To set forth


To set forth
Set Set (s[e^]t), v. i. 1. To pass below the horizon; to go down; to decline; to sink out of sight; to come to an end. [1913 Webster]

Ere the weary sun set in the west. --Shak. [1913 Webster]

Thus this century sets with little mirth, and the next is likely to arise with more mourning. --Fuller. [1913 Webster]

2. To fit music to words. [Obs.] --Shak. [1913 Webster]

3. To place plants or shoots in the ground; to plant. ``To sow dry, and set wet.'' --Old Proverb. [1913 Webster]

4. To be fixed for growth; to strike root; to begin to germinate or form; as, cuttings set well; the fruit has set well (i. e., not blasted in the blossom). [1913 Webster]

5. To become fixed or rigid; to be fastened. [1913 Webster]

A gathering and serring of the spirits together to resist, maketh the teeth to set hard one against another. --Bacon. [1913 Webster]

6. To congeal; to concrete; to solidify; -- of cements, glues, gels, concrete, substances polymerizing into plastics, etc. [1913 Webster +PJC]

That fluid substance in a few minutes begins to set. --Boyle. [1913 Webster]

7. To have a certain direction in motion; to flow; to move on; to tend; as, the current sets to the north; the tide sets to the windward. [1913 Webster]

8. To begin to move; to go out or forth; to start; -- now followed by out. [1913 Webster]

The king is set from London. --Shak. [1913 Webster]

9. To indicate the position of game; -- said of a dog; as, the dog sets well; also, to hunt game by the aid of a setter. [1913 Webster]

10. To apply one's self; to undertake earnestly; -- now followed by out. [1913 Webster]

If he sets industriously and sincerely to perform the commands of Christ, he can have no ground of doubting but it shall prove successful to him. --Hammond. [1913 Webster]

11. To fit or suit one; to sit; as, the coat sets well.

Note: [Colloquially used, but improperly, for sit.] [1913 Webster]

Note: The use of the verb set for sit in such expressions as, the hen is setting on thirteen eggs; a setting hen, etc., although colloquially common, and sometimes tolerated in serious writing, is not to be approved. [1913 Webster]

{To set about}, to commence; to begin.

{To set forward}, to move or march; to begin to march; to advance.

{To set forth}, to begin a journey.

{To set in}. (a) To begin; to enter upon a particular state; as, winter set in early. (b) To settle one's self; to become established. ``When the weather was set in to be very bad.'' --Addison. (c) To flow toward the shore; -- said of the tide.

{To set off}. (a) To enter upon a journey; to start. (b) (Typog.) To deface or soil the next sheet; -- said of the ink on a freshly printed sheet, when another sheet comes in contact with it before it has had time to dry.

{To set on} or {To set upon}. (a) To begin, as a journey or enterprise; to set about. [1913 Webster]

He that would seriously set upon the search of truth. --Locke. [1913 Webster] (b) To assault; to make an attack. --Bacon. [1913 Webster]

Cassio hath here been set on in the dark. --Shak. [1913 Webster]

{To set out}, to begin a journey or course; as, to set out for London, or from London; to set out in business;to set out in life or the world.

{To set to}, to apply one's self to.

{To set up}. (a) To begin business or a scheme of life; as, to set up in trade; to set up for one's self. (b) To profess openly; to make pretensions. [1913 Webster]

Those men who set up for mortality without regard to religion, are generally but virtuous in part. --Swift. [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • set forth something — set forth (something) to explain or state something officially. Our views were set forth by our attorney in her March 13th letter. The board set forth the conditions for her release. Selina based her argument on the rights set forth in the First… …   New idioms dictionary

  • set forth — (something) to explain or state something officially. Our views were set forth by our attorney in her March 13th letter. The board set forth the conditions for her release. Selina based her argument on the rights set forth in the First Amendment… …   New idioms dictionary

  • set forth — I verb allege, argue, articulate, assert, characterize, cite, commence, communicate, contend, convey, declare, delineate, demonstrate, depict, describe, detail, develop, disclose, display, divulge, enunciate, evince, expound, express, illustrate …   Law dictionary

  • set forth — ► set forth 1) begin a journey or trip. 2) state or describe in writing or speech. Main Entry: ↑set …   English terms dictionary

  • set forth evidence — index bare Burton s Legal Thesaurus. William C. Burton. 2006 …   Law dictionary

  • set forth in a will — index testamentary Burton s Legal Thesaurus. William C. Burton. 2006 …   Law dictionary

  • set forth in words — index express Burton s Legal Thesaurus. William C. Burton. 2006 …   Law dictionary

  • set forth the character of — index characterize Burton s Legal Thesaurus. William C. Burton. 2006 …   Law dictionary

  • set forth the meaning — index interpret Burton s Legal Thesaurus. William C. Burton. 2006 …   Law dictionary

  • set forth — verb 1. state (Freq. 15) set forth one s reasons • Syn: ↑expound, ↑exposit • Derivationally related forms: ↑exposition (for: ↑exposit) …   Useful english dictionary

  • set forth — phrasal verb Word forms set forth : present tense I/you/we/they set forth he/she/it sets forth present participle setting forth past tense set forth past participle set forth 1) [intransitive] literary to start a journey, especially one that is… …   English dictionary


Share the article and excerpts

Direct link
Do a right-click on the link above
and select “Copy Link”

We are using cookies for the best presentation of our site. Continuing to use this site, you agree with this.