streak
I. noun Etymology: Middle English streke, from Old English strica; akin to Old High German strich line, Latin striga row — more at strike Date: before 12th century 1. a line or mark of a different color or texture from the ground ; stripe 2. a. the color of the fine powder of a mineral obtained by scratching or rubbing against a hard white surface and constituting an important distinguishing character b. inoculum implanted in a line on a solid medium c. any of numerous virus diseases of plants (as tobacco and maize) resembling mosaic but usually producing at least some linear markings 3. a. a narrow band of light b. a lightning bolt 4. a. a slight admixture ; trace <
had a mean streak in him
>
b. a brief run (as of luck) c. a consecutive series <
was on a winning streak
>
5. a narrow layer (as of fat) 6. an act or instance of streaking II. verb Date: 1576 transitive verb to make streaks on or in <
tears streaking her face
>
intransitive verb 1. to move swiftly ; rush <
a jet streaking across the sky
>
2. to have a streak (as of winning or outstanding performances) 3. to run naked through a public place • streaker noun

New Collegiate Dictionary. 2001.

Synonyms:

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Streak — or streaking may refer to:*Streaking, running naked in a public place *Streaking (microbiology), a method of purifying micro organisms *Streak (mineralogy), the color left by a mineral dragged across a rough surface *Streak camera, device to… …   Wikipedia

  • Streak — Runner ist eine Bezeichnung für Läufer, die täglich laufen. Nach den Regeln der amerikanischen Streak Running Vereinigung (USRSA, United States Running Streak Association), die weltweit anerkannt werden, gelten für einen Streak, also eine Serie… …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • streak — UK US /striːk/ noun [C, usually singular] ► a period of time during which something continues to happen, for example to go up or down in value or to succeed or fail: a streak of sth »Stocks tumbled Thursday, ending a three session streak of… …   Financial and business terms

  • streak — [strēk] n. [ME streke < OE strica: for IE base see STRIKE] 1. a line or long, thin mark; stripe or smear, generally differing in color or texture from the surrounding area 2. a ray of light or a flash, as of lightning 3. a vein or stratum of a …   English World dictionary

  • streak — ► NOUN 1) a long, thin mark of a different substance or colour from its surroundings. 2) an element of a specified kind in someone s character: a ruthless streak. 3) a spell of specified success or luck: a winning streak . ► VERB 1) mark with… …   English terms dictionary

  • Streak — Streak, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Streaked}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Streaking}.] 1. To form streaks or stripes in or on; to stripe; to variegate with lines of a different color, or of different colors. [1913 Webster] A mule . . . streaked and dappled with… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Streak — Streak, v. t. [Cf. {Stretch}, {Streek}.] To stretch; to extend; hence, to lay out, as a dead body. [Obs. or Prov. Eng. & Scot.] [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Streak — Streak, n. [OE. streke; akin to D. streek a line, stroke, G. strich, AS. strica, Sw. strek, Dan. streg, Goth. stricks, and E. strike, stroke. See {Strike}, {Stroke}, n., and cf. {Strake}.] 1. A line or long mark of a different color from the… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • streak — [n] vein, line; small part band, bar, beam, dash, element, hint, intimation, layer, ray, ridge, rule, shade, slash, smear, strain, stream, strip, stripe, stroke, suggestion, suspicion, touch, trace; concepts 436,628,657,727 streak [v] make a line …   New thesaurus

  • streak — index frame (mood) Burton s Legal Thesaurus. William C. Burton. 2006 …   Law dictionary

  • streak — n strain, vein, *touch, suggestion, suspicion, soupçon, tincture, tinge, shade, smack, spice, dash …   New Dictionary of Synonyms

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