subjunctive
I. adjective Etymology: Late Latin subjunctivus, from Latin subjunctus, past participle of subjungere to join beneath, subordinate Date: 1530 of, relating to, or constituting a verb form or set of verb forms that represents a denoted act or state not as fact but as contingent or possible or viewed emotionally (as with doubt or desire) <
the subjunctive mood
>
II. noun Date: 1622 1. the subjunctive mood of a language 2. a form of verb or verbal in the subjunctive mood

New Collegiate Dictionary. 2001.

Synonyms:

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  • Subjunctive — Sub*junc tive, n. (Gram.) The subjunctive mood; also, a verb in the subjunctive mood. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Subjunctive — Sub*junc tive, a. [L. subjunctivus, fr. subjungere, subjunctum, to subjoin: cf. F. subjonctif. See {Subjoin}.] Subjoined or added to something before said or written. [1913 Webster] {Subjunctive mood} (Gram.), that form of a verb which express… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • subjunctive — 1520s, mood employed to denote an action or state as conceived and not as a fact, from L.L. subjunctivus serving to join, connecting, from pp. stem of subjungere to append, add at the end, place under, from sub under (see SUB (Cf. sub )) +… …   Etymology dictionary

  • subjunctive — Grammar ► ADJECTIVE ▪ (of a form of a verb) expressing what is imagined or wished or possible. ► NOUN ▪ a verb in the subjunctive mood. ORIGIN Latin subjunctivus, from subjungere add to, join in addition …   English terms dictionary

  • subjunctive — [səb juŋk′tiv] adj. [LL subjunctivus < L subjunctus, pp. of subjungere, to SUBJOIN] Gram. designating or of the mood of a verb that is used to express supposition, desire, hypothesis, possibility, etc., rather than to state an actual fact (Ex …   English World dictionary

  • subjunctive — subjunctively, adv. /seuhb jungk tiv/, Gram. adj. 1. (in English and certain other languages) noting or pertaining to a mood or mode of the verb that may be used for subjective, doubtful, hypothetical, or grammatically subordinate statements or… …   Universalium

  • subjunctive — sub•junc•tive [[t]səbˈdʒʌŋk tɪv[/t]] adj. 1) gram. of or designating a grammatical mood typically used for subjective, doubtful, hypothetical, or grammatically subordinate statements or questions, as the mood of be in if this be treason Compare… …   From formal English to slang

  • subjunctive — /səbˈdʒʌŋktɪv / (say suhb jungktiv) Grammar –adjective 1. (in many languages) designating or relating to a verb mood having among its functions the expression of contingent or hypothetical action. For example, in the sentence Were I but king,… …   Australian English dictionary

  • subjunctive — 1. adjective inflected to indicate that an act or state of being is possible, contingent or hypothetical, and not a fact. English examples include so be it; I wouldn’t if I were you; were I a younger man, I would fight back; I asked that he leave …   Wiktionary

  • subjunctive — sub|junc|tive [səbˈdʒʌŋktıv] n [Date: 1500 1600; : Late Latin; Origin: subjunctivus, from Latin subjunctus, past participle of subjungere to join below, subordinate ] a verb form or a set of verb forms in grammar, used in some languages to… …   Dictionary of contemporary English

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