axisymmetry
noun see axisymmetric

New Collegiate Dictionary. 2001.

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  • axisymmetry — See axisymmetrically. * * * …   Universalium

  • axisymmetry — noun symmetry about an axis; rotational symmetry See Also: axisymmetric …   Wiktionary

  • Numerical relativity — is one of the branches of general relativity that uses numerical methods and algorithms to solve and analyze problems. To this end, supercomputers are often employed to study black holes, gravitational waves, neutron stars and many other… …   Wikipedia

  • Stokes stream function — In fluid dynamics, the Stokes stream function is used to describe the streamlines and flow velocity in a three dimensional incompressible flow with axisymmetry. A surface with a constant value of the Stokes stream function encloses a streamtube,… …   Wikipedia

  • axisymmetric — also axisymmetrical adjective Etymology: axis + symmetric Date: 1893 symmetric in respect to an axis • axisymmetry noun …   New Collegiate Dictionary

  • Stokes' law — In 1851, George Gabriel Stokes derived an expression, now known as Stokes law, for the frictional force also called drag force exerted on spherical objects with very small Reynolds numbers (e.g., very small particles) in a continuous viscous… …   Wikipedia

  • Kerr metric — In general relativity, the Kerr metric (or Kerr vacuum) describes the geometry of spacetime around a rotating massive body. According to this metric, such rotating bodies should exhibit frame dragging, an unusual prediction of general relativity; …   Wikipedia

  • Rotational symmetry — Generally speaking, an object with rotational symmetry is an object that looks the same after a certain amount of rotation. An object may have more than one rotational symmetry; for instance, if reflections or turning it over are not counted, the …   Wikipedia

  • Exact solutions in general relativity — In general relativity, an exact solution is a Lorentzian manifold equipped with certain tensor fields which are taken to model states of ordinary matter, such as a fluid, or classical nongravitational fields such as the electromagnetic field.… …   Wikipedia

  • Surface gravity — The surface gravity, g , of an astronomical or other object is the gravitational acceleration experienced at its surface. The surface gravity may be thought of as the acceleration due to gravity experienced by a hypothetical test particle which… …   Wikipedia

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