Non-canonical books referenced in the Bible


Non-canonical books referenced in the Bible

The non-canonical books in this article include Biblical apocrypha and Deuterocanonical books (which are accepted as part of the Biblical canon by most non-Protestant Christians), Pseudepigrapha, writings from Hellenistic and other non-Biblical cultures, and lost works of known or unknown status. For the purposes of this article, referenced can mean direct quotations, paraphrases, or allusions, which in some cases are known only because they have been identified as such by ancient writers, or the citation of a work or author.

Contents

Hebrew Bible references

The Hebrew Bible, also known as the Tanakh by Jews, and called the Old Testament by Christians, or the Protocanonical books.

  • The Book of Jasher (whose title fully translated means the Book of the Upright or the Book of the Just) is mentioned in Joshua 10:13 and 2 Samuel 1:18. From the context in the Book of Samuel it is implied that it was a collection of poetry. Several books have claimed to be this lost text, but are widely discounted as pseudepigrapha.
  • The Book of the Wars of the Lord.[1] Referenced at Numbers 21:14.
  • A "Book of Songs" is referenced at 1 Kings 8:12-13 (Septuagint).
  • The Chronicles of the Kings of Israel (lost/missing) and Chronicles of the Kings of Judah ("2 Chronicles" in the Christian Old Testament or "Divrei Hayamim II" in the Hebrew Tanakh) are mentioned in the Books of Kings (1 Kings 14:19, 14:29). They are said to tell of events during the reigns of Kings Jeroboam of Israel and Rehoboam of Judah, respectively. The Chronicles of the Kings of Israel is again mentioned in 1 Kings 16:20 regarding King Zimri, and many other times throughout 1 and 2 Kings.
  • "The Book of Shemaiah the prophet, and of Iddo the Seer" (also called Story of the Prophet Iddo or The Annuals of the Prophet Iddo) is mentioned in the book of 2nd Chronicles. (II Chr 9:29, 12:15, 13:22). Iddo was a seer who lived during the reigns of Solomon, Rehoboam, and Abijah. His deeds were recorded in this book, which has been completely lost to history, save for its title. However, it is interesting to note that Zechariah was the son of Iddo (Ezra 5:1, Zechariah 1:1)
  • The Manner of the Kingdom[2]
Referenced at 1Samuel 10:25.
Referenced at 1Kings 11:41.
Referenced at 1Chronicles 27:24.
Referenced at 1Chronicles 29:29.
Referenced at 1Chronicles 29:29, and also 2Chronicles 9:29.
Referenced at 1Chronicles 29:29.
Referenced at 2Chronicles 9:29.
Referenced in 2Chronicles 16:11, 2Chronicles 27:7 and 2Chronicles 32:32. Might be the same as 1 & 2 Kings.
Referenced at 2Chronicles 20:34.
Referenced at 2Chronicles 24:27.
Referenced at 2Chronicles 26:22.
  • The Vision of Isaiah[11]
Referenced at 2Chronicles 32:32.
Referenced at 2Chronicles 33:18.
Referenced at 2Chronicles 33:19.
Referenced at 2Chronicles 35:25.
Referenced at Esther 2:23, Esther 6:1, Esther 10:2, and Nehemiah 12:23.

Deuterocanonical references

Book of Tobit

Sirach[15] (verse numbers vary slightly between versions)

2 Maccabees

New Testament references

Nestle's Greek New Testament lists some 132 New Testament passages that appear to be verbal allusions to paracanonical books.[17]

Pagan authors quoted or alluded to:[18][19]

Non canonical books quoted or alluded to:[18]

See also

Notes

  1. ^ Sometimes called The Book of the Wars of Yahweh. One source says "The quotation is in lyrical form, so it is possibly a book of poetry or a hymnal...Moses quoted it, so the date of its composition must have been prior to the completion of the Pentateuch, perhaps during the wanderings in the wilderness. Nothing else is known about it, and it survives only in Moses’ quotation."[1]
  2. ^ Also called The Book of Statutes or 3 Samuel.
  3. ^ Also called The Book of the Acts of Solomon
  4. ^ Also called The Book of the Annals of King David or The Chronicles of King David, which could be a reference to the rest of 1 Chronicles.[2]
  5. ^ . could be a reference to 2 Samuel
  6. ^ Also called Gad the Seer or The Acts of Gad the Seer
  7. ^ Also called The Prophesy of Ahijah the Shilonite [3].
  8. ^ Also called The Book of the Kings of Israel and Judah.
  9. ^ Also called The Book of Jehu the son of Hanani
  10. ^ Also called Midrash on the Book of Kings
  11. ^ Also called The Vision of the Prophet Isaiah. May be identical to the pseudepigraphal Ascension of Isaiah.
  12. ^ Also called The Acts of the Seers
  13. ^ Also called The Book of Records of the Chronicles or The Book of the Chronicles of the Kings of Media and Persia
  14. ^ a b c d e f See footnote to the Biblical passage in The Jerusalem Bible, Garden City, New York: Doubleday & Company, 1966
  15. ^ Other names include: Ecclesiasticus or Wisdom of Jesus Ben Sira
  16. ^ Rollston, Chris A. (April 2001). "Ben Sira 38:24-39:11 and The Egyptian Satire of the Trades". Journal of Biblical Literature 120 (Spring): 131–139. 
  17. ^ A general introduction to the Bible: from ancient tablets to modern translations By David Ewert,77
  18. ^ a b James & Jude, Gary Holloway, 140
  19. ^ The Old Testament pseudepigrapha and the New Testament: prolegomena for the, James H. Charlesworth
  20. ^ Twenty-six reasons why Jews don't believe in Jesus, Asher Norman.
  21. ^ Plots of epiphany: prison-escape in Acts of the Apostles By John B. Weaver
  22. ^ a b [4]
  23. ^ [5]
  24. ^ Martin, Ralph P. 2 Corinthians Word Biblical Commentary 40,

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Look at other dictionaries:

  • Books of the Bible — are listed differently in the canons of Jews, and Catholic, Protestant, Greek Orthodox, Slavonic Orthodox, Georgian, Armenian Apostolic, Syriac and Ethiopian Churches, although there is substantial overlap. A table comparing the canons of some of …   Wikipedia

  • Hebrew Bible — The term Hebrew Bible is a generic reference to those books of the Bible originally written in Biblical Hebrew (and the related Biblical Aramaic). The term closely corresponds to contents of the Jewish Tanakh and the Protestant Old Testament, see …   Wikipedia

  • Chronicles of the Kings of Israel — The similarly named Biblical books are located at Books of Chronicles. The Chronicles of the Kings of Israel is a book that gives a more detailed account of the reigns of the kings of ancient Kingdom of Israel than that presented in the Hebrew… …   Wikipedia

  • Book of Gad the Seer — The Book of Gad the Seer is a lost text that was probably written by the Biblical prophet Gad. It is described at bibleverse|1|Chronicles|29:29|HE. The passage reads: Now the acts of David the king, first and last, behold, they are written in the …   Wikipedia

  • Book of Nathan the Prophet — The Book of Nathan the Prophet is a lost text that claims authorship by the Biblical prophet Nathan. It is described at bibleref|1Chronicles|29:29. The passage reads: Now the acts of David the king, first and last, behold, they are written in the …   Wikipedia

  • Book of the Wars of the Lord — The Book of the Wars of the Lord is one of several non canonical books referenced in the Bible which has now been completely lost. [ [http://www.aishdas.org/toratemet/en torah.html Student, Gil. On the Authorship of the Torah. ( Aishdas.org )]… …   Wikipedia

  • Book of Samuel the Seer — The Book of Samuel the Seer is a lost text that was probably written by the Biblical Judge/Prophet Samuel. The book is described at bibleverse|1|Chronicles|29:29|HE. The passage reads: Now the acts of David the king, first and last, behold, they… …   Wikipedia

  • Visions of Iddo the Seer — The book called the Visions of Iddo the Seer is a lost text that was probably written by the Biblical Prophet Iddo, who lived at the time of Rehoboam. The book is described at bibleref|2Chronicles|9:29. The passage reads: Now the rest of the acts …   Wikipedia

  • Story of the Prophet Iddo — The Story of the Prophet Iddo is a lost text that was probably written by the Biblical Prophet Iddo, who lived at the time of Rehoboam. The book is described at bibleref|2Chronicles|13:22. The passage reads: And the rest of the acts of Abijah,… …   Wikipedia

  • Sayings of the Seers — The Sayings of the Seers, (or Sayings of Hozai, in the Masoretic Text), is a lost text referred to in bibleref|2Chronicles|33:19. The passage reads: His prayer also, and how God was intreated of him, and all his sin, and his trespass, and the… …   Wikipedia


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