I. verb (surged; surging) Etymology: earlier, to ride (at anchor) probably in part from Middle French sourgir to cast anchor, land, from Catalan surgir to heave, cast anchor, from Latin surgere to rise, spring up; from sub- up + regere to lead straight; in part from Latin surgere — more at sub-, right Date: 1511 intransitive verb 1. to rise and fall actively ; toss <
a ship surging in heavy seas
2. to rise and move in waves or billows ; swell <
the sea was surging
3. to slip around a windlass, capstan, or bitts — used especially of a rope 4. to rise suddenly to an excessive or abnormal value <
the stock market surgeed to a record high
5. to move with a surge or in surges <
felt the blood surging into his face — Harry Hervey
she surged past the other runners
transitive verb to let go or slacken gradually (as a rope) II. noun Date: 1520 1. a swelling, rolling, or sweeping forward like that of a wave or series of waves <
a surge of interest
2. a. a large wave or billow ; swell b. (1) a series of such swells or billows (2) the resulting elevation of water level 3. a. a movement (as a slipping or slackening) of a rope or cable b. a sudden jerk or strain caused by such a movement 4. a transient sudden rise of current or voltage in an electrical circuit

New Collegiate Dictionary. 2001.


Look at other dictionaries:

  • Surge — may refer to: *Surge (soft drink), a soft drink formerly made by The Coca Cola Company. *Jerk or surge, the rate of change of acceleration in physics *Storm surge, the onshore gush of water associated with a low pressure weather system… …   Wikipedia

  • Surge — Surge, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Surged}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Surging}.] [Cf. F. surgir to cast anchor, to land. Cf. {Surge}, n.] (Naut.) To let go or slacken suddenly, as a rope; as, to surge a hawser or messenger; also, to slacken the rope about (a… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • surge — surge; surge·less; in·surge; re·surge; …   English syllables

  • surge — [sʉrj] n. [LME sourge, fountain, stream, prob. < OFr sourgeon < stem of sourdre, to rise < L surgere, to rise, spring up < * subsregere < subs , var. of sub (see SUB ) + regere, to direct (see RIGHT)] 1. a) a large mass of or as of …   English World dictionary

  • Surge — Surge, n. [L. surgere, surrectum, to raise, to rise; sub under + regere to direct: cf. OF. surgeon, sourgeon, fountain. See {Regent}, and cf. {Insurrection}, {Sortie}, {Source}.] 1. A spring; a fountain. [Obs.] Divers surges and springs of water …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Surge — Surge, v. i. 1. To swell; to rise hifg and roll. [1913 Webster] The surging waters like a mountain rise. Spenser. [1913 Webster] 2. (Naut.) To slip along a windlass. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • surge — [n] rush, usually of liquid billow, breaker, deluge, efflux, flood, flow, growth, gush, intensification, outpouring, rise, roll, surf, swell, upsurge, wave; concepts 432,467,787 surge [v] rush, usually in liquid form arise, billow, climb, deluge …   New thesaurus

  • surge — ► NOUN 1) a sudden powerful forward or upward movement. 2) a sudden large temporary increase. 3) a powerful rush of an emotion or feeling. ► VERB 1) move in a surge. 2) increase suddenly and powerfully. ORIGIN …   English terms dictionary

  • Surge — Surge, fette, ungewaschene Wolle, kommt aus der Levante u. Berberin den Handel …   Pierer's Universal-Lexikon

  • surge — index growth (increase), increase, increment, inflate, inflation (increase), inundate, issue ( …   Law dictionary

  • Surge —   [dt. Überspannung], Spannung …   Universal-Lexikon

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