I. transitive verb Etymology: Middle English to pack, load, bind, from Anglo-French trusser, trousser, from Vulgar Latin *torsare, from *torsus twisted — more at torsade Date: 13th century 1. a. to secure tightly ; bind b. to arrange for cooking by binding close the wings or legs of (a fowl) 2. to support, strengthen, or stiffen by or as if by a truss • trusser noun II. noun Date: 13th century 1. an iron band around a lower mast with an attachment by which a yard is secured to the mast 2. a. bracket 1 b. an assemblage of members (as beams) forming a rigid framework 3. a device worn to reduce a hernia by pressure 4. a compact flower or fruit cluster

New Collegiate Dictionary. 2001.


Look at other dictionaries:

  • Truss — Truss, n. [OE. trusse, F. trousse, OF. also tourse; perhaps fr. L. tryrsus stalk, stem. Cf. {Thyrsus}, {Torso}, {Trousers}, {Trousseau}.] 1. A bundle; a package; as, a truss of grass. Fabyan. [1913 Webster] Bearing a truss of trifles at his back …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Truss — Truss, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Trussed}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Trussing}.] [F. trousser. See {Truss}, n.] 1. To bind or pack close; to tie up tightly; to make into a truss. Shak. [1913 Webster] It [his hood] was trussed up in his wallet. Chaucer. [1913… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Truss — steht für: Trage und Aufbaukonstruktionen in der Veranstaltungstechnik, siehe Traverse (Veranstaltungstechnik) Truss ist der Familienname folgender Personen: Lynne Truss (* 1955), englische Autorin und Journalistin Warren Truss (* 1948),… …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • truss — truss; truss·er; un·truss; …   English syllables

  • truss — ► NOUN 1) a framework of rafters, posts, and struts which supports a roof, bridge, or other structure. 2) a padded belt worn against the skin to support a hernia. 3) a large projection of stone or timber, typically one supporting a cornice. 4)… …   English terms dictionary

  • truss — [trus] vt. [ME trussen < OFr trousser, to bundle together, pack < ? VL * torsare < * torsus, for L tortus, pp. of torquere, to twist: see TORT] 1. to tie, bind, or bundle: often with up 2. to skewer or bind the wings and legs of (a fowl) …   English World dictionary

  • Truss — (engl., spr. tröss, »Bündel, Bund«), ein Gewicht, besonders für Stroh und Heu, 36 im Load des englischen Handelsgewichtes: für Stroh 36, trockenes Heu 56 und Heu bis 4. Sept. 60 Pounds avdp …   Meyers Großes Konversations-Lexikon

  • truss — index bear (support) Burton s Legal Thesaurus. William C. Burton. 2006 …   Law dictionary

  • truss — (n.) c.1200, collection of things bound together, from O.Fr. trousse, torse, of unknown origin, perhaps from V.L. *torciare to twist. Meaning surgical appliance to support a rupture, etc. first attested 1540s. Sense of framework for supporting a… …   Etymology dictionary

  • Truss — For other uses, see Truss (disambiguation). In architecture and structural engineering, a truss is a structure comprising one or more triangular units constructed with straight members whose ends are connected at joints referred to as nodes.… …   Wikipedia

  • truss — [[t]trʌ̱s[/t]] trusses, trussing, trussed 1) VERB To truss someone means to tie them up very tightly so that they cannot move. [WRITTEN] [V n] She trussed him quickly with stolen bandage, and gagged his mouth. Syn: bind PHRASAL VERB: usu passive… …   English dictionary

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