time
I. noun Etymology: Middle English, from Old English tīma; akin to Old Norse tīmi time, Old English tīd — more at tide Date: before 12th century 1. a. the measured or measurable period during which an action, process, or condition exists or continues ; duration b. a nonspatial continuum that is measured in terms of events which succeed one another from past through present to future c. leisure <
time for reading
>
2. the point or period when something occurs ; occasion 3. a. an appointed, fixed, or customary moment or hour for something to happen, begin, or end <
arrived ahead of time
>
b. an opportune or suitable moment <
decided it was time to retire
>
— often used in the phrase about time <
about time for a change
>
4. a. a historical period ; age b. a division of geologic chronology c. conditions at present or at some specified period — usually used in plural <
times are hard
>
<
move with the times
>
d. the present time <
issues of the time
>
5. a. lifetime b. a period of apprenticeship c. a term of military service d. a prison sentence 6. season <
very hot for this time of year
>
7. a. rate of speed ; tempo b. the grouping of the beats of music ; rhythm 8. a. a moment, hour, day, or year as indicated by a clock or calendar <
what time is it
>
b. any of various systems (as sidereal or solar) of reckoning time 9. a. one of a series of recurring instances or repeated actions <
you've been told many times
>
b. plural (1) added or accumulated quantities or instances <
five times greater
>
(2) equal fractional parts of which an indicated number equal a comparatively greater quantity <
seven times smaller
>
<
three times closer
>
c. turn <
three times at bat
>
10. finite as contrasted with infinite duration 11. a person's experience during a specified period or on a particular occasion <
a good time
>
<
a hard time
>
12. a. the hours or days required to be occupied by one's work <
make up time
>
<
on company time
>
b. an hourly pay rate <
straight time
>
c. wages paid at discharge or resignation <
pick up your time and get out
>
13. a. the playing time of a game b. time-out 1 14. a period during which something is used or available for use <
computer time
>
II. verb (timed; timing) Date: 14th century transitive verb 1. a. to arrange or set the time of ; schedule b. to regulate (a watch) to keep correct time 2. to set the tempo, speed, or duration of <
timed his leap perfectly — Neil Amdur
>
3. to cause to keep time with something 4. to determine or record the time, duration, or rate of <
time a horse
>
5. to dispose (as a mechanical part) so that an action occurs at a desired instant or in a desired way intransitive verb to keep or beat time III. adjective Date: circa 1711 1. a. of or relating to time b. recording time 2. timed to ignite or explode at a specific moment <
a time charge
>
3. a. payable on a specified future day or a certain length of time after presentation for acceptance <
a time draft
>
<
time deposits
>
b. based on installment payments <
a time sale
>

New Collegiate Dictionary. 2001.

Synonyms:

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Time — Time, n.; pl. {Times}. [OE. time, AS. t[=i]ma, akin to t[=i]d time, and to Icel. t[=i]mi, Dan. time an hour, Sw. timme. [root]58. See {Tide}, n.] 1. Duration, considered independently of any system of measurement or any employment of terms which… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • TIME — (magazine) Pour les articles homonymes, voir Time.  Time Magazine {{{nomorigine}}} …   Wikipédia en Français

  • TIME — Erstausgabe 1923 Beschreibung Nachrichtenmagazi …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • Time — Time …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • Time — (t[imac]m), v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Timed} (t[imac]md); p. pr. & vb. n. {Timing}.] 1. To appoint the time for; to bring, begin, or perform at the proper season or time; as, he timed his appearance rightly. [1913 Webster] There is no greater wisdom… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Time — Time, v. i. 1. To keep or beat time; to proceed or move in time. [1913 Webster] With oar strokes timing to their song. Whittier. [1913 Webster] 2. To pass time; to delay. [Obs.] [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Time — This article is about the measurement. For the magazine, see Time (magazine). For other uses, see Time (disambiguation). The flow of sand in an hourglass can be used to keep track of elapsed time. It also concretely represents the present as… …   Wikipedia

  • time — /tuym/, n., adj., v., timed, timing. n. 1. the system of those sequential relations that any event has to any other, as past, present, or future; indefinite and continuous duration regarded as that in which events succeed one another. 2. duration …   Universalium

  • time — See: ABOUT TIME, AGAINST TIME, AT A TIME, AT ONE TIME, AT THE SAME TIME, AT TIMES, BEHIND THE TIMES, BEHIND TIME, BIDE ONE S TIME, BIG TIME, EVERY TIME ONE TURNS AROUND, FOR THE TIME BEING, FROM TIME TO TIME, GIVE A HARD TIME, HAVE A TIME, HIGH… …   Dictionary of American idioms

  • time — See: ABOUT TIME, AGAINST TIME, AT A TIME, AT ONE TIME, AT THE SAME TIME, AT TIMES, BEHIND THE TIMES, BEHIND TIME, BIDE ONE S TIME, BIG TIME, EVERY TIME ONE TURNS AROUND, FOR THE TIME BEING, FROM TIME TO TIME, GIVE A HARD TIME, HAVE A TIME, HIGH… …   Dictionary of American idioms

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