yoke
I. noun (plural yokes) Etymology: Middle English yok, from Old English geoc; akin to Old High German joh yoke, Latin jugum, Greek zygon, Sanskrit yuga, Latin jungere to join Date: before 12th century 1. a. a wooden bar or frame by which two draft animals (as oxen) are joined at the heads or necks for working together b. an arched device formerly laid on the neck of a defeated person c. a frame fitted to a person's shoulders to carry a load in two equal portions d. a bar by which the end of the tongue of a wagon or carriage is suspended from the collars of the harness e. (1) a crosspiece on the head of a boat's rudder (2) an airplane control operating the elevators and ailerons f. a frame from which a bell is hung g. a clamp or similar piece that embraces two parts to hold or unite them in position 2. plural usually yoke two animals yoked or worked together 3. a. (1) an oppressive agency (2) servitude, bondage b. tie, link; especially marriage 4. a fitted or shaped piece at the top of a skirt or at the shoulder of various garments II. verb (yoked; yoking) Date: before 12th century transitive verb 1. a. (1) to put a yoke on (2) to join in or with a yoke b. to attach a draft animal to; also to attach (a draft animal) to something 2. to join as if by a yoke 3. to put to work intransitive verb to become joined or linked

New Collegiate Dictionary. 2001.

Synonyms:

Look at other dictionaries:

  • YOKE — (Heb. עוֹל). In the Bible The yoke was usually made from a circular wooden halter which was placed on the animal s neck, and harnessed to a plow, cart, or other vehicle. Pegs, two on each side, with the neck of the animal between them, were… …   Encyclopedia of Judaism

  • Yoke — (y[=o]k), n. [OE. yok, [yogh]oc, AS. geoc; akin to D. juk, OHG. joh, G. joch, Icel. & Sw. ok, Dan. aag, Goth. juk, Lith. jungas, Russ. igo, L. jugum, Gr. zy gon, Skr. yuga, and to L. jungere to join, Gr. ?, Skr. yui. [root]109, 280. Cf. {Join},… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • yoke — [yōk] n. pl. yokes or yoke [ME yok < OE geoc, akin to Ger joch < IE * yugo (> Sans yuga, L jungere, jugum, Gr zeugma, Welsh iau, OSlav igo) < base * yeu , to join] 1. a wooden frame or bar with loops or bows at either end, fitted… …   English World dictionary

  • Yoke — Yoke, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Yoked}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Yoking}.] [1913 Webster] 1. To put a yoke on; to join in or with a yoke; as, to yoke oxen, or pair of oxen. [1913 Webster] 2. To couple; to join with another. Be ye not unequally yoked with… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • yoke — ► NOUN 1) a wooden crosspiece that is fastened over the necks of two animals and attached to a plough or cart that they pull in unison. 2) (pl. same or yokes) a pair of yoked animals. 3) a frame fitting over the neck and shoulders of a person,… …   English terms dictionary

  • Yoke — Yoke, v. i. To be joined or associated; to be intimately connected; to consort closely; to mate. [1913 Webster] We ll yoke together, like a double shadow. Shak. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • yoke — yoke, yolk A yoke is a wooden crosspiece of the kind fixed over the necks of work animals. A yolk is the yellow part of an egg (and is related to the word yellow) …   Modern English usage

  • yoke — [n] bondage, bond burden, chain, coupling, enslavement, helotry, knot, ligament, ligature, link, nexus, oppression, peonage, serfdom, service, servility, servitude, slavery, tie; concepts 513,677 yoke [v] bond together; join associate, attach,… …   New thesaurus

  • yoke — index bondage, curb, fetter, incorporate (include), join (bring together), lock, subjection …   Law dictionary

  • yoke — *couple, pair, brace …   New Dictionary of Synonyms

  • Yoke — For other uses, see Yoke (disambiguation). Not to be confused with Egg yolk. Withers yoke A yoke is a wooden beam, normally used between a pair of oxen or other animals to enable them to pull together on a load when working in pairs, as oxen… …   Wikipedia

Share the article and excerpts

Direct link
Do a right-click on the link above
and select “Copy Link”