be uncritical or "reverential" to their subject. Nonetheless, hagiographic works, particularly those of the Middle Ages, can often incorporate a valuable record of institutional and local history, and evidence of popular cults, customs and traditions.[1]

Contents

Development

Hagiography constituted an important literary genre in the early Christian church, providing some informational history along with the more inspirational stories and legend. A hagiographic account of an individual saint can constitute a vita or biography, a description of the saint's deeds and/or miracles, or an account of the saint's martyrdom (a passio) - or be a combination of these.

The genre of lives of the saints first came into being in the Roman Empire as legends about Christian martyrs were recorded. The dates of their deaths formed the basis of martyrologies. In the 4th century, there were three main types of catalogs of lives of the saints:

  • annual calendar catalogue, or menaion (in Greek, menaios means "month") (biographies of the saints to be read at sermons);
  • synaxarion, or a short version of lives of the saints, arranged by dates;
  • paterikon (in Latin, pater means "father"), or biography of the specific saints, chosen by the catalog compiler.

In Western Europe hagiography was one of the more important vehicles for the study of inspirational history during the Middle Ages. The Golden Legend of Jacob de Voragine compiled a great deal of mediæval hagiographic material, with a strong emphasis on miracle tales. Lives were often written to promote the cult of local or national states, and in particular to develop pilgrimages to visit relics. The bronze Gniezno Doors of Gniezno Cathedral in Poland are the only Romanesque doors in Europe to feature the life of a saint. The life of Saint Adalbert[disambiguation needed ], who is buried in the cathedral, is shown in 18 scenes, probably based on a lost illuminated copy of one of his Lives.

The Bollandist Society continues the study, academic assembly, appraisal and publication of materials relating to the lives of Christian saints. (See Acta Sanctorum.)

The mediæval period in England

With the introduction of Latin literature into England in the 7th and 8th centuries the genre of the life of the saint grew increasingly popular. It is not surprising that such a genre would become popular in England. When one contrasts it to the popular heroic poem, such as Beowulf, one finds that they share certain common features. In Beowulf, the titular character battles against Grendel and his mother, while the saint, such as Athanasius’ Anthony (one of the original sources for the hagiographic motif) or the character of Guthlac, battles against figures no less substantial in a spiritual sense. Both genres then focus on the hero-warrior figure, but with the distinction that the saint is of a spiritual sort.

In Anglo-Saxon and mediæval England, Hagiography became a literary genre par excellence for the teaching of a largely illiterate audience. Hagiography provided priests and theologians with the classical handbooks in a form that allowed them the rhetorical tools necessary to defend the truth of their scriptures. Many of the important hagiographical texts composed in medieval England were written in the dialect of Anglo-Norman.

Of all the English hagiographers no one was more prolific nor so aware of the importance of the genre as Abbot Ælfric of Eynsham. His work The Lives of the Saints (MS Cotton Julius E.7) comprises a set of sermons on saints' days, formerly observed by the English Church. The text comprises two prefaces, one in Latin and one in Old English, and 39 lives beginning on December 25 with the nativity of Christ and ending with three texts to which no saints' days are attached. The text spans the entire year and describes the lives of many saints, both English and continental, and hearkens back to some of the earliest saints of the early church.

Imitation of the life of Christ then was the benchmark against which saints were measured, and imitation of the lives of saints was the benchmark against which the general population measured itself.

There are two known instances where saint's lives were adapted into vernacular plays in Britain. These are the Cornish-language works Beunans Meriasek and Beunans Ke, about the lives of Saints Meriasek and Kea, respectively.[2]

The mediæval period in Ireland

Ireland is notable in its rich hagiographical tradition, and for the large amount of material which was produced during the mediæval period. Irish hagiographers wrote primarily in Latin while some of the later saint's lives were written in the hagiographer's native vernacular Irish. Of particular note are the lives of St. Patrick, St. Columba and St. Brigit—Ireland's three patron saints.

In Eastern Orthodoxy

Example of Greek Orthodox visual hagiography. This is one of the best known surviving Byzantine mosaics in Hagia Sophia - Christ Pantocrator flanked by the Virgin Mary and John the Baptist made in the 12th century.

In the 10th century, a Byzantine monk Simeon Metaphrastes was the first one to change the genre of lives of the saints into something different, giving it a moralizing and panegyrical character. His catalog of lives of the saints became the standard for all of the Western and Eastern hagiographers, who would create relative biographies and images of the ideal saints by gradually departing from the real facts of their lives. Over the years, the genre of lives of the saints had absorbed a number of narrative plots and poetic images (often, of pre-Christian origin, such as dragon fighting etc.), mediaeval parables, short stories and anecdotes.

The genre of lives of the saints was brought to Kievan Rus' by the South Slavs together with writing and also in translations from the Greek language. In the 11th century, the Rus' began to compile the original life stories of the first Rus'ian saints, e.g. Boris and Gleb, Theodosius Pechersky etc. In the 16th century, Metropolitan Macarius expanded the list of the Rus'ian saints and supervised the compiling process of their life stories. They would all be compiled in the so called Velikiye chet’yi-minei catalog (Великие Четьи-Минеи, or Great Menaion Reader), consisting of 12 volumes in accordance with each month of the year. They were revised and expanded by St. Dimitry of Rostov in 1684-1705.

This literary genre was often used as ecclesiastic and political propaganda.[3] Today, the works in the genre of lives of the saints represent a valuable historical source and reflection of different social ideas, world outlook and aesthetic concepts of the past.

Modern usage

The term "hagiography" has come to refer to the works of contemporary biographers and historians whom critics perceive to be uncritical and even "reverential." In addition, modern cult leaders such as Sun Myung Moon, L. Ron Hubbard and Daisaku Ikeda have vast bodies of hagiographic literature that has been written by and about them.

See also

References

  1. ^ Davies, S. (2008). Archive and manuscripts: contents and use: using the sources (3rd ed.). Aberystwyth, UK: Department of Information Studies, Aberystwyth University. p. 5.20. ISBN 978-1-906214-15-9
  2. ^ Koch, John T. (2006). Celtic Culture: A Historical Encyclopedia. ABC-CLIO. pp. 203–205. ISBN 1851094407. http://books.google.com/books?id=f899xH_quaMC&printsec=frontcover&dq=Celtic+Culture#v=onepage&q=&f=false. Retrieved November 23, 2009. 
  3. ^ Propaganda in Hagiography By Theodore Felix, 20 August 2008; Revised - All Empires History

Further reading

  • André Vauchez, La sainteté en Occident aux derniers siècles du Moyen Âge (1198-1431) (BEFAR, 241). Rome, 1981. [Engl. transl.: Sainthood in the Later Middle Ages. Cambridge, 1987; Ital. transl.: La santità nel Medioevo. Bologna, 1989].
  • Ana Mariković and Trpimir Vedriš, eds. Identity and alterity in Hagiography and the Cult of Saints (Bibliotheca Hagiotheca, Series Colloquia 1). Zagreb: Hagiotheca, 2010.

External links


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Look at other dictionaries:

  • Hagiography — • The name given to that branch of learning which has the saints and their worship for its object Catholic Encyclopedia. Kevin Knight. 2006. Hagiography     Hagiography      …   Catholic encyclopedia

  • Hagiography — Ha gi*og ra*phy ( f[y^]; 277), n. Same as {Hagiographa}. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • hagiography — (n.) writing of saints lives, 1821, from Gk. hagios holy (see HAGIOLOGY (Cf. hagiology)) + GRAPHY (Cf. graphy). Related: Hagiographic (1819); hagiographical (1580s); hagiographer (1650s) …   Etymology dictionary

  • hagiography — ► NOUN 1) the writing of the lives of saints. 2) a biography idealizing its subject. DERIVATIVES hagiographic adjective hagiographical adjective …   English terms dictionary

  • hagiography — [hag΄ē äg′rə fē, hā΄jēäg′rə fē] n. pl. hagiographies [ HAGIO + GRAPHY] 1. a book or writing, or an assemblage of these, about the lives of saints 2. such books or writings as a field of study …   English World dictionary

  • HAGIOGRAPHY — Although hagiographies, embellished accounts of biblical worthies, are not unknown in previous ages, particularly in the apocrypha (e.g., lives of the prophets and Martyrdom of isaiah ), in the Middle Ages they developed as a specific genre of… …   Encyclopedia of Judaism

  • hagiography — hagiographic /hag ee euh graf ik, hay jee /, hagiographical, adj. /hag ee og reuh fee, hay jee /, n., pl. hagiographies. the writing and critical study of the lives of the saints; hagiology. [1805 15; HAGIO + GRAPHY] * * * Literature describing… …   Universalium

  • hagiography — UK [ˌhæɡɪˈɒɡrəfɪ] / US [ˌhæɡɪˈɑɡrəfɪ] noun [countable] Word forms hagiography : singular hagiography plural hagiographies 1) a book about the lives of saints 2) formal a book about a person s life that deliberately includes only good things about …   English dictionary

  • hagiography — noun Date: 1821 1. biography of saints or venerated persons 2. idealizing or idolizing biography …   New Collegiate Dictionary

  • hagiography — noun /ˌheɪdʒiˈɑɡrəfi,ˌhæɡiˈɒɡrəfi/ a) The study of saints. b) A biography of a saint …   Wiktionary


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