complementariness
noun see complementary

New Collegiate Dictionary. 2001.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • complementariness — See complementarily. * * * …   Universalium

  • complementariness — noun The state or quality of being complementary; complementarity …   Wiktionary

  • complementariness — n. complementary quality, being able to make whole …   English contemporary dictionary

  • complementariness — com·ple·men·ta·ri·ness …   English syllables

  • complementariness — ˌkämpləˈmentərēnə̇s, en.trē , rin noun ( es) : the quality or state of being complementary * * * complementˈariness noun • • • Main Entry: ↑complement …   Useful english dictionary

  • complementary — complementariness, n. /kom pleuh men teuh ree, tree/, adj., n., pl. complementaries. adj. 1. forming a complement; completing. 2. complementing each other. n. 3. See complementary color (def. 1). [1590 1600; COMPLEMENT + ARY] * * * …   Universalium

  • complementary — adjective Date: 1829 1. relating to or constituting one of a pair of contrasting colors that produce a neutral color when combined in suitable proportions 2. serving to fill out or complete 3. mutually supplying each other s lack 4. being… …   New Collegiate Dictionary

  • Frame analysis — is a multi disciplinary social science research method used to analyze how people understand situations and activities. The concept is generally attributed to the work of Erving Goffman and his 1974 book Frame analysis: An essay on the… …   Wikipedia

  • Cultural policy — is the area of public policy making that governs activities related to the arts and culture. Generally, this involves fostering processes, legal classifications and institutions which promote cultural diversity and accessibility, as well as… …   Wikipedia

  • Framing (social sciences) — For other uses, see Framing (disambiguation). Contents 1 Framing effect in communication research 1.1 Frame building 1.2 F …   Wikipedia

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