trencher
I. noun Etymology: Middle English trenchour knife, serving platter, from Anglo-French, from trencher to cut Date: 14th century a wooden platter for serving food II. adjective Date: 14th century 1. of or relating to a trencher or to meals 2. archaic having the nature of a parasite ; sycophantic III. noun Etymology: 2trench Date: 1851 one that digs trenches; specifically a usually self-propelled excavating machine typically employing a bucket conveyor and used to dig trenches especially for pipelines and cables

New Collegiate Dictionary. 2001.

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  • Trencher — Trench er, n. [OE. trencheoir, F. tranchoir, fr. trancher to cut, carve. See {Trench}, v. t.] 1. One who trenches; esp., one who cuts or digs ditches. [1913 Webster] 2. A large wooden plate or platter, as for table use. [1913 Webster] 3. The… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Trencher — may refer to: * Trencher (comics), a comic book series * Trencher (machine), a digging machine * Trencher (tableware), a place setting item * Trencher cap, a square academic cap * Trencher (band), a London based Casio core band …   Wikipedia

  • trencher — Trencher, Semble qu il vient de Truncare, Abscindere, Incidere, Secare, Consecare, Prosecare, Truncare. Trencher une montagne, Perfodere montem, Caedere montem. Trencher le col à quelqu un, Collum alicui desecare, Ferire aliquem securi, Aliquem… …   Thresor de la langue françoyse

  • trencher — c.1300, wooden platter on which to cut meat, from Anglo Fr. trenchour, from O.N.Fr. trencheor a trencher, lit. a cutting place, from O.Fr. trenchier to cut (see TRENCH (Cf. trench)) …   Etymology dictionary

  • trencher — trencher1 [tren′chər] n. [ME < OFr trencheor < trenchier: see TRENCH] Archaic 1. a wooden board or platter on which to carve or serve meat 2. a) food served on a trencher b) a supply of food trencher2 [tren′chər] …   English World dictionary

  • Trencher — Recorded as Trench, Trinch, Trinche, Trenche, and the occupational Trencher, this is an English surname but one of early French origins. Well recorded in Ireland, it was probably introduced into England at or just after the famous Norman Conquest …   Surnames reference

  • Trencher — Piece of wood on which meat was carved. The word had orig. been used of the knife which carved. It was also a thick piece of bread which served as a plate and was given to the poor or the dogs when the meal was finished. A mid 15c rhyme describes …   Dictionary of Medieval Terms and Phrases

  • trencher — /ˈtrɛntʃə / (say trenchuh) noun 1. someone who trenches; someone who makes trenches. 2. → mortarboard (def. 2). 3. Obsolete a. a rectangular or circular flat piece of wood on which meat, or other food, was formerly served or carved. b. such a… …   Australian English dictionary

  • Trencher —    These large flat pieces of bread were used like plates in castles during the Middle Ages. One was placed in front of two people, one of them would cut it in half and give one half to the person next to him. The Trencher would catch meat juices …   The writer's dictionary of science fiction, fantasy, horror and mythology

  • trencher — n. 1 hist. a wooden or earthenware platter for serving food. 2 (in full trencher cap) a stiff square academic cap; a mortarboard. Etymology: ME f. AF trenchour, OF trencheoir f. trenchier: see TRENCH …   Useful english dictionary

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