Constantine's Bridge


Constantine's Bridge

Constantine's Bridge ( _ro. Podul lui Constantin cel Mare; _bg. Мост на Константин Велики, "Most na Konstantin Veliki") was a bridge over the Danube that was completed or rebuilt [Biblioteca „V.A. Urechia“ site http://www.bvau.ro/docs/doc_eng.htm] in 328, and was a construction with masonry piers and wooden arch bridge and with wooden superstructure. It was constructed between the present-day Romanian Celei, Olt county (near Corabia, and then the city of Sucidava) and Bulgarian Gigen, Pleven Province (ancient Oescus), [Pamfil Polonic aflate în arhiva Muzeului Naţional de Antichităţi — Institutul de Arheologie „Vasile Pârvan” http://www.cimec.ro/Arheologie/ArhivaDigitala/4Pamfil20Polonic/PolonicP_Varia_71planse/Planse_sumar.htm] [Pamfil Polonic aflate în arhiva Muzeului Naţional de Antichităţi — Institutul de Arheologie „Vasile Pârvan” http://www.cimec.ro/Arheologie/Digitalarchives/4Pamfil%20Polonic/Polonic.htm] by Constantine the Great [International Database Of Structures http://en.structurae.de/structures/data/index.cfm?ID=s0003933] .The bridge was apparently used until the mid 4th century [CIMEC Archeologica report http://www.cimec.ro/scripts/arh/cronica/detail.asp?k=2210] , the main reason for this assumption being the fact that Valens had to cross the Danube using a bridge of boats at Constantiana Daphne during his campaign against the Goths in 367. [cite book|last=Kulikowski|first=Michael|title=Rome's Gothic Wars|publisher=Cambridge University Press|date=2007|pages=116-117|isbn=0521846331 at [http://books.google.com/books?id=QXM9SH4EALgC&pg=PA116&lpg=PA116&dq=Sucidava+Bridge+Destruction&source=web&ots=W3TYldNJBD&sig=zEfQqpJ6nzkFMGiJ3ybBk8fkVlw&hl=en&sa=X&oi=book_result&resnum=10&ct=result#PPA117,M1 Google Book Search] ]

Notes

See also

* Roman bridge
* List of Roman bridges


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