Folly (allegory)


Folly (allegory)

Folly (Lang-la|Moria) was a common allegorical figure in medieval morality plays and in allegorical artwork through the Renaissance. The depiction is generally of a young man, often similar in appearance to a jester or the tarot card, The Fool [citebook|title=Costumes and Scenery for Amateurs|last=Mackay|first=Constance D'Arcy|page=197|publisher=Henry Holt and Company|year=1915] . In contrast to the many obvious classical allusions in such works, the depictions owe little to the greek goddess Ate.

In drama, the character tempts the protagonist into foolish action, successfully or not. In an allegorical painting, the figure may be counterpoised to Prudence, representing a choice, or alone, representing the unwisdom of the actors in the painting.

Notes

References

ee also

*"In Praise of Folly" by Desiderius Erasmus.
*"Venus, Cupid, Folly and Time, allegorical painting by Agnolo Bronzino


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