Charles Manners, 6th Duke of Rutland


Charles Manners, 6th Duke of Rutland
Caricature by Coïdé published in Vanity Fair in 1871.

Charles Manners, 6th Duke of Rutland KG (16 May 1815 – 3 March 1888, Belvoir Castle), styled Marquess of Granby before 1857, was an English Conservative politician.

Contents

Background and education

Manners was the third but eldest surviving son of John Manners, 5th Duke of Rutland and Lady Elizabeth Howard, daughter of Frederick Howard, 5th Earl of Carlisle. John Manners, 7th Duke of Rutland and Lord George Manners were his younger brothers.He was educated at Eton and Trinity College, Cambridge, earning an MA in 1835.[1]

Political career

Entering politics as Member of Parliament for Stamford in 1837, Manners became known as a voluble, if not particularly talented, protectionist. He briefly held office as a Lord of the Bedchamber to Prince Albert from 1843 to 1846. Following the resignation of Lord George Bentinck from the leadership of the protectionists in the House of Commons at the beginning of 1848, Granby (as he was then known) became leader on 10 February 1848, as Benjamin Disraeli was unacceptable to Lord Derby, the overall leader of the party, and the majority of the rank and file. Granby resigned on 4 March 1848, feeling himself inadequate to the post, and the party functioned without an actual leader in the commons for the remainder of the parliamentary session.

At the start of the next session, affairs were handled by the triumvirate of Granby, Disraeli, and J. C. Herries. This confused arrangement ended with Granby's resignation in 1851. He also declined to join the First Derby Ministry in 1852, and was appointed Lord Lieutenant of Lincolnshire instead. Granby succeeded to the dukedom of Rutland on the death of his father in 1857. He was made a Knight of the Garter in 1867. He also succeeded his father as Lord Lieutenant of Leicestershire, which post he held until his death at the age of 73.

Personal life

Rutland never married. He had cherished a passion for Mary Anne Ricketts, later Lady Forester, but his father forbade the two to marry. He was succeeded in the dukedom by his brother John.

References

External links

Parliament of the United Kingdom
Preceded by
Thomas Chaplin
George Finch
Member of Parliament for Stamford
18371852
With: Thomas Chaplin 1837–1838
Sir George Clerk, Bt 1838–1847
John Charles Herries 1847–1852
Succeeded by
J. C. Herries
Sir Frederic Thesiger
Preceded by
Lord Charles Manners
Edward Farnham
Member of Parliament for North Leicestershire
18521857
With: Edward Farnham 1852–1857
Succeeded by
Edward Farnham
Lord John Manners
Honorary titles
Preceded by
The Earl Brownlow
Lord Lieutenant of Lincolnshire
1852–1857
Succeeded by
The Earl of Yarborough
Preceded by
The Duke of Rutland
Lord Lieutenant of Leicestershire
1857–1888
Succeeded by
The Earl Howe
Party political offices
Preceded by
Lord George Bentinck
Conservative Leader in the Commons
1848
Succeeded by
Vacancy
Preceded by
Vacancy
Conservative Leader in the Commons
with Benjamin Disraeli and J. C. Herries

1849–1851
Succeeded by
Benjamin Disraeli
Peerage of England
Preceded by
John Manners
Duke of Rutland
1857–1888
Succeeded by
John Manners

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