Iouga


Iouga

In Celtic polytheism, female deification of junction.

Centres of worship

Iouga was worshipped in Roman Britain an altar-stone raised to her having been recovered in the United Kingdom at YorkFact|date=February 2007. As a deification of junction, she may have been associated with the confluence of the Rivers Ouse and Foss at York.

Etymology

Iouga is derived from the Proto-Celtic "*jugā" meaning 'yoke, join' (q.v. [http://www.wales.ac.uk/documents/external/cawcs/PCl-MoE.pdf] [http://www.wales.ac.uk/documents/external/cawcs/MoE-PCl.pdf] [http://www.indo-european.nl/cgi-bin/query.cgi?root=leiden&basename=%5Cdata%5Cie%5Cceltic] ), from which the feminine Welsh word *"iau" is derived.

ources

* York Castle Museum, York, England.


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