I. noun Etymology: Middle English terme, from Anglo-French, from Latin terminus boundary marker, limit; akin to Greek termōn boundary, end, Sanskrit tarman top of a post Date: 13th century 1. a. end, termination; also a point in time assigned to something (as a payment) b. the time at which a pregnancy of normal length terminates <
had her baby at full term
2. a. a limited or definite extent of time; especially the time for which something lasts ; duration, tenure <
term of office
lost money in the short term
b. the whole period for which an estate is granted; also the estate or interest held by one for a term c. the time during which a court is in session 3. plural provisions that determine the nature and scope of an agreement ; conditions <
terms of sale
liberal credit terms
4. a. a word or expression that has a precise meaning in some uses or is peculiar to a science, art, profession, or subject <
legal terms
b. plural expression of a specified kind <
described in glowing terms
5. a. a unitary or compound expression connected with another by a plus or minus sign b. an element of a fraction or proportion or of a series or sequence 6. plural a. mutual relationship ; footing <
on good terms
b. agreement, concord <
come to terms after extensive negotiations
c. a state of acceptance or understanding <
came to terms with the failure of his marriage
7. any of the three substantive elements of a syllogism 8. a quadrangular pillar often tapering downward and adorned on the top with the figure of a head or the upper part of the body 9. division in a school year during which instruction is regularly given to students II. transitive verb Date: circa 1557 to apply a term to ; call, name

New Collegiate Dictionary. 2001.

, , , , , , / , , , , / (considered as having a definite meaning; particularly a technical word), , , / (of a syllogism, of an equation, of a fraction, of a proportion, etc.), , , , , , , , ,

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Term — Term, n. [F. terme, L. termen, inis, terminus, a boundary limit, end; akin to Gr. ?, ?. See {Thrum} a tuft, and cf. {Terminus}, {Determine}, {Exterminate}.] 1. That which limits the extent of anything; limit; extremity; bound; boundary. [1913… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • term — n often attrib 1: a specified period of time the policy term 2: the whole period for which an estate is granted; also: the estate itself 3 a: the period in which the powers of a court may be validly exercised b …   Law dictionary

  • Term — may refer to: *Term (computers) or terminal emulator, a program that emulates a video terminal *Term (language) or terminology, a word or compound word used in a specific context *Term (mathematics), a component of a mathematical expression… …   Wikipedia

  • Term — Term, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Termed}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Terming}.] [See {Term}, n., and cf. {Terminate}.] To apply a term to; to name; to call; to denominate. [1913 Webster] Men term what is beyond the limits of the universe imaginary space. Locke.… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • term — ► NOUN 1) a word or phrase used to describe a thing or to express a concept. 2) (terms) language used on a particular occasion: a protest in the strongest possible terms. 3) (terms) stipulated or agreed requirements or conditions. 4) (terms)… …   English terms dictionary

  • term — term1 [tʉrm] n. [ME terme < OFr < L terminus, a limit, boundary, end < IE * termṇ, a boundary stake < base * ter , to cross over, go beyond > TRANS , Gr terma, goal] 1. Archaic a point of time designating the beginning or end of a… …   English World dictionary

  • term — [n1] description of a concept appellation, article, caption, denomination, designation, expression, head, indication, language, locution, moniker*, name, nomenclature, phrase, style, terminology, title, vocable, word; concepts 275,683 term [n2]… …   New thesaurus

  • term — (n.) early 13c., terme limit in time, set or appointed period, from O.Fr. terme limit of time or place (11c.), from L. terminus end, boundary line, related to termen boundary, end (see TERMINUS (Cf. terminus)). Sense of period of time during… …   Etymology dictionary

  • Term — der; s, e <aus gleichbed. fr. terme, eigtl. »Grenze, Begrenzung«, dies aus (m)lat. terminus, vgl. ↑Termin>: 1. [Reihe von] Zeichen in einer formalisierten Theorie, mit der od. dem eines der in der Theorie betrachteten Objekte dargestellt… …   Das große Fremdwörterbuch

  • term — англ. [тэ/эм] terme фр. [тэрм] termine ит. [тэ/рминэ] Terminus нем. [тэрминус] термин …   Словарь иностранных музыкальных терминов

  • -term — term, terma, termalan, terman, terme, termički, termija, termijski, termika DEFINICIJA kao drugi dio riječi označava ono što se odnosi na toplinu [homeoterman; heterotermijski] ETIMOLOGIJA grč. thermós: topao; thérmē: toplina …   Hrvatski jezični portal

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