wax
I. noun Etymology: Middle English, from Old English weax; akin to Old High German wahs wax, Lithuanian vaškas Date: before 12th century 1. a substance that is secreted by bees and is used by them for constructioncting the honeycomb, that is a dull yellow solid plastic when warm, and that is composed of a mixture of esters, cerotic acid, and hydrocarbons — called also beeswax 2. any of various substances resembling the wax of bees: as a. any of numerous substances of plant or animal origin that differ from fats in being less greasy, harder, and more brittle and in containing principally compounds of high molecular weight (as fatty acids, alcohols, and saturated hydrocarbons) b. a solid substance (as ozokerite or paraffin wax) of mineral origin consisting usually of hydrocarbons of high molecular weight c. a pliable or liquid composition used especially in uniting surfaces, excluding air, making patterns or impressions, or producing a polished surface 3. something likened to wax as soft, impressionable, or readily molded 4. a waxy secretion; especially earwax 5. a phonograph recording • waxlike adjective II. transitive verb Date: 14th century 1. a. to treat or rub with wax usually for polishing, stiffening, or reducing friction b. to apply wax to (as legs) as a depilatory 2. to record on phonograph records 3. slang to defeat decisively (as in an athletic contest) III. intransitive verb Etymology: Middle English, from Old English weaxan; akin to Old High German wahsan to increase, Greek auxanein, Latin augēre — more at eke Date: before 12th century 1. a. to increase in size, numbers, strength, prosperity, or intensity b. to grow in volume or duration c. to grow toward full development 2. to increase in phase or intensity — used chiefly of the moon, other satellites, and inferior planets 3. to assume a (specified) characteristic, quality, or state ; become <
wax indignant
>
<
wax poetic
>
IV. noun Date: 14th century increase, growth — usually used in the phrase on the wax V. noun Etymology: perhaps from 3wax Date: 1854 a fit of temper ; rage

New Collegiate Dictionary. 2001.

Synonyms:

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Wax — Wax, n. [AS. weax; akin to OFries. wax, D. was, G. wachs, OHG. wahs, Icel. & Sw. vax, Dan. vox, Lith. vaszkas, Russ. vosk .] [1913 Webster] 1. A fatty, solid substance, produced by bees, and employed by them in the construction of their comb;… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • wax — ● wax nom masculin (anglais wax, cire) En Afrique noire, tissu de coton imprimé de qualité supérieure. wax n. m. Tissu de coton imprimé d un dessin évoquant des craquelures, obtenu par un procédé à la cire. (En appos.) Un tissu wax. Un pagne wax …   Encyclopédie Universelle

  • Wax — Wax, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Waxed}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Waxing}.] To smear or rub with wax; to treat with wax; as, to wax a thread or a table. [1913 Webster] {Waxed cloth}, cloth covered with a coating of wax, used as a cover, of tables and for other… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Wax — (w[a^]ks), v. i. [imp. {Waxed}; p. p. {Waxed}, and Obs. or Poetic {Waxen}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Waxing}.] [AS. weaxan; akin to OFries. waxa, D. wassen, OS. & OHG. wahsan, G. wachsen, Icel. vaxa, Sw. v[ a]xa, Dan. voxe, Goth. wahsjan, Gr. ? to… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Wax — Cette page d’homonymie répertorie les différents sujets et articles partageant un même nom. {{{image}}}   Sigles d une seule lettre   Sigles de deux lettres > Sigles de trois lettres …   Wikipédia en Français

  • wax — wax1 [waks] n. [ME < OE weax, akin to Ger wachs < IE * wokso < * weg , to weave, prob. < base * (a)we , to WEAVE] 1. a plastic, dull yellow substance secreted by bees for building cells; beeswax: it is hard when cold and easily molded …   English World dictionary

  • wax — ‘soft oily substance’ [OE] and the now archaic wax ‘grow, become’ [OE] are distinct words. The former comes (together with German wachs, Dutch was, Swedish vax, and Danish vox) from a prehistoric Germanic *wakhsam. This in turn was descended from …   The Hutchinson dictionary of word origins

  • wax — ‘soft oily substance’ [OE] and the now archaic wax ‘grow, become’ [OE] are distinct words. The former comes (together with German wachs, Dutch was, Swedish vax, and Danish vox) from a prehistoric Germanic *wakhsam. This in turn was descended from …   Word origins

  • wax — verb. In the meaning ‘to assume a specified tone or state’, wax is followed by an adjective, not an adverb: to wax lyrical, to wax enthusiastic, etc.: • When the Roman soldiers were asked to take part in the Claudian invasion of 43, they waxed… …   Modern English usage

  • wax — Ⅰ. wax [1] ► NOUN 1) beeswax. 2) a soft solid oily substance that melts easily, used for making candles or polishes. ► VERB 1) polish or treat with wax. 2) remove hair from (a part of the body) by applying wax and then peeling it off with the… …   English terms dictionary

  • Wax — Información artística Género(s) Pop Período de actividad 1985 – 1988 Miembros …   Wikipedia Español

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