trickle
I. intransitive verb (trickled; trickling) Etymology: Middle English trikelen, of imitative origin Date: 14th century 1. a. to issue or fall in drops b. to flow in a thin gentle stream 2. a. to move or go one by one or little by little <
customers began to trickle in
>
b. to dissipate slowly <
his enthusiasm trickled away
>
II. noun Date: 1580 a thin, slow, or intermittent stream or movement

New Collegiate Dictionary. 2001.

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  • trickle — trick‧le [ˈtrɪkl] verb [intransitive] to move somewhere slowly and in very small numbers or amounts: • Only four or five customers had trickled in by 11:30. • Details of the programs have trickled out over the past weeks, but haven t been widely …   Financial and business terms

  • trickle — (v.) late 14c., possibly an aphetic variant of stricklen to trickle, a frequentative form of striken to flow, move (see STRIKE (Cf. strike)). Related: Trickled; trickling. The noun is 1570s, from the verb. Trickle down as an adjectival phrase in… …   Etymology dictionary

  • trickle — ► VERB 1) (of a liquid) flow in a small stream. 2) (trickle down) (of wealth) gradually benefit the poorest as a result of the increasing wealth of the richest. 3) come or go slowly or gradually. ► NOUN 1) a small flow of liquid. 2) a small group …   English terms dictionary

  • trickle — [trik′əl] vi. trickled, trickling [ME triklen < ?] 1. to flow slowly in a thin stream or fall in drops 2. to move, come, go, etc. little by little [the crowd trickled away] vt. to cause to trickle n. 1. the act of trickling …   English World dictionary

  • Trickle — Tric kle (tr[i^]k k l), v. i. [imp. & p. p. {Trickled} (tr[i^]k k ld); p. pr. & vb. n. {Trickling} (tr[i^]k kl[i^]ng).] [OE. triklen, probably for striklen, freq. of striken to flow, AS. str[imac]can. See {Strike}, v. t.] To flow in a small,… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Trickle — Tric kle, n. The act or state of trickling; also, that which trickles; a small stream; drip. Streams that . . . are short and rapid torrents after a storm, but at other times dwindle to feeble trickles of mud. James Bryce. [Webster 1913 Suppl.] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • trickle — index distill, exude, paucity Burton s Legal Thesaurus. William C. Burton. 2006 …   Law dictionary

  • trickle — [v] run out crawl, creep, distill, dribble, drip, drop, exude, flow, issue, leak, ooze, percolate, seep, stream, trill, weep; concepts 146,179 Ant. flow …   New thesaurus

  • trickle — trick|le1 [ˈtrıkəl] v [I always + adverb/preposition] [Date: 1300 1400; Origin: Perhaps from the sound] 1.) if liquid trickles somewhere, it flows slowly in drops or in a thin stream trickle down/into/out ▪ The tears trickled down her cheeks. 2.) …   Dictionary of contemporary English

  • trickle — trick|le1 [ trıkl ] verb intransitive 1. ) if a liquid or a substance such as sand trickles somewhere, a small amount of it flows there slowly: A solitary tear trickled down his cheek. We let the sand trickle between our toes. 2. ) if people or… …   Usage of the words and phrases in modern English

  • trickle — I UK [ˈtrɪk(ə)l] / US verb [intransitive] Word forms trickle : present tense I/you/we/they trickle he/she/it trickles present participle trickling past tense trickled past participle trickled 1) if a liquid or a substance such as sand trickles… …   English dictionary

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