transpose
I. transitive verb (transposed; transposing) Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French transposer, from Latin transponere (perfect indicative transposui) to change the position of, from trans- + ponere to put, place — more at position Date: 14th century 1. to change in form or nature ; transform 2. to render into another language, style, or manner of expression ; translate 3. to transfer from one place or period to another ; shift 4. to change the relative place or normal order of ; alter the sequence of <
transpose letters to change the spelling
>
5. to write or perform (a musical composition) in a different key 6. to bring (a term) from one side of an algebraic equation to the other with change of sign Synonyms: see reversetransposable adjective II. noun Date: 1937 a matrix formed from another matrix by interchanging the rows and columns

New Collegiate Dictionary. 2001.

Synonyms:
(by putting one in place of the other, or substituting one for the other)


Look at other dictionaries:

  • Transpose — Trans*pose , v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Transposed}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Transposing}.] [F. transposer; pref. trans (L. trans across) + poser to put. See {Pose}.] [1913 Webster] 1. To change the place or order of; to substitute one for the other of; to… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • transposé — transposé, ée (tran spô zé, zée) part. passé de transposer. 1°   Dont la place est intervertie. Il y a dans cette ligne des mots transposés. 2°   Terme de minéralogie. Se dit d un cristal, quand il paraît composé de deux moitiés qui auraient fait …   Dictionnaire de la Langue Française d'Émile Littré

  • transposé — Transposé, [transpos]ée. part. Joüer sur un ton transposé …   Dictionnaire de l'Académie française

  • transpose — index convert (change use), convey (transfer), displace (replace), move (alter position) Burton s Legal Thesaurus. William C. Burton …   Law dictionary

  • transpose — late 14c., from O.Fr. transposer (14c.), from L. transponere (pp. transpositus) to place over, from trans over (see TRANS (Cf. trans )) + ponere to put, place (see POSITION (Cf. position)). Form altered in French on model of poser …   Etymology dictionary

  • transpose — *reverse, invert Analogous words: *exchange, interchange: transfer, shift (see MOVE) …   New Dictionary of Synonyms

  • transpose — [v] swap, switch alter, backtrack*, change, commute, convert, double back, exchange, flip flop*, interchange, inverse, invert, metamorphose, move, put, rearrange, relocate, render, reorder, reverse, revert, shift, substitute, transfer,… …   New thesaurus

  • transpose — ► VERB 1) cause to exchange places. 2) transfer to a different place or context. 3) write or play (music) in a different key from the original. DERIVATIVES transposable adjective transposition noun. ORIGIN Old French transposer, from poser to …   English terms dictionary

  • transpose — [trans pōz′] vt. transposed, transposing [ME transposen < MFr transposer (for L transponere): see TRANS & POSE1] 1. to transfer or shift; now, specif., to change the usual, normal, relative, or respective order or position of; interchange… …   English World dictionary

  • Transpose — This article is about the transpose of a matrix. For other uses, see Transposition In linear algebra, the transpose of a matrix A is another matrix AT (also written A′, Atr or At) created by any one of the following equivalent actions: reflect A… …   Wikipedia

  • transpose — [[t]trænspo͟ʊz[/t]] transposes, transposing, transposed 1) VERB If you transpose something from one place or situation to another, you move it there. [V n from n to n] Genetic engineers transpose or exchange bits of hereditary material from one… …   English dictionary

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